The best 2020 nutrient management plan is one that is planned now

By: Ron Geis, Market Development Specialist, Iowa, Corteva Agriscience       

Nitrogen is one of the single biggest expenses for farmers, and a lot of times, we hope that mother nature helps in keeping it where it should be. Relying on nature to take good care of your nitrogen is risky, but the good news is a smart nutrient management plan can help mitigate some of that risk.

Nutrient management, and nutrient success, requires preplanning and a good understanding of how corn takes up nitrogen, what the soil in your area requires and what’s needed to increase yield. Taking the time to help your customers preplan their nutrient management now can really make a difference in how their fields and yield looks by this time next year.

How to plan for 2020 nutrient needs
When building your 2020 nutrient management plan, it’s important to first consider the entire system and look at factors like soil type, weather patterns, past yield history and previous application rates and combinations. This will help identify how much nitrogen will be needed to raise a bushel of corn in the coming season and what actions need to occur throughout the year to achieve this.

Beyond a depth of knowledge of the operation location and conditions, there are other tools to help uncover nutrient needs so a solid nutrient management plan can be built accordingly.

  • Digital tools
    Drone and imagery scouting has grown in popularity and has proven to be a helpful tool in providing a complete look at your customers’ fields. These tools help map problem areas that need some nutrient TLC and can help around harvest as we begin planning nutrient needs for next year. Drones and imagery can also be used next spring and summer to help calculate where nutrient corrections need to happen in-season.
  • Variable applications
    Beside the great digital tools that allow us to see deficiencies early enough to take action, nutrient management plans should include the practice of variable applications of nutrients and occasionally crop protection products. This helps maximize the efficiency of your applied nutrients by going to the soil when crops need it most and protects against overapplying nutrition.
  • Nitrogen stabilizers
    Nitrogen stabilizers, such as N-Serve® and Instinct®, are an important component to a nutrient management plan because they help provide a sense of insurance to applied nitrogen. They extend the availability of nitrogen in the soil so it’s there during critical growth phases. Additionally, nitrogen stabilizers protect nitrogen from leaching and denitrification, so your nitrogen will be less vulnerable to loss in variable weather conditions.

Where to start? What can be done now?
From now through harvest, retailers should focus on fall nitrogen applications and get a head start mapping out nutrient needs and methods of protecting nitrogen with their customers. Retailers should talk with hog producers and manure applicators about applying Instinct directly to their pits. They should also talk to fall anhydrous ammonia users about stabilizing with N-Serve.

When it comes to fall nitrogen application, it’s best to wait for cooler temperatures and refrain from applying too early so you don’t lose valuable nitrogen. The ideal application range is at 50 F and falling. Nitrate conversion stops around 40 F, which typically in the Midwest is around late November. By using a nitrogen stabilizer with fall applications, you will have that nitrogen protected through the heavy rain periods in April and May. And, really, this is the best way to begin your 2020 nutrient management plan.

In summary, good nutrient management not only helps with yield and can be a differentiating margin opportunity for you but also is helpful to your customers’ investments, bottom line and the environment.

About the author: Ron Geis is a market development specialist at Corteva Agriscience. He started his career in 1984 with DuPont Crop Protection, working the first 15 years in southern Nebraska and the past 20 years in northern Iowa. He has been Certified Crop Adviser since the program’s inception.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Consider fall burndown for fields prevent planted or left fallow

With so many acres prevent planted or left fallow this season, it’s critical for impacted farmers to manage that potential seedbank now, or risk having to invest significant weed control resources in the future.

“This year was very unusual because of the scale of the areas affected by prevent plant,” says Mike Koenigs, market development specialist with Corteva Agriscience. “It’s common to have small pockets of prevent plant in areas, but it’s uncommon that so many key states are impacted like they were in 2019.”

Koenigs says fall weed management is essential on fallow fields. That’s because if prolific seed-producing winter annuals like marestail are left to go to seed and overwinter, their seedbanks will likely grow exponentially, doing damage for years to come.

“One year of no weed management can have a longer-term impact on a farm,” Koenigs says. “Let it go for one year, and it’s likely that you’ll be fighting this problem the next seven years.”

An innovative solution for farmers in this situation is a fall burndown application with Elevore® herbicide. Elevore employs a systemic approach that kills weeds from the inside out, delivering more thorough control — even of marestail up to 8 inches tall. Elevore is labeled for use in soybeans, corn and cotton and is tank-mix-compatible with commonly used burndown and residual herbicide partners, including glyphosate and 2,4-D.

