Resicore® herbicide impresses corn growers in the first season

Lyndsie Kaehler
Product Manager, Corn Herbicides
Dow AgroSciences

Keeping cornfields clean until the crop reaches canopy closure is an important step for maximum yield potential at harvest. In the first season, Resicore® corn herbicide is helping growers across the Midwest achieve this vital goal with impressive power over weeds.

Though Resicore is in its infancy, growers and ag retailers across the Midwest, including Nebraska, Illinois and Missouri, are seeing long-awaited results in weed control. Because of the extended residual control and multiple modes of action, growers and retailers are reporting contained weed pressure several weeks after application.

Corn and soybean grower Steve Plambeck from Kenesaw, Nebraska, custom-applied Resicore at the end of April. With resistance issues and tough weeds like waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, Plambeck said he was in need of a product with multiple modes of action that is effective on these broadleaf species. Resicore not only worked, but it also kept his fields clean until the corn reached canopy.

“I kept watching the fields, and you always expect a few escapes, and this was really staying clean,” Plambeck says. “It’s really impressive, and it’s great to not have to go back and rescue anything.”

In the first season, Resicore has exceeded expectations by providing power over troublesome weed species. Dow AgroSciences field trials have shown 97 percent control of Palmer amaranth, waterhemp and giant ragweed, which are significant results for growers consistently plagued by heavy weed pressure.*

Resicore® herbicide is a novel formulation of three active ingredients with three nonglyphosate and nonatrazine modes of action to control more than 70 broadleaf weeds and grasses. With the combination of acetochlor, mesotrione and clopyralid, Resicore gives growers the power over weeds they need for resounding yield potential at harvest.

See the power of Resicore in more clean cornfields across the Midwest at PowerOverWeeds.com/From-the-Field.

*2014-15 Dow AgroSciences field trials, average weed control eight weeks after application of Resicore herbicide at 1x label rate for soil type.

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This northern Illinois field tends to face infestations of herbicide-resistant waterhemp. After an application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide and 1 pt./A atrazine, the field stayed clean through canopy closure.

Nebraska field seven weeks after an application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide herbicide with 1 qt. atrazine.

Nebraska field seven weeks after an application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide herbicide with 1 qt. atrazine.

Missouri field four weeks after an application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide.

Missouri field four weeks after an application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Resicore is not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Growers finding solid value in Enlist™ weed control system

Corn, soybean and cotton growers have planted Enlist crops this summer and are seeing the benefits of the Enlist weed control system. The consensus? The Enlist technology performs as described. It’s helping them control their toughest weeds.

Enlist corn and soybean growers are using Enlist Duo® herbicide to control a host of difficult weeds, including species that have developed resistance to some herbicides. Just as important, Enlist Duo features Colex-D® technology, so applications stay on target.

Here’s what these growers are reporting:

“Application of Enlist Duo went great,” says Ben Hortenstine, an Illinois grower who planted Enlist soybeans this year. “I’d heard plenty about Enlist Duo, but seeing it in the field confirmed what I’d heard. If growers are familiar with traditional 2,4-D, Enlist Duo is not even comparable. There were essentially no driftable fines; it just went straight down from the boom. The weeds started wilting before I even got out of the field with the sprayer. I was really impressed.”

A Missouri grower also saw no off-target movement and great crop tolerance with Enlist Duo® herbicide.

“After the application of Enlist Duo herbicide, I could see no evidence at all on the beans. There was no burn or wrinkling of leaves at all,” says Josh Turner of Missouri. “The tolerance to the chemical is a big value. Enlist Duo did what we expected. We got good weed control.”

Iowa grower Steve Bireline was impressed by the weed control Enlist Duo provided in his Enlist cornfield. “Enlist Duo took all the competition away from the corn plant,” Bireline says. “The end result to me is going to be that plant is able to concentrate on its kernels, its ear size. I think that plant will produce a maximum yield with the fertilization we’ve got out there, and it should make a big difference in the bottom line.”

“I’m really pleased with the weed control,” adds Steve Kliewer of Kansas. Kliewer is growing Enlist corn in an irrigated field this summer. “There are no signs of drift or off-target movement. I’m just real pleased with the way the field looks.”

Cotton growers this year are experiencing the advantages of PhytoGen® brand PHY 490 W3FE, which contains the Enlist trait. Although the use of Enlist Duo® herbicide is not yet registered for Enlist cotton, growers are able to apply glufosinate postemergence, another important mode of action against tough and resistant weeds.

“We have a glufosinate tolerance now that we can actually apply when we need to and not worry about hurting yield,” says Bradley Moore, a Tennessee cotton grower.

These growers are seeing firsthand the benefits for the Enlist weed control system. It’s meeting or exceeding expectations. You can visit Experiencing Enlist to learn more about the growers experiences with the Enlist technology, including Enlist traits and Enlist Duo herbicide with Colex-D technology. To learn more about the Enlist weed control system, visit our YouTube channel, follow us on Twitter at @EnlistOnline or visit Enlist.com.

A Missouri grower also saw no off-target movement and great crop tolerance with Enlist Duo.

A Missouri grower also saw no off-target movement and great crop tolerance with Enlist Duo.

®™DOW Diamond, Colex-D, Enlist, Enlist Duo and the Enlist Logo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. ®PhytoGen is a trademark of PhytoGen Seed Company, LLC. PhytoGen Seed Company is a joint venture between Mycogen Corporation, an affiliate of Dow AgroSciences LLC, and the J.G. Boswell Company. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. Enlist Duo herbicide is not yet registered for use on Enlist cotton. Enlist Duo is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Retailer reports long residual control from Resicore® herbicide

For the past couple of years, northern Illinois ag retailer Randy Pauli saw increased pressure from herbicide-resistant waterhemp and knew growers needed a new product, without glyphosate, to control it early. Pauli recommended Resicore® herbicide this spring, and the results, he says, were impressive, chiefly on waterhemp.

In Pauli’s region, waterhemp has a history of breaking through herbicide applications early in the season. Resicore prevented waterhemp from creeping back into the fields, with residual control lasting for six weeks.

“I wanted a product that would be very strong to keep our populations low, knowing that we have heavy weed infestations on these farms,” Pauli says.“[Resicore] is a state-of-the-art chemistry that actually gives us the longest residual against waterhemp, and that’s a prime example in this field.”

Field is shown at six weeks after application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide and 1 pt./A atrazine.

Field is shown at six weeks after application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide and 1 pt./A atrazine.

Pauli tank-mixed Resicore with atrazine to boost the herbicide treatment to four modes of action, which controlled waterhemp, as well as species such as giant ragweed and marestail.

“The products that we have mainly been using the last couple of years were not doing a good job of holding down waterhemp,” Pauli says. “Waterhemp is resistant to so many chemistry modes that we need a new product like Resicore that will work on waterhemp preemergence before the weeds ever get started.”

With a novel formulation of three leading active ingredients with three nonglyphosate and nonatrazine modes of action, Resicore® herbicide controls more than 70 broadleaf weeds and grasses, including waterhemp, giant ragweed, Palmer amaranth and lambsquarters.

For more photos showing the performance of Resicore, visit PowerOverWeeds.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Resicore is not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions.

Evaluate nitrogen levels at harvest

industry-corncobSpring is not the only time growers should assess nitrogen availability. Recent studies have shown that nitrogen levels can be determined by measuring nitrate concentrations in the lower portion of cornstalks at the end of the growing season, according to an article from Iowa State University.

Corn plants with deficient levels of nitrogen remove nitrogen from the lower cornstalks and leaves in the grain-filling stage of growth.1

Therefore, testing nitrogen levels in the lower part of the plant at harvest will provide a good indication of the overall plant health, says Eric Scherder, Ph.D., field scientist, Dow AgroSciences.

A number of factors can cause nitrogen deficiency throughout the growing season, which can significantly reduce yield at harvest, according to Scherder. Leaching and denitrification are the most common ways nitrogen is lost.

“Assessing nitrogen availability at harvest can help growers plan for the following season so they can adjust their fertilizer practices in fall and spring to ensure nitrogen is available for crops to use,” Scherder says.

Nitrogen deficiency can cause growth issues in corn, which can lead to significant yield loss. Should your customers’ crops show signs of nitrogen deficiency at harvest, there are steps they can take to reduce nitrogen loss next season. Nitrogen stabilizers are one of the most effective ways growers can protect nitrogen.

When applied with anhydrous ammonia, N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizer works below ground to prevent leaching and denitrification. Instinct® II nitrogen stabilizer protects nitrogen when applied with urea, UAN and liquid manure. Instinct II and N-Serve slow the nitrification process, which keeps more nitrogen available to crops for optimum nutrient uptake and maximized yield potential.

