Monthly Archives: January 2016

Get the most out of every corn acre in 2016

Luke Peters
Product Manager, Corn Herbicides
Dow AgroSciences

luke-peters-post

Yield potential may be at risk soon after weeds emerge and begin competing with corn crops. A strong weed management program can help ensure your customers’ corn plants are not being robbed of the moisture, sunlight and nutrients they need for healthy growth.

Here are three things to keep in mind going into next year:

  1. Stop weeds before they start. The best time to control a weed is before it is out of the ground. Remind your customers about the value of a preemergence herbicide with residual control to combat early season weed pressure.
  2.  Scout for weeds to stay successful. It’s important to scout fields before and after planting. Identify and document which weed species emerge in the field. Proper identification can help determine what level of control is needed.
  3.  Recommend a herbicide that is proven to perform. A herbicide program that includes a preemergence herbicide followed by a postemergence application is proven to be more effective than using glyphosate alone. Field research shows an average of 7.7 percent additional corn yield potential by using a two-pass system with SureStart® II herbicide as the residual herbicide before a glyphosate application.*

For your customers who contended with troublesome weeds such as waterhemp, marestail and giant ragweed this season, a residual herbicide such as SureStart II can help control more than 60 tough broadleaf weeds and grasses next season. Applied preemergence up to 11-inch corn, SureStart II has three nonglyphosate modes of action that manage herbicide-resistant weeds for optimized yield potential.

Dow AgroSciences is excited to bring new weed control solutions to your customers in 2016. Pending regulatory approval, Resicore™ herbicide will be a residual corn herbicide option to help your customers control resistant weeds deep into the growing season.

Help your customers get the most out of every corn acre next season. Visit GetMoreTime.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative for more information.

surestart-field

A residual herbicide, such as SureStart® II, reduces early season weed competition so corn can get a strong start.

*Data collected from university field trials spanning 10 states from 2010 to 2013.

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. SureStart II is not registered for sale or use in all states. SureStart II is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Resicore is not yet registered with the U.S. EPA. Federal registration is pending. The information presented here is intended to provide technical information only and is not an offer for sale of Resicore. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weed-free fields cap successful launch of Enlist Duo® herbicide

This year, growers saw strong stands, good ear length and fill, full pods and weed-free fields as they participated in the stewarded introduction of Enlist™ corn and grew Enlist soybeans for seed production under the Dow AgroSciences Field Forward™ program. As Year 1 of commercial use of Enlist Duo® herbicide with Colex-D® technology concludes, growers share their impressions of the Enlist weed control system.

Exceptional weed control and hybrid performance result in impressive yield

Indiana grower Mike Lewis eagerly planted Enlist corn for an opportunity to control giant ragweed and hard-to-control marestail.

Lewis used a program approach starting with a preemergence application of SureStart® II herbicide followed by Enlist Duo herbicide. He says Enlist Duo provided exceptional weed control through harvest, and the Enlist corn was some of the best he shelled this year, averaging 210 bushels per acre.

“Our corn didn’t have to fight through the weeds, and because of that, we can tell the difference in yield,” Lewis says. “Plant-health wise, even in the middle of October, there were a few leaves of the corn that were still green. There are a lot of positives about the Enlist weed control system, and I’m ready to place my order for next year.”

Clean fields of Enlist soybeans catch neighbors’ attention

Steve Wertish grew Enlist soybeans on his Minnesota farm. With waterhemp and other weed pressure increasing, Wertish wanted to see how the Enlist system would perform in his fields. Wertish liked the weed control, and his clean fields also caught the attention of his neighbors.

“Neighbors have stopped because they saw that our fields were weed-free,” Wertish says. “We’ve told them about our experience and how pleased we are. Now they are ready to plant Enlist soybeans on their farms.”

Growers applaud on-target application of Enlist Duo® herbicide

Enlist Duo herbicide with Colex-D technology provides four key advantages: minimized potential for physical drift, near-zero volatility, improved handling characteristics and low odor.

Lewis planted Enlist corn next to soybeans without the Enlist trait. After applying Enlist Duo, he watched for signs of drift or volatility.

“There was no drift. It didn’t hurt the beans that were planted right beside the Enlist corn,” Lewis says.

On-target application, excellent weed control and good yield have growers like Lewis and Wertish ready to make Enlist part of their weed management program.

For more information about the Enlist weed control system, visit Enlist.com.

Wertish-Field-Forward

Minnesota grower Steve Wertish participated in the Dow AgroSciences Field Forward™ program, growing Enlist™ soybeans for seed production.

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. SureStart II is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Missouri grower controls waterhemp with SureStart® II herbicide

Second-generation farmer Jimmy Daniels of Mendon, Missouri, uses SureStart® II herbicide to control glyphosate-resistant waterhemp in his cornfields. Daniels relies on the three nonglyphosate modes of action found in SureStart II to manage herbicide resistance and keep his fields clean.

“The reason we went to SureStart was because we found out how good it was on waterhemp, and it is,” Daniels says. “Our fields are very clean.”

Daniels works closely with his retailer to make sure he uses products that help him have a clean field at the end of the year. Watch the video below to hear more from Daniels.

For more information about SureStart II, visit GetMoreTime.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. SureStart II is not registered for sale or use in all states. SureStart II is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Surveil® herbicide offers easy mixing and handling characteristics

Agronomist Nicholas Smeby of Long Prairie, Minnesota, recommends a preemergence herbicide on every acre — corn or soybean. To control troublesome weeds such as lambsquarters, waterhemp and ragweed in soybean fields, Smeby’s Dow AgroSciences sales representative introduced him to Surveil® herbicide. Surveil is a preemergence herbicide that keeps weeds small and easier to control.

“This year Surveil comes premixed and so the applicators really appreciate the simplicity of it,” Smeby says.

Along with easy mixing and handling characterstics, Smeby likes that Surveil features multiple modes of action to manage herbicide resistance.

“The importance of a preemerge herbicide on soybeans and multiple modes of action is very evident in this area because of the problem weeds that we have and the fact that the glyphosate does not control everything anymore,” Smeby says. “We’ve got weeds that are completely resistant to glyphosate, so having the multiple modes of action in Surveil has been a great help.”

Learn more about Smeby’s experience with Surveil by watching the video below.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dE-5KjXg-7A]

For more information, visit SurveilHerbicide.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

 ®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Surveil is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weeds to scout for next spring

With the 2016 growing season right around the corner, consider these weed management tips to control high-anxiety weeds, such as lambsquarters, marestail, velvetleaf and waterhemp.

Lambsquarters
More than 20 states have reported herbicide-resistant lambsquarters, according to WeedScience.org. Early scouting of lambsquarters is important as it tends to germinate early in the spring under cooler conditions. A program approach including a soil-applied herbicide followed by a postemergence herbicide application is the most effective strategy to control lambsquarters.

lambsquarters

Marestail
Marestail is believed to be the first glyphosate-resistant weed in a U.S. row-crop setting. Use a residual herbicide to control marestail in spring. A preemergence herbicide will open a wider window to apply a postemergence herbicide to control any remaining marestail. Follow up with a fall application to keep fields clean going into winter, which will mitigate early season pressure the following season.

marestail

Velvetleaf
Velvetleaf can be hard to control with glyphosate alone and continues to show prevalence among row crops. It is easily identified by its distinctive leaf shape and velvety texture, which makes scouting easier; however, scouting must be done early enough to allow for timely application of postemergence herbicides to achieve effective control.

velvetleaf

Waterhemp
Waterhemp produces seeds rapidly. Without competition, waterhemp plants can produce more than 1 million seeds per plant, a number higher than other pigweed species.1 The best path to control waterhemp is aggressive tillage and a program approach involving soil-applied herbicides followed by postemergence herbicide applications using multiple effective modes of action.

waterhemp

For more information on how SureStart® II herbicide can help your customers control more than 60 broadleaf weeds and grasses, visit GetMoreTime.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

1Nordby, D., B. Hartzler, and K. Bradley. Biology and Management of Waterhemp. https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/bp/gwc-13.pdf

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. SureStart II is not registered for sale or use in all states. SureStart II is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Despite rain delays, program approach to control weeds delivers clean fields

Dave Hillger, Ph.D., Enlist™ field specialist, Dow AgroSciences

“Ugly” is the best way to describe the weed challenges growers across Indiana faced in 2015. Particularly in central Indiana, wet field conditions prevented growers from applying preemergence herbicides, resulting in early season weed pressure. Marestail and resistant common ragweed were prevalent, and there were patches of giant ragweed that weren’t controlled or that emerged late.

This year reinforced the value of applying a preemergence herbicide with residual activity. Adam Schwering who farms near Rushville, Indiana, agrees.

“The key to effective weed control is starting with a clean field and putting down preemergence residual herbicides to hold weeds back,” Schwering says. “The field was pretty nasty looking by the time we went in to spray over the top because we just kept getting rain and more rain.”

This season, Schwering experienced the new, break-through technology of the Enlist weed control system and the benefits it offers for controlling resistant and hard-to-control weeds post application.

“Enlist Duo herbicide was very effective and cleaned the field right up,” Schwering says. “I haven’t seen weeds in the field at all, which really surprises me. It is nearly 100 percent weed free.”

Enlist Duo® herbicide is a proprietary blend of new 2,4-D choline and glyphosate. Timely application at full label rates provides an additional mode of action to help control the toughest weeds, including resistant and hard-to-control species.

Despite the effective weed control Schwering experienced with the Enlist system, he cautions other growers not to forget to apply a preemergence herbicide. “The key to effective weed control and preventing future resistance is to start with a clean field. Don’t just expect to use Enlist Duo over the top and clean up weed problems. That’s not good for weeds and it’s not good for us.”

Start planning now

Regardless of the situation in your fields, this year’s experiences illustrate the value of building and carrying out a comprehensive weed control program. As you begin planning for 2016, spend more time on the fields with specific weed issues that weren’t controlled effectively.

It is important to understand the weed types and common resistant species in each field and to build a plan designed to control weeds early. With a plan in place, if changes such as weather delays occur or weed escapes happen, you’ll have an option already in mind.

Take action now to control actively growing weeds with a fall burndown or tillage. And consider rotating prevented-plant acres to corn next year since there are more-aggressive choices available for early season weed control in corn.

Follow a program approach

When planning herbicide strategy, especially in areas with significant resistant populations, follow a program approach that starts with broad-spectrum soil residual herbicides offering multiple modes of action. Preemergence herbicide applications — including a burndown — create a clean field at planting and offer control of early season weeds, eliminating weed competition during the crop’s critical early growth. Sonic® herbicide in soybeans or SureStart® II herbicide in corn are two products to consider for early residual control.

With early season control in place, you’ll have time to plant your entire crop and then come back with timely applications of postemergence weed control. Scout fields to make applications when weeds are small and actively growing. Apply full rates following label directions to ensure optimum control and limit opportunity for resistance to develop.

For more information on the latest herbicide-tolerant trait technology available to help you manage hard-to-control and resistant weeds next year, visit the Enlist YouTube channel, follow on Twitter at @EnlistOnline or visit Enlist.com.

new-technology

Weather challenges in 2015 illustrate the value of building and carrying out a program approach to weed control. With new technology such as the Enlist™ weed control system, timely postemergence applications of Enlist Duo® herbicide at full label rates will help take control of the toughest weeds.

®™Enlist, Enlist Duo, Sonic and SureStart are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo, Sonic and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. SureStart II is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weed of the Month: Henbit

  • Various types: Henbit deadnettle,1 spotted henbit1
  • Scientific name: Lamium amplexicaule L.1
  • Grass or broadleaf: Broadleaf
  • Found in: All 48 contiguous states and Hawaii — USDA map
  • Germination timing: Henbit is a winter annual broadleaf weed that typically emerges in the fall, matures and goes to seed in early spring, says Ralph Lassiter, Enlist field specialist, Dow AgroSciences.
  • Competitiveness: Henbit is a low-growing weed and is not very competitive in soybeans or corn, Lassiter says. Because it is a winter annual, it will begin to die in the spring as temperatures rise. However, in situations where heavy henbit populations cover a field, the weed species can interfere with planting operations, making it important to use a preplant burndown program.
young-henbit

Young henbit

henbit

Henbit has a small purple flower that can turn fields the same lavender shade when heavy infestations occur.

Fast facts:

  • Henbit is a common winter annual in the South. As a member of the mint family, henbit has unique features such as a square stem with scalloped leaves, which are opposite on the stem without a petiole or leaf stem. In the spring, henbit has a small purple flower that can turn fields the same lavender shade when heavy infestations occur, Lassiter says.
  • The plant generally grows 4 to 6 inches tall, but it can get up to 1 foot tall. It prefers sunny spots in moist, fertile soils, but it is adaptable to dry and shady areas.2
  • Henbit is often confused with two other mints: Lamium purpureum(purple deadnettle) and Glecoma hederacea (ground ivy/creeping charlie). The upper leaves on henbit clasp the stem, but the lower leaves have petioles (or stalks) attaching the leaves to the stem. Henbit leaves can appear scalloped, but the upper leaf edges are more jagged.2

Resistance statistics:*

There are no documented cases of herbicide-resistant henbit in corn or soybeans. According to WeedScience.org, henbit has shown resistance to ALS inhibitors (B/2) in Kansas winter wheat.

*Resistance confirmation does not necessarily include all weeds and may vary among different areas of each state.

Weed management tips:

Lassiter says:

  • A herbicide program that includes 2,4-D can provide excellent control of henbit.
  • Because henbit is a winter annual weed, control measures in season are generally not required in corn and soybean fields. However, preplant burndown programs are necessary to start with a clean field and avoid weed interference at planting.
  • Growers should use an appropriate burndown herbicide to start with a clean seedbed. For more herbicide options to control henbit and other weeds, please review the list of weed control solutions below.

Dow AgroSciences weed control solutions:

Corn

SureStart® II herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide

FulTime® NXT herbicide
Surpass® NXT herbicide 
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist™ weed control system

Soybean

Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide 
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist™ weed control system

Additional information:

More information can be found through these weed science resources:

  • Henbit — University of Missouri
  • Henbit — University of Nebraska Extension

1U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources and Conservation Service. 2015. Plant Profile: Lamium amplexicaule L. henbit deadnettle. http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=LAAM
2University of Nebraska Extension. Henbit. http://acreage.unl.edu/Henbit

®™Tradeemark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are federally Restricted Use Pesticides. Duramax, Durango DMA, Enlist Duo herbicide, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Sonic, SureStart II, Surpass NXT and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, SureStart II and Surpass NXT are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC