Monthly Archives: October 2015

Keep nitrogen below ground this fall

Tiffany Dean
Product Manager, Nitrogen Stabilizers
Dow AgroSciences

Do your customers know what happens to their nitrogen once they apply it? Midwest growers are increasingly concerned about nitrogen loss due to leaching, which is the escape of nitrogen below ground. When discussing nitrogen applications with your customers, be sure they understand what happens to nitrogen when it is lost and what they can do to protect it. 

When it comes to nitrogen loss, the root zone is critically important. Only 30 percent of nitrogen loss occurs above the surface, meaning the majority of loss occurs below ground. Nitrogen in the nitrate form can be lost through leaching (carried away by rainwater and irrigation) and denitrification (converted by other microbes to nitrogen gas and lost to the air).

While some products can protect against surface volatility, they won’t slow the bacteria that converts nitrogen from its ammonium form to its nitrate form. Nitrapyrin, the active ingredient in Instinct® II and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers, acts to slow the conversion of ammonium nitrogen to nitrate, which prevents leaching below the surface.

In a trial on Nov. 1, 2013, in Clarion, Iowa, N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizer was applied at 32 oz./A. This photo was taken almost nine months later, on July 24, 2014, and shows the difference in quality between a field treated with N-Serve (left) and an untreated field (right).

A fall application with a nitrogen source allows more time for organic matter to break down so more nitrogen is available for plant uptake. Customers applying anhydrous ammonia this fall can use N‑Serve to protect their nitrogen applications. Instinct II is available to use with applications of urea, manure or UAN.

 Talk with your customers about protecting nitrogen this fall so it’s available in spring. For more information, visit nitrogenstabilizers.com.

 

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct II is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2015 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Plan now to control winter annual weeds after harvest

Winter annual weeds can emerge soon after harvest, and it’s important to scout for them to determine whether a fall herbicide program is necessary. Here are a few questions to ask going into fall.

What type of winter annual weeds are most common in your customers’ fields? The most difficult winter annual weeds across the Corn Belt include marestail, henbit, purple deadnettle and chickweed. These weeds are becoming more common as growers have switched to no-till production.

Marestail emerges in fall or early spring as a rosette. Apply a fall herbicide to keep fields clean going into winter.

Marestail emerges in fall or early spring as a rosette. Apply a fall herbicide to keep fields clean going into winter.

When should weeds be controlled? There is a good chance weeds emerging in the fall will become a problem in spring. Look at weed density. A high weed density in fall is a good indication that control measures are needed before winter.

How are winter annual weeds best managed? A fall herbicide program can mitigate weed pressure before spring. Using a fall burndown with a residual herbicide such as SureStart® II herbicide can help keep weeds at bay over winter and into spring so the crop gets a clean start at planting.

For more information on controlling winter annual weeds, visit GetMoreTime.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. SureStart II is not registered for sale or use in all states. SureStart II is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2015 Dow AgroSciences LLC

On-target application of Enlist Duo™ herbicide provides growers confidence

Growers take pride in keeping fields clean and being good neighbors. Physical drift (the movement of spray particles) and volatility (vapor drift) can harm neighboring crops during herbicide application.  The Enlist™ Weed Control System featuring Enlist Duo™ herbicide helps growers effectively control weeds while being good neighbors.

“The day we sprayed our field with Enlist Duo herbicide, we had an approximately 8- to 10-mile-per-hour wind,” says Mike Pietzyk, Nebraska grower. “You could not tell there was any breeze behind the sprayer. There was no drift. The spray came out of the sprayer boom and fell right to the ground.”

Enlist Duo herbicide offers Colex-D™ Technology, providing growers the benefits of near-zero volatility and minimized potential for physical drift. Colex-D Technology is a breakthrough innovation resulting from a new 2,4-D choline, the latest formulation science and a proprietary manufacturing process.

Designed to land and stay on target, Enlist Duo is 99 percent less volatile than a mix of DGA dicamba and glyphosate — the active ingredients in Roundup Xtend™ herbicide. And Enlist Duo is up to 96 percent less volatile than 2,4-D ester.

In this video, Pietzyk and other growers share their commitment to being good neighbors. The video explains how Enlist Duo herbicide stayed on target during application to deliver exceptional weed control and “good neighbor” peace of mind.

For more information, visit Enlist.com or watch what other growers had to say about their experience with the Enlist system.

™Colex-D, Enlist, Enlist Duo and the Enlist Logo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Always follow IRM, grain marketing and all other stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Roundup Ready® crops contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate herbicides. Glyphosate herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. B.t. products may not yet be registered in all states. Check with your seed representative for the registration status in your state. ®™Roundup Ready and Roundup Xtend are trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC. Enlist Duo herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2015 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Minnesota grower uses Sonic® herbicide to keep fields clean

Grower Scott Johnson of Starbuck, Minnesota, switched to Sonic® herbicide to manage glyphosate resistance and control troublesome broadleaf weeds in his fields. Sonic extended the spray window later in the season by keeping weeds small and easier to control.

With the residual control of Sonic, Johnson is able to control his most difficult weeds, including ragweed and lambsquarters, throughout the season.

“We definitely recommend using a preemerge herbicide on soybeans just because it allows the bigger spray windows and then it controls those broadleaves so much better later in the season,” Johnson says.

For more information on keeping weeds at bay, visit BattleWeeds.com.

Sonic

 

 

 

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2015 Dow AgroSciences LLC

A look back at Farm Progress Show

Dow AgroSciences helped growers at this year’s Farm Progress Show by showcasing tools to grow their field of dreams. More than 12,000 Farm Progress Show attendees visited the Dow AgroSciences tent during the three-day event in September in Decatur, Illinois. Visitors learned about tools and technology that will help them grow successful crops next season.

The Dow AgroSciences tent featured a baseball theme with the tagline “Grow your field of dreams.” Designed like a baseball field, the tent featured six games, and attendees were encouraged to visit each game to collect prizes and talk with Dow AgroSciences representatives.

This event provided an opportunity to discuss 2015 growing conditions and plans for 2016 with growers from around the world. For more information about which crop protection products to recommend to your customers, contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

In the Dow AgroSciences tent, baseball-themed games educated visitors about the trait, herbicide, insecticide and nitrogen stabilizer offerings to grow optimized crops in 2016.

“Grow your field of dreams” was the theme of this year’s Dow AgroSciences tent at Farm Progress Show.

fps-peters

Luke Peters, corn herbicides product manager, engages with booth visitors trying their hand at the strikeout game promoting Resicore™ herbicide.

fps-game

Knock out weeds and pests in soybeans with Dow AgroSciences’ leading herbicide and insecticide portfolios.

fps-enlist

Many growers learned about the advantages of the Enlist™ Weed Control System.

fps-nstab

Remind your customers to keep nitrogen in the root zone where it belongs by using a nitrogen stabilizer such as Instinct® II or N-Serve®. 

®™DOW Diamond, Cobalt, Enlist, Instinct, N-Serve, Resicore, Sonic, Surveil and Transform are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Cobalt is a federally Restricted Use Pesticide. Cobalt, Instinct II, Sonic, Surveil and Transform WG are not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Resicore is not yet registered with the U.S. EPA. Federal registration is pending. The information presented here is intended to provide technical information only and is not an offer for sale of Resicore. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2015 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Protect your customers’ largest input investment

If your customers saw nitrogen deficiency in their corn crop this season, talk with them about using a nitrogen stabilizer to protect their fertilizer investment next season. Based on data from the 2015 Purdue Crop Cost & Return Guide, as depicted in the following chart, fertilizer is the most expensive input for growers and should be protected.grower-expenditures-corn-chart

Many growers are making nitrogen management a priority to protect their fertilizer investment, which is their greatest input each season.

If corn can’t absorb enough nitrogen through the soil, the plant will cannibalize its own internal sources of nitrogen. When that happens, weakened cornstalks, stalk rot and significantly reduced yield potential often follow. Stabilizing nitrogen in the soil using Instinct® II or N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers can help crops grow healthy and strong.

Talk to your customers about protecting nitrogen this fall so it’s available in spring. For more information about keeping nitrogen below ground, visit NitrogenStabilizers.com.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct II is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2015 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weed of the Month: Chickweed

chickweedChickweed germinates in late fall and completes its life cycle the following spring and summer, just in time to interfere with planting. Read the latest news on chickweed and find weed management information from Dow AgroSciences field scientist Scott Ditmarsen.

  • Various types: Common1
  • Scientific name: Stellaria media1
  • Grass or broadleaf: Broadleaf
  • Found in: Found in all 50 states — USDA map
  • Germination timing: Chickweed is a winter annual broadleaf weed that typically germinates in the fall, overwinters, flowers and produces seed, completing its life cycle the following spring and summer, says Scott Ditmarsen, field scientist, Dow AgroSciences. With the rise in soil temperatures, the winter annual life cycle of chickweed can extend throughout the spring, summer and fall.
  • Competitiveness: Each plant produces 2,500 to 15,000 seeds.2 Chickweed can form dense mats in the fall and early spring. This causes soils to remain cool and wet, which can interfere with and delay planting. Chickweed also can compete with the crop during germination and early season growth, Ditmarsen says.

Fast facts:

  • A distinguishing characteristic of chickweed is the single lengthwise line of fine white hairs on one side of the stem that alternates sides above and below each node. Stems are prostrate to semi-erect, resulting in a low-growing and horizontally spreading growth pattern. Chickweed flowers are small, with five two-lobed, white petals, giving the appearance of 10 tiny petals, Ditmarsen says.
    • Common chickweed seedlings are light green or yellow-green.2
  • Chickweed is typically more of a problem in reduced or no-till systems and in the central and southern Midwest.

Resistance Statistics:*

According to WeedScience.org:

  • Herbicide classes

*Resistance confirmation does not necessarily include all weeds and may vary among different areas of each state.

Weed management tips:

According to Ditmarsen:

  • Scout fields in early fall to detect chickweed populations and other winter annual weed species, especially in reduced or no-till operations.
  • Control chickweed by late winter or early spring with a fall or spring burndown application.
  • Use a preemergence residual herbicide with a burndown application. A residual herbicide can extend the period of control; however, be sure to check product labels for plant-back intervals and restrictions.

Dow AgroSciences weed control solutions:

Corn

SureStart® II herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide

FulTime® NXT herbicide
Surpass® NXT herbicide 
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo™ herbicide, as part of the Enlist™ Weed Control System

Soybean

Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide 
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo™ herbicide, as part of the Enlist™ Weed Control System

Additional information:

More information can be found through these weed science resources:

1U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources and Conservation Service. 2015. Plant Profile: Stellaria media (L.) Vill., common chickweed. http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=STME2
2Wertz, B. A. 2015. Common Chickweed. http://extension.psu.edu/pests/weeds/weed-id/common-chickweed

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are federally Restricted Use Pesticides. Duramax, Durango DMA, Enlist Duo herbicide, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Sonic, SureStart II, Surpass NXT and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, SureStart II and Surpass  NXT are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2015 Dow AgroSciences LLC