Stacked herbicide resistance progresses across Midwest

Dave Ruen
Field Scientist
Dow AgroSciences

For nearly two decades, herbicide-resistant weeds have swept across the Midwest. Today, more fields than ever are facing weeds with resistance to multiple modes of action. With new postemergence technologies entering the market, farmers need to remain vigilant and avoid repetitive use of one active ingredient by using residual herbicides in a program approach to control their tough weeds multiple ways.

We’re trying to manage the expansion of glyphosate-resistant weeds — marestail, waterhemp and giant ragweed, for example. There’s no question in my mind that we’ve slowed the advance of glyphosate resistance due to the resurgent use of soil-applied herbicides, such as Sonic® herbicide in soybeans.

Some weeds, such as tall waterhemp, are developing resistance to multiple modes of action, an issue farmers must keep their eyes on.

In Kansas, some tall waterhemp plants are now resistant to HPPD inhibitors, ALS inhibitors and atrazine. Meanwhile in Illinois, tall waterhemp is documented with multiple resistance to PPO inhibitors, ALS inhibitors and atrazine.

In the last few years, we’ve seen a slow expansion of herbicide-resistant weeds, particularly in the upper Midwest. It’s important that we continue to increase the use of residual herbicides and not skimp on rates.

To stop weeds from robbing yield, carefully scout soybean fields and use a targeted program approach this season. Start with a clean field by applying a broad-spectrum, preemergence herbicide that has powerful activity on the Amaranthus species, including pigweeds, waterhemps, and Palmer and Powell amaranth. With two nonglyphosate modes of action, Sonic herbicide is proven to provide 94 percent control of waterhemp and 93 percent control of Palmer amaranth.

For more information about how your customers can take control of herbicide-resistant weeds in their soybean fields, visit OperationCleanFields.com.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Help three farmers win $10,000 for nonprofits in their communities — vote now!

Ten farmers are in the running to win a trip to their dream sports field and $10,000 for their community from the Power to Do More contest, sponsored by Resicore® corn herbicide. More than 130 farmers entered the contest by uploading a photo that represents the power of their farm, and Dow AgroSciences is excited to introduce the top 10 finalists. The three finalists with the most votes on PowerToDoMore.com by May 21 will win.

The 10 finalists represent a range of farming operations across seven states: Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio and Wisconsin. From growing corn and soybeans to raising cattle and pigs, each finalist has a shared passion for farming and giving back to his or her community.

Watch the video below to see the 10 finalists’ photos before you cast your vote.

Resicore is designed to help farmers protect their crops from more than 70 tough weeds that rob corn yield, profit and time. With versatility to be applied pre-, post- or split, Resicore is powerful enough to be applied alone. It also gives farmers the ability to add their desired rate of atrazine, glyphosate and other corn herbicide to fit the acre.

For more information about Resicore, visit PowerOverWeeds.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

To support your favorite finalist in the Power to Do More contest, visit PowerToDoMore.com to vote daily and share the link to the website with your customers, friends and co-workers until May 21.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Resicore is not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Giving farmers and their neighbors peace of mind

Excellent weed control is not enough. Farmers need a herbicide solution that stays on target and limits the risk of damaging neighboring plants and crops. Research shows Enlist Duo® herbicide is superior to other technologies because it delivers less drift and near-zero volatility.

Farmers with fields near susceptible crops and plants can use Enlist Duo on Enlist crops with confidence. By applying Enlist Duo according to label directions, they can limit the danger of harmful off-target movement.

Enlist Duo herbicide, a combination of glyphosate and new 2,4-D choline, features Colex-D® technology. This formulation helps Enlist Duo stay on target. In real-world applications across the Corn Belt and the South over the last two years, there have been no reports of off-target movement of Enlist Duo® herbicide damaging neighboring crops.

Performance wins advocates
“In the past, tomato growers have had negative experiences with off-target herbicide movement,” says Steve Smith, director of agriculture at Red Gold, Inc., producers of premium-quality tomato products. “They’re concerned about any pesticide that may damage their crop.”

Dow AgroSciences worked with Indiana-based Red Gold to understand the impact of off-target movement. Red Gold provided tomato plants for field trials to assess the performance of Enlist Duo herbicide near susceptible plants. These trials have helped put concerns about drift and volatility to rest.

“I got a firsthand look at Enlist Duo in lab and field work,” Smith says. “It was really impressive. It’s not the old 2,4-D. Dow AgroSciences has a formulation that limits volatility.”

Benefits show up in the field
Farmers who’ve seen applications of Enlist Duo herbicide realize the advantages it offers. In addition to exceptional weed control, they’re getting a product that helps them mitigate concerns about damage to surrounding susceptible plants.