Key benefits of fall burndown with Elevore® herbicide

  • Controls actively growing winter annuals like marestail and glyphosate-resistant weeds, such as henbit, lambsquarters and cutleaf evening primrose
  • Low use rate of 1 ounce per acre makes it an excellent fit for fall burndown with customers using reduced- or no-till production systems
  • Fights weed resistance with a new active ingredient, Arylex® active
  • Prevents regrowth of emerged broadleaf weeds for complete control
  • Easily tank-mixes with commonly used burndown and residual tank-mix partners, including glyphosate and 2, 4-D

“An effective fall burndown program is the best recommendation for prevent plant acres,” Koenig says. “It gets you ahead of the winter annuals to help prevent an explosion of the weed seedbank and really gets you a head start on the 2020 crop.”

Every state has been affected differently. Visit preventplant.corteva.us to read more timely, expert advice for weed control in fallow and prevent planted fields this fall.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Elevore is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Arylex is a registered active ingredient. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Farmer Demand for Enlist E3™ Soybeans Will Generate Strong Sales of Enlist™ Herbicides

The initial reaction from soybean farmers who are growing Enlist E3 soybean varieties this summer has been extremely positive. Many say they expect to plant 100% Enlist E3 soybeans in 2020. That means retailers have the opportunity to sell a lot of Enlist herbicides next spring and summer.

Corteva Agriscience projects Enlist E3 soybeans will make up at least 10% of the U.S. soybean market share in 2020, and some geographies will have significantly higher adoption than the national average. Enlist E3 soybeans will be available from all Corteva Agriscience brands: Pioneer, Mycogen, AgVenture, Dairyland Seed, Hoegemeyer, NuTech, Seed Consultants and Terral.

In addition, Corteva Agriscience is working with more than 100 independent seed organizations to license the Enlist E3 soybean trait. This will give significantly more farmers access to Enlist E3 soybeans for 2020 and beyond. See Enlist.com for a list of seed companies who are licensing the Enlist E3 trait.

Seed dealers are gearing up for heavy sales. Reuben Koehler is an Illinois seed dealer who sees big things for Enlist E3 soybeans in his area.

“I think Enlist will be a huge player for us,” he says. “I hope to get near 40% market share from customers next year. Guys are in the right frame of mind to try it. A lot of them are on board already.”

Ben Hortenstine, an Illinois farmer who has used the Enlist weed control system for three years now, says he plans to be 100% Enlist E3 soybeans in 2020. “One of my neighbors also says he intends to go heavy on Enlist E3 soybeans, maybe even 100%, next year,” Hortenstine adds.

“If the yield is good, we’ll go all Enlist E3 soybeans next year,” says Lynnet Talcott, who farms with her husband, her son and her daughter-in-law in Nebraska. “As far as weed control, it’s a 10. The field is clean as it can be. It’s what we were looking for.”

All this means retailers should consider keeping plenty of Enlist One® and Enlist Duo® herbicides on hand, along with qualified glyphosate and glufosinate tank-mix partners, which farmers also can use on Enlist E3 soybeans. Consider Durango® DMA® herbicide, a glyphosate product, from Corteva Agriscience for tank-mixing needs with Enlist One herbicide.

“Retailers may want to invest in bulk storage for Enlist herbicides,” suggests Shawna Hubbard, Product Manager for Corteva Agriscience. “We’ll have ample supply of both Enlist One and Enlist Duo for 2020 to cover Enlist E3 soybean, Enlist cotton and Enlist corn acres. We expect high demand from farmers who will be applying during the 2020 season and continued growth in future years.”

Learn more about Enlist E3 soybeans as well as Enlist One and Enlist Duo® herbicides by talking to a Corteva Agriscience territory manager, by going to Enlist.com or by using Enlist Ahead resources. Also check out the YouTube channel or our Twitter page @EnlistOnline.

Demand for Enlist™ herbicides is likely to increase substantially as farmers quickly adopt Enlist E3™ soybeans. Retailers can book deliveries now to meet customer needs.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist E3™ soybean technology is jointly developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC and MS Technologies LLC. Durango DMA, Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Another great year at Farm Progress Show

One sure sign summer is coming to a close is the annual Farm Progress Show. It’s an event employees at Corteva Agriscience look forward to every year, because it gives those who attend the chance to meet farmers and retailers from all over the country, and even the globe.

This year, Corteva sent teams from multiple crop protection businesses, as well as from Pioneer Seeds. Those teams were among the thousands of people who descended upon Decatur, Illinois for the three-day show in late August.

Those who visited the Corteva tent got to enjoy the beautiful backyard patio where they could relax and converse, fill up on free water and play games like Jenga and corn hole. After the long days, Corteva welcomed more than a few weary travelers looking to take a load off.

Inside the Corteva tent, many attendees enjoyed the interactive cash grab experience on behalf of TruChoice, where participants won a variety of prizes. In addition, a magician was on hand, as well as a balloon animal artist, which were big hits for all the tent’s visitors.

Just a few doors down, visitors could drop in on the Pioneer booth where they learned more about the very latest in seed, planting and scouting technology.

Both booths had stages featuring talks and presentations throughout the three days of the show. One particularly popular presentation was a panel of Enlist weed control system growers at the crop protection booth. The three farmers spoke and answered questions about their experiences growing Enlist E3 Soybeans. Enlist Field Specialist Dan Puck led the conversation.

Overall, the Corteva crop protection and Pioneer seed experts met with hundreds of growers during the three-day show. The experts talked with those growers about the challenges they faced in 2019 and gave them advice for harvest and 2020 planning.

It was a great event and we’re already looking forward to next year in Boone, Iowa.

The front and back yards of the Corteva Agriscience booth at Farm Progress Show.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2019 Corteva.

A clean start leads to a strong harvest

As summer winds down and harvest approaches, there’s almost no better sight than a clean field. Smithboro, Illinois, farmer Allen Tompkins has been enjoying that sight all season, thanks to his weed control program for corn.

Tompkins uses 1 pint of SureStart® II herbicide and 1½ quarts of Resicore® herbicide as the main ingredients to keep his corn fields weed-free. It’s a tailored program Tompkins has used for the last five years on the advice of his retailer Jeremy Leininger of Woolsey Brothers Farm Supply in Vandalia, Illinois.

“We did the Resicore and SureStart program about five or six days after planting, and I can’t tell you if I’ve seen a weed out there,” Tompkins explains.

He says the strength and flexibility of this herbicide program kept weeds under control, even as the weather was out of control.

Tompkins says there was enough constant rain to keep him out of fields from the end of October 2018 until May 2019. Excessive moisture early in the season can make weed control more difficult. Despite planting late, Tompkins noticed clean fields throughout the season because of his powerful weed control program. From his experience, the cleaner the field, the easier the harvest.

“If you get a super weedy field, there are always weeds that are getting wrapped up in your machinery,” he says. “You have to get out, dig everything out, and it’s just a really big pain to harvest. Clean fields just make everything go smoother. Not only are they aesthetically pleasing, but they’re a lot more pleasing when you’re in the seat of the combine.”

To learn how SureStart II can help keep your customers’ fields clean for an easier harvest, visit SureStartII.com.

Illinois farmer Allen Tompkins uses SureStart® II herbicide and Resicore® herbicide to keep his corn fields clean. This photo was taken in July 2019.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

During a rushed harvest, don’t skip these nitrogen steps

Harvest will likely be rushed this year as a result of the planting delays this spring. This means a shorter window in which to gather crops and prepare fields for next year. With this time crunch, your customers may overlook or forget some basic best practices for fall operations. In the case of nitrogen application, these best practices can make the difference between a boosted 2020 yield and loss of this valuable input.

With that in mind, if soil conditions and weather allow for fall applications on your customers’ fields, now is a good time to review best practices to maximize nitrogen-related success.

Fall application best practices

When it comes to fall application, there are several do’s and don’ts to consider.

  • Do’s
    • Apply only anhydrous ammonia or manure fertilizer in fall.
    • Apply after Oct. 1, but only if temperatures are cool enough.
    • Apply to soil that is 50 F 4 inches below the surface. You want soil that is 50 F, or lower, but not freezing.
    • For clay soils, apply half the nitrogen in fall and half in spring.
  • Don’ts
    • Don’t apply if it’s raining.
    • Don’t apply to sandy soils or in fields prone to spring flooding.
    • Don’t apply if the ground is frozen; the nutrients won’t absorb.

Most of all, be sure to apply a nitrogen stabilizer
Nitrogen has a long time to wait between fall application and spring crop uptake, so you’ll want to protect it with a nitrogen stabilizer to ensure it’s still in the soil come spring. A nitrogen stabilizer, such as N-Serve® for anhydrous ammonia and Instinct® for liquid manure, protects fall-applied nitrogen from leaching and denitrification in warming spring soils. This is important because it keeps nitrogen in the root zone during critical crop growth periods and doesn’t leave your farmers’ costly investment vulnerable to loss.

In all, adhering to these best practices can help postharvest nitrogen application be a success and can help maximize 2020 yield goals.

Visit NitrogenMaximizers.com to learn more about protecting farmers’ nutrient investments this fall. While there, you can also use the Profit Calculator to see how N-Serve and Instinct can impact your bottom line come harvest.

If the weather and soil are right for it, a fall nitrogen application is a good idea.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Weed of the Month: Purple Deadnettle

You may spy the color purple in the field and wonder what weed it is. While purple deadnettle looks similar to its relative henbit, they have various distinctive characteristics. Read below to learn how to identify and control purple deadnettle.

  • Common name: Purple deadnettle
  • Scientific name: Lamium purpureum1
  • Annual or perennial: winter annual2
  • Leaf arrangement: opposite2
  • Leaf venation: palmate2
  • Leaf width: ½ to 1 inch2
  • Leaf shape: triangular to heart-shaped3
  • Root type: fibrous2

Fast facts

  • Life cycle: Since purple deadnettle is a winter annual, it will grow best in the spring. It dies during the warmer summer months and will germinate again the fall. The weed remains dormant through the winter and grows well if warm weather is present.2
  • Reproduction: Purple deadnettle produces flowers in the spring that are blue and/or purple in color.2
  • Seeds: Approximately 27,000 seeds are produced per plant in areas without competition. The seeds then germinate in the early fall.1
  • Soil types: Purple deadnettle thrives in nutrient-rich soils. For example, you could find it in humic, loamy or sandy-loamy soils.1

Spot the differences between purple deadnettle and henbit

  • Purple deadnettle can reach heights of 16 to 18 inches tall; henbit can grow up to 15 inches tall.3
  • Both species have oval-shaped cotyledons; however, in henbit, the hypocotyl is green and turns purple as it grows.3
  • Henbit has hairs on the top of leaves, while purple deadnettle does not.3
  • The upper leaves of purple deadnettle are purple/red in color, while the lower leaves are a deep green. All leaves on henbit are green.3
  • Henbit has a square-shaped stem, while purple deadnettle does not.3

Control tips

  • Control is most effective in the fall, when the plants are germinating and young.1
  • Tillage is an easy way to control deadnettle when done in the spring.1
  • Many herbicides are effective when applied in the fall or early spring.1
  • If you are planting small grains, alfalfa or crops in a no-tillage system, deadnettle may compete for resources. Plant these crops at high rates to suppress its growth.1

Corteva Agriscience offers the following weed control solutions:

Corn Herbicides

DuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
FulTime® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
DuPont Realm® Q herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
SureStart® II herbicide

Soybean Herbicides
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
DuPont EverpreX® herbicide
FirstRate® herbicide
Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
DuPont Trivence® herbicide
DuPontEnlite® herbicide
DuPontAfforia® herbicide
DuPont™ FeXapan™ herbicide Plus VaporGrip® Technology


Sources:

1Michigan State University, Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences. Purple deadnettle. https://www.canr.msu.edu/weeds/extension/purple-dead­nettle
2Peacock, C. Purple Deadnettle. https://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/weeds-in-turf/purple-deadnettle/
3Steckel, L. Purple Deadnettle and Henbit. https://extension.tennessee.edu/publications/Documents/W165.pdf

Additional Resource:

University of Missouri, Division of Plant Sciences. 2018. Purple Deadnettle. https://weedid.missouri.edu/weedinfo.cfm?weed_id=153

Afforia, Cinch, DMA, DuPont, Durango, Elevore, Enlist, Enlist Duo, Enlist One, Enlite, EverpreX, FeXapan, FirstRate, FulTime, Keystone, Realm, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart, Surveil and Trivence are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. VaporGrip® is a registered trademark of the Bayer Group. Cinch ATZ, FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are Restricted Use Pesticides. Cinch ATZ, Durango DMA, Elevore, FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Realm Q, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. EverpreX is not registered in all states. See your Corteva Agriscience retailer or representative for availability in your state. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

FeXapan® herbicide Plus VaporGrip® Technology is a Restricted Use Pesticide. For retail sale to and use only by Certified Applicators and only for those uses covered by the Certified Applicator’s certification. FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. VaporGrip Technology is a registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license.