For more information on testing nitrogen levels at harvest, read Cornstalk testing to evaluate nitrogen management from Iowa State University. To learn how to prevent nitrogen loss, visit NitrogenStabilizers.com.

1Blackmer, A.M., A.P. Mallarino. Cornstalk testing to evaluate nitrogen management.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct II is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions.

Stability helps Enlist Duo® herbicide stay on target

It’s important to note that not all herbicides have the same tendency to drift. Different herbicide formulations possess properties that impact both physical drift and volatility. Dow AgroSciences uses advanced laboratory testing methods to evaluate the propensity of various herbicides for vapor drift (volatility).

Enlist Duo® herbicide with Colex-D® technology delivers a 90 percent reduction in drift potential when applied with low-drift nozzles.

In repeated trials, Enlist Duo® herbicide featuring Colex-D® technology shows less movement than either dicamba or traditional 2,4-D formulations. This technology results in a formulation that is much more stable, which helps prevent volatility.

“The choline counterion binds more securely with the 2,4-D in Enlist Duo herbicide,” says Brandon Downer, formulation application specialist, Dow AgroSciences. “This technology gives growers confidence that Enlist Duo will stay where it’s applied and not move off-target.”

Enlist Duo® herbicide remains stable even when combined with the qualified tank mixes listed on Enlisttankmix.com. When dicamba is combined with some common tank-mix additives, such as AMS, it can be more prone to unfavorable ion competition, creating a greater risk of volatility.

Enlist Duo is 99 percent less volatile than a tank mix of dicamba diglycolamine (DGA) and glyphosate and is up to 96 percent less volatile than 2,4-D ester. When applied with low-drift nozzles, Enlist Duo® herbicide delivers a 90 percent reduction in drift potential.

The formulation provides growers scientifically sound, field-proven mitigation of physical drift and near-zero volatility. This helps ensure on-target application.

You can visit Enlist.com to learn more about Enlist technology, including Enlist traits and Enlist Duo herbicide with Colex-D technology. To learn more about the Enlist weed control system, visit our YouTube channel, follow us on Twitter at @EnlistOnline or visit Enlist.com.

®DOW Diamond, Colex-D, Enlist, Enlist Duo and the Enlist Logo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo® herbicide is not yet registered for use on Enlist cotton. Enlist Duo is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions.

Collaboration, transparency key to building consumer trust

Agricultural/food companies and growers must work together to build consumer trust through greater transparency. That was a key takeaway from a diverse panel of experts who spoke at a Dow AgroSciences event in Indianapolis recently.

Joe Kelsay, government affairs manager for Dow AgroSciences and sixth-generation farmer, moderated the discussion.

Panelists included:

  • Kelly Johnston, Campbell Soup Company vice president of government affairs
  • Pat Duncanson, Minnesota grower
  • Tim Richter, Iowa grower
  • Matt Rekeweg, industry relations and food chain leader, Dow AgroSciences
Agricultural and food industry leaders discuss consumers’ concerns about food safety at a Dow AgroSciences media event held June 30 in Indianapolis.

Agricultural and food industry leaders discuss consumers’ concerns about food safety at a Dow AgroSciences media event held June 30 in Indianapolis.

The experts brought different perspectives, but found common ground in three key areas:

1, Sustainability must evolve at every level of food production.

“Agriculture is front and center for solutions to feed the world, and sustainability is not new for any of us,” Kelsay says. “Sustainability is the story of agriculture, year after year, generation after generation. It is the way of life we know.”

However, perspectives of sustainability differ, Kelly Johnston of Campbell’s pointed out. “It’s not just about what we think or how we define sustainability, but how our customers define it,” he says.

“Whatever business you are in, you have to remain on the cutting edge,” Rekeweg says. “The minute you say you’ve got it done and right, someone will prove you wrong. Our customers will always want to know what you’ve done to be better recently.”

Iowa grower Tim Richter agreed. “We see sustainability as a journey,” he says. “We are always evaluating our goals. The science changes, and you discover the things you thought were settled aren’t. For example, the yields we see today were unfathomable 10 years ago.”

2. The ag community should work to build bridges from farm to consumer.

“While enhanced sustainability may begin at the farm level, the voice of the grower is often absent from food industry conversations,” Kelsay says. “We need to build bridges between the different sectors of our industry.”