“Growers can control drift by choosing the right conditions, the proper nozzles, boom height and so on,” says Pat Duncanson, a Minnesota farmer. “But we can’t control the weather after application. The only way to control volatility is to choose a herbicide with extremely low volatility.”

The herbicide that impresses Duncanson is Enlist Duo.

“I’ve seen how stable the Enlist Duo platform is,” says Duncanson, who has attended demonstrations and has tried the Enlist system on his own farm. “Enlist Duo will stay where you put it.”

Widening industry confidence
Smith saw the precision of Enlist Duo® herbicide during trials that placed Red Gold tomatoes next to Enlist soybeans. Enlist Duo was sprayed right next to the tomatoes, and there was no impact on the tomato plants. This collaboration helped show how effective Enlist Duo is at staying on target.

“I was very appreciative of how Dow AgroSciences went about working with us and understanding our concerns,” Smith says. “They opened a dialogue. That’s not normal anymore. I am very appreciative of how Dow AgroSciences is doing business.”

Help customers understand the benefits of Enlist Duo by visiting Enlist.com.

Enlist soybeans growing next to Red Gold tomatoes

When Enlist Duo® herbicide was sprayed on Enlist soybeans growing right next to Red Gold tomatoes, there was no impact on the tomato plants. This field trial shows how effective Enlist Duo is at staying on target.

®™DOW Diamond, Colex-D, Enlist and Enlist Duo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

 

Keep fields clean to produce more bushels

When choosing inputs, farmers need to feel confident they are making a decision that will result in maximum ROI at the end of the season. While unsteady commodity prices may tempt your customers to lower their weed control investment, allowing soybeans to compete with weeds throughout the season will steal dollars at harvest.

“We need to make sure we’re doing everything we can to produce bushels,” says Jeff Moon, market development specialist, Dow AgroSciences. “Starting with a sound herbicide program is one of those things that’s going to help us do that.”

Soybean farmers can start with Sonic® herbicide in spring to protect their yield potential in fall. Sonic can be applied preemergence up to three days postplant for long-lasting residual control to prevent broadleaf weeds from invading soybean fields.

Watch this video for tips on how your customers can maximize their return on investment this spring. Plus, visit OperationCleanFields.com for weekly articles and agronomic videos to help your customers battle their toughest weeds this season.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

6 tips to build a weed management program

Following a program approach to weed control can help farmers control the weeds that challenge crops this year while preserving the effectiveness of herbicide technologies into the future. Retailers can help farmers develop a well-thought-out weed control program that can help them achieve successful weed control, improved yield and higher profits in years to come.

Jonathan Siebert, Ph.D., Dow AgroSciences Enlist field sales leader, offers these six tips that retailers can consider when helping customers with weed control strategies.

  1. Know the field history. “It’s important to reference the past, especially the previous year, when laying out a weed control program,” Siebert says. “If a field harbors marestail or Palmer amaranth, you’ll need to select herbicides that are effective against those species.”
  2. Start with a clean seedbed. “Your goal should be to have no weeds in the field at planting,” Siebert says. “Most fields benefit from a burndown program that can include effective herbicides such as glyphosate and new 2,4-D choline, the ingredients in Enlist Duo herbicide.”
  3. Use herbicides with residual activity. “Adding residual herbicides at burndown, preemergence or both can provide additional modes of action that help control weeds in the current year and preserve the efficacy of our postemergence herbicide technologies,” Siebert says.
  4. Rotate modes of action. “To prevent the development of herbicide resistance, we need to rotate the modes of action available to us,” Siebert says. “Weed control needs to be prescriptive: We must scout fields and, when weeds emerge, hit them with postemergence herbicides, remembering to rotate modes of action.”
  5. Keep the borders of fields clean. Siebert suggests farmers make sure they’re controlling weeds in ditches and turn rows to prevent weed escapes. Weeds in these areas can develop resistance because they’ve avoided exposure to full rates of effective herbicides.
  6. Adopt a zero-tolerance policy. Controlling weeds effectively throughout the growing season is essential to curbing the expansion of herbicide resistance.

“We have to be good stewards,” Siebert emphasizes. “Longevity of our herbicide technologies is key to effective long-term weed control.”

Siebert says growers may need to pull rogue weeds to keep those that escape herbicides from eventually overwhelming technologies. “The best practice is to keep the farm free of weeds,” he says. “A field that’s clean helps protect more of the yield potential of every seed we plant.”

The fate of glyphosate is a lesson agriculture can’t forget. “As glyphosate has become less of a silver bullet, it’s had a negative impact on economics and profitability,” Siebert says. “Abusing and losing weed management tools costs time and money. With tight margins, farmers need to do all they can to maximize yield and profits by keeping weeds from shrinking income.”

Sound weed management plans — with retailers providing assistance to customers as they develop these plans — is vital to boosting farmers’ opportunities for long-term profitability.

“We need to be proactive in our approach to weed control,” Siebert says. “Weed control and resistance management take a long-term commitment just like soil fertility requires a long-term view. We have to look five or 10 years down the road. Successful weed management can help farmers achieve long-term productivity.”

tractor spraying herbicide

Rotating herbicide modes of action can help growers achieve better weed control with the current crop while also helping sustain effective herbicide technologies for use in coming years.

®™Enlist and Enlist Duo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Protect your crop with nitrogen maximizers

Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers can increase the amount of time nitrogen is in the ammonium form and increase your revenue too. The active ingredient in Instinct and N-Serve inhibits the nitrification process by inhibiting Nitrosomonas bacteria to keep nitrogen in the ammonium form longer for crops to use, increasing nitrogen retention by 28 percent.1

Corn can take up and use nitrogen when in the nitrate form, but the nitrate form is susceptible to loss through leaching and denitrification. Instinct and N-Serve inhibit nitrification — the conversion of ammonium to nitrates — keeping nitrogen in the ammonium form longer, leading to more readily available nitrogen. The delay in the nitrification process allows for better root development in the plants during critical growth stages and for more efficient nitrogen uptake.

Regardless of fertilizer type, or whether farmers apply nitrogen early or split-apply with sidedress applications, using a proven product to protect your customers’ nitrogen investment is critical for crop growth and yield.

Instinct is used with UAN, urea and liquid manure, while N-Serve is used with anhydrous ammonia in spring, fall and sidedress applications.

Instinct and N-Serve work below the soil’s surface to extend nitrogen availability up to eight weeks in soil temperatures above 50 F for maximum crop growth and profit. 

In addition to extending nitrogen availability, the active ingredient in Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers supports environmental stewardship efforts by reducing leaching into groundwater by 16 percent and decreasing greenhouse gases up to 51 percent.1    

For more information about protecting your customers’ nitrogen, visit NitrogenMaximizers.com or contact your Dow AgroSciences sales rep.

1Wolt, J. D. 2004. A meta-evaluation of nitrapyrin agronomic and environmental effectiveness with emphasis on corn production in the midwestern USA. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst. 69: 23–41. doi:10.1023/B:FRES.0000025287.52565.

Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers inhibit nitrification — the conversion of ammonium to nitrates — keeping nitrogen in the ammonium form longer, leading to more readily available nitrogen for crops to use.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

 

U.S. EPA denies activist petition and retains all Chlorpyrifos tolerances

On Oct. 30, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a proposal to revoke U.S. food tolerances for the insecticide chlorpyrifos. This proposal was an outcome of a 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision ordering EPA to respond to allegations about chlorpyrifos in a 2007 petition from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Pesticide Action Network North America (PANNA), even before the agency had finished its formal health and safety evaluations of the product underway in registration review.

On Nov. 17, 2016, the EPA released a Notice of Data Availability (NODA) with accompanying assessments to notify the public of the data that the agency may use to support its proposed decision to revoke all chlorpyrifos tolerances. Both of these releases by EPA offered the opportunity for public comment and many comments were submitted in support of retaining chlorpyrifos tolerances from universities, stakeholders, growers and customers in the ensuing comment periods. Dow AgroSciences also submitted a comprehensive response to both EPA releases.

On March 29, 2017, the U.S. EPA announced that it would not proceed forward at this time with any restrictions for chlorpyrifos or changes to U.S. tolerances. In addition, EPA has notified the courts that it is denying the NGO petition in full. Instead, EPA announced that it will focus its attention on updating and revising its human health assessment for chlorpyrifos under the standard procedures of the Registration Review process scheduled for completion Oct. 1, 2022, in order to support future decision-making.

Dow AgroSciences believes the science and established legal and regulatory standards and processes support the EPA decision to deny the activist petition and retain all chlorpyrifos tolerances. Dow AgroSciences remains confident that authorized uses of chlorpyrifos products offer wide margins of protection for human health and safety. This is the right decision for farmers who, in about 100 countries, rely on the effectiveness of chlorpyrifos to protect more than 50 crops from damaging insect pests, some of which can only be effectively controlled with chlorpyrifos. Dow AgroSciences will continue to cooperate with EPA under the established Registration Review process in its scientific review of this important crop protection solution.

Phil Jost signature
Phil Jost
Dow AgroSciences
U.S. Insecticides Marketing Leader