Rekeweg agreed. “We have to recognize that most consumers are far away from the farm, physically and in life experiences,” Rekeweg says. “We need to bridge between consumers and our grower customers.”

Johnston took that one step further, saying, “We need to explain our position. For the first time in Campbell’s years, a dialogue is happening with grower groups. We need to get out of our silos and cross-engage. I want to connect the growing community with our consumers.”

“Once person-to-person contact is made, consumers often will understand the grower’s point of view,” Richter says. “We need to be proud of how we farm and the improvements we’ve made as commodity producers.”

3. Transparency is key to achieving trust in technology.

The panelists said embracing transparency is critical to creating greater consumer trust and confidence in the products grown by farmers.

“We need to explain why new technologies are coming on board,” Rekeweg says. “There are reasons why technologies are being used, and it is our responsibility to explain why the technology is important and how it helps. We want to build trust in that process.”

Trust and communications tools are necessary for the agricultural and food industries, the panelists said.

“Even in our sector there is confusion, and we need more transparency,” Duncanson says. “As an industry, we need to make an investment in communication.”

“Consumers are interested in learning about farms and food ingredients,” Johnston says. “Ultimately, consumers still care about price and convenience, but transparency gets to the core of what consumers want from food producers.”

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow

Weed of the Month: Velvetleaf

  • velvetleafCommon name: velvetleaf
  • Scientific name: abutilon theophrasti1
  • Grass or broadleaf: large-seeded broadleaf
  • Found in 48 U.S. states (not found in Alaska or Hawaii)1
  • Germination timing: summer annual
  • Competitiveness: Velvetleaf can be competitive in corn and soybeans due to the rapid and robust growth pattern of the plant. An individual mature plant can shade out 1 to 2 square feet of soil, closing the canopy and blocking sunlight crops need. If sunlight is restricted, corn and soybean yield can greatly diminish, according to Eric Scherder, Ph.D., field scientist, Dow AgroSciences.
  • Studies have shown that when velvetleaf emerges at the same time as soybeans at a density of one plant per foot of soybean row, a 14 to 27 percent yield reduction can occur.2

Fast facts from Dave Hilger, Enlist field specialist, Ph.D., Dow AgroSciences: 

  • Velvetleaf has numerous seed reserves that can remain dormant for years. As a result, velvetleaf can germinate throughout the season and is known to make a late-summer appearance in row crop systems.
  • Left uncontrolled, velvetleaf can grow up to 10 feet tall.
  • There are cases of atrazine-resistant velvetleaf in the Midwest, which can make it difficult to control in cornfields.
  • Velvetleaf is easy to identify with heart-shaped cotyledons and leaf patterns. The plants also have a high number of fine hairs that feel velvety to the touch.
  • Velvetleaf is often referred to as “buttonweed” because the seed head looks similar to a button.

Resistance statistics:*

According to WeedScience.org, the following states have reported herbicide-resistant velvetleaf in cropland, corn and soybean fields:

*Resistance confirmation does not necessarily include all weeds and may vary among different areas of each state.

Weed management tips:

Scherder says:

  • Velvetleaf has a high level of calcium relative to other weed species, which can make it difficult to control if herbicides are used at less than optimum rates. The presence of calcium in or on the leaf surface can result in inactive herbicide applications.
  • Follow label directions and rates to not only understand what effective rate is needed to control velvetleaf, but also to determine potential adjuvants or tank-mix partners that may be needed to improve efficacy and herbicide performance.
  • If planting Enlist crops, use a program approach with a preemergence herbicide such as Sonic® soybean herbicide or Resicore® corn herbicide followed by a postemergence application of Enlist Duo® herbicide to effectively control velvetleaf for the duration of the season.

Dow AgroSciences weed control solutions:

Corn

SureStart® II herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide

FulTime® NXT herbicide
Surpass® NXT herbicide 
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system

Soybean

Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system

Additional information:

More information can be found through these weed science resources:

1U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources and Conservation Service. 2016. Plant Profile: Velvetleaf. http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=ABTH
2University of Missouri. A highly competitive weed with a soft touch. 2015. http://ipm.missouri.edu/IPCM/2015/5/Weed-of-the-Month-Velvetleaf/

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are federally Restricted Use Pesticides. Enlist Duo herbicide is not yet registered for use on Enlist cotton. Duramax, Durango DMA, Enlist Duo, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II, Surpass NXT and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore, SureStart II and Surpass NXT are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions.