Monthly Archives: October 2016

A burndown now can mean a clean slate later

Jeff Ellis, Field Scientist, Dow AgroSciences

Jeff Ellis, Field Scientist
Dow AgroSciences

Help your customers take action this fall to start with a clean slate in spring. Tough weeds, such as marestail, can cause problems year-round, often necessitating a fall burndown application in soybean fields.

A burndown application can set no-till or reduced-till growers up for success when spring planting rolls around by eliminating weed pressure that causes issues at planting.

Scouting fields for weeds is the first step to determine if a fall burndown application is right for your customers. Should scouting uncover winter annual weeds, such as marestail, chickweed or henbit, a fall burndown application can help eliminate potential weed competition.

In Midwest fields, marestail is becoming an increasing problem as it can emerge in fall or early spring. Fall-emerged marestail becomes dormant over the winter and rapidly emerges in early spring, begins to flower in July, sets and disperses seed from August to October and then dies.1 This growth pattern coupled with its rapid seed production can cause serious issues for growers because marestail can significantly diminish yield when present at planting.

A fall application of a preemergence herbicide tank-mixed with 2,4-D or glyphosate can be an effective way to ensure fields will start clean in the spring. Sonic® and Surveil® herbicides from Dow AgroSciences are two preemergence options that offer residual control to keep fields cleaner longer.

Pending registration from the U.S. Environment Protection Agency, Elevore herbicide will give growers a chance to elevate their burndown applications. Elevore will provide thorough control of labeled broadleaf weeds, including ALS- and glyphosate-resistant species, plus marestail up to 8 inches tall. Elevore has an anticipated registration of 2017.

Set your customers up for success this season. For more information on fall burndown applications, visit BattleWeeds.com.

1Michigan State University Weed Science website. 2016. Horseweed (Marestail) (Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronq.). http://www.msuweeds.com/worst-weeds/marestail/

®™DOW Diamond, Elevore, Sonic and Surveil are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Elevore is not yet registered with the U.S. EPA. Federal registration is pending. This presentation is intended to provide technical information only and is not an offer for sale of product. Sonic and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Growers report Enlist Duo® herbicide leaves fields clean for harvest

Most growers are managing their farms with an eye on the future. They’re looking for long-term solutions so they can leave their land in better shape for the next generation. They want a weed control program that handles their toughest weeds without harming their crops.

Midwest growers who planted Enlist crops this summer are seeing the benefits of the Enlist weed control system. This new technology is taking weed control to the next level.

“It’s important to be able to get the traits and the technology to keep advancing,” says Steve Bireline, an Iowa grower who planted Enlist corn this summer. Enlist technology is being incorporated into the best genetics packages to bring growers the seed products they need to continue improving productivity.

Clean fields equal yield
Control of weeds can help boost yield. “I think Enlist will help growers be more productive, get higher yield with clean fields,” says Illinois grower Ben Hortenstine, who planted Enlist soybeans as part of the Dow AgroSciences Field Forward program for seed production in 2016.

These growers are seeing clean fields from the combine seat because Enlist Duo® herbicide controls a host of difficult weeds, including species that have developed resistance to some herbicides.

“The significance of Enlist Duo without a doubt is it does an excellent job of controlling the weeds,” Bireline notes. “It took all the competition away from the corn plant. And I think that plant will produce a maximum yield.”

Just as important, Enlist Duo features Colex-D® technology, so applications stay on target.

“Spraying any other herbicide, it always seems like you have the driftable fines behind you,” Hortenstine says. “When we sprayed the Enlist Duo, drift was next to zero. It sprayed straight down to the crop.”

Looking for more
Growers across the Corn Belt are reporting satisfaction and clearly state their intention to continue using this novel technology.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that I would keep using Enlist Duo,” Bireline says.

Click on the video to hear more from these growers about their experiences with the Enlist system. You also can visit the Experiencing Enlist section of Enlist.com to learn more about these and other growers who’ve adopted Enlist technology. Check out our YouTube channel, follow us on Twitter at @EnlistOnline or visit Enlist.com.

harvesting

Growers who’ve used Enlist Duo® herbicide on Enlist corn and soybeans are heading into harvest this year with clean fields, which can help boost their yield.

®™DOW Diamond, Colex-D, Enlist, Enlist Duo, the Enlist Logo and Field Forward are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Protect nitrogen with a proven product

With today’s commodity prices where they are, growers are looking for ways to get the most out of their input investments — especially the most expensive input: nitrogen. In 2015 trials, Instinct® II and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers provided an average 7-bushel-per-acre increase compared with untreated nitrogen.

Excessive rainfall this spring may have put your customers’ most expensive input at risk. Rain before a nitrogen application makes it tough to get across the field, while heavy rain after application can make nitrogen vulnerable to leaching and denitrification. Instinct II and N-Serve reduce leaching into groundwater and denitrification into the atmosphere, keeping nitrogen in the soil longer for corn use.

Research conducted by Dow AgroSciences shows the value of using a nitrogen stabilizer to optimize yield potential regardless of seasonal weather. Instinct II and N-Serve have provided an average 6 bu./A yield increase over the span of seven to eight years; however, 2015 plots treated with the products resulted in an average 7 bu./A yield increase compared with untreated nitrogen, as shown in the charts below.

Effect of Instinct II on 2008-2015 Corn Yields - US

Effect of N-Serve on 2009-2015 Corn Yields - US

Whether your customers apply nitrogen preplant in spring or use a program approach with a sidedress application, help them protect this valuable nutrient with a proven product. For more proof, visit NitrogenStabilizers.com.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct II is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Share the power of Resicore® herbicide with your customers

Harvest is winding down, but that doesn’t mean your workload is getting lighter. As we move through fall, your customers are reflecting on what worked and what didn’t work this season and will soon consult you for 2017 herbicide recommendations. If your customers are seeking greater control of herbicide-resistant weeds in their cornfields, Resicore® herbicide may be a good fit.

Here are five ways Resicore is an effective weed control solution:

  1. Novel, easy-to-use formulation:
    • Resicore includes three leading active ingredients that have never before been featured together in one product. The unique formulation ensures the active ingredients remain in solution and consistently deliver powerful weed control.
  2. Three modes of action:
    • The three modes of action found in Resicore do not contain glyphosate or atrazine. Resicore provides an effective way to control the toughest weeds that may be resistant to glyphosate, atrazine or ALS herbicides.
  3. Long-lasting residual control:
    • Keeping cornfields weed-free is critical to optimize yield. Resicore gives growers extended residual control that lasts deep into the growing season.
  4. Versatility:
    • Resicore has a range of use rates that make it convenient to control weeds from preemergence up to 11-inch-tall corn. Plus, Resicore has the flexibility to be tank-mixed with glyphosate, atrazine and other corn herbicides when needed.
  5. Controls more than 70 broadleaf weeds and grasses:
    • Resicore delivers power over many of the common weeds your customers contend with in the Midwest. These include waterhemp, marestail, giant ragweed, Palmer amaranth and more.

For powerful examples of how Resicore works in cornfields, visit PowerOverWeeds.com or contact your Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

Nebraska field

Nebraska field shown seven weeks after preemergence application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide and 1 qt./A atrazine.

South Dakota field

South Dakota field shown five weeks after preemergence application of 2.5 qt./A Resicore® herbicide.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Resicore is not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

When should your customers apply nitrogen?

Each year, your customers consider many factors when deciding when nitrogen should be applied. Complicating the decision are those who call into question research data documenting the effectiveness of fall applications.

“There are a number of reasons why we do fall fertilizer applications,” says Eric Scherder, field scientist, Ph.D., Dow AgroSciences. “One consideration is infrastructure. If every farmer was forced to apply in the spring, we wouldn’t have the equipment or product available to meet the demand.”

Time and weather are also big factors since the number of days fit for fieldwork in the spring are usually limited. Another important factor from an economic perspective is that growers can often take advantage of more favorable fertilizer pricing in the fall, Scherder says.

Environmental concerns resulting from nitrate leaching and denitrification — regardless of whether nitrogen is fall- or spring-applied — also complicate the equation. Because all nitrogen sources are, by nature, very mobile and susceptible to loss, there are inherent risks.

“When considering fall fertilizer applications, there are certain nitrogen sources like liquid UAN that are probably not the right source for that time,” Scherder says. “A fall anhydrous application is more common, although risks still remain. Regardless of the form of nitrogen, we recommend growers use a nitrogen stabilizer such as N-Serve or Instinct II with fall nitrogen applications.”

Studies from Dow AgroSciences with N-Serve® and Instinct® II nitrogen stabilizers show soil nitrogen retention increased by 28 percent and nitrogen leaching decreased by almost 16 percent. N-Serve and Instinct II also have been proven to provide an average 7-bushel-per-acre increase compared with untreated acres by keeping more nitrogen in the root zone for crops to use.*

Regardless of whether Mother Nature shines favorably on fall applications or decides to halt things until next spring, maximizing profit by minimizing nitrogen loss and supporting sustainability by reducing nitrate loss should always be top of mind.

For more information about protecting fall-applied nitrogen, visit NitrogenStabilizers.com.

*Average 7-bushel yield return vs. nontreated acres from 2015 trials.

nitrogen application

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow.
Instinct II is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

How do you measure perfect?

company-button

Farm Progress Show attendees at the Dow AgroSciences tent were encouraged to pick a button displaying what perfect means to them.

How do you measure perfect? Whether it’s striving for the ideal crop or operation, the definition of perfect is unique to every grower and retailer.

Dow AgroSciences encouraged attendees at the 2016 Farm Progress Show in Boone, Iowa, to display what perfect means to them. Whether continuing a tradition, doing the right thing, caring for the land or feeding the world, attendees were invited to pick a button to show their idea of perfect.

For Dow AgroSciences, the measure of perfect is a continuous push to find solutions to help growers achieve their individual goals for their operations.

Through cutting-edge technology and a dedicated sales force, Dow AgroSciences is constantly pushing to bring innovative solutions to growers.

Weed control solutions to fit every acre
For corn growers, Dow AgroSciences launched Resicore® herbicide in early 2016 to get power over weeds. Resicore is a novel, easy-to-use formulation featuring three leading active ingredients and three modes of action to deliver powerful broad-spectrum control of more than 70 broadleaf weeds and annual grasses. Resicore gives growers a new and effective way to control the toughest weeds.

Soybean growers looking to control weeds such as marestail, giant ragweed or Palmer amaranth also have options from Dow AgroSciences. Helping growers continue the drive toward perfect, Sonic® and Surveil® preemergence soybean herbicides have multiple modes of action to control weeds in different ways. With long-lasting residual control, Sonic and Surveil keep yield-robbing weeds at bay for optimized yield potential.

Postemergence weed control options are increasingly limited due to resistance issues. The Enlist weed control system takes postemergence weed control to a whole new level. The Enlist system advances herbicide and trait technologies — combining the proven control of a new 2,4‑D and glyphosate in Enlist Duo® herbicide. Enlist soybeans offer a third tolerance to glufosinate.

Nitrogen management solutions
In addition to controlling troublesome weeds, many corn growers make a significant investment in nitrogen fertilizer. Instinct® II and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers work below ground to keep nitrogen in the root zone where corn needs it. Instinct II and N-Serve are proven to provide an average 7-bushel-per-acre increase compared with untreated acres by slowing the nitrification process.*

N-Serve can be applied with anhydrous ammonia. Instinct II protects nitrogen when applied with UAN, urea and liquid manure. Both products are proven to perform in fall or spring.

For a full list of Dow AgroSciences product offerings to help achieve your customers’ perfect season, visit DowAgro.com.

*Average 7-bushel yield return vs. nontreated acres from 2015 trials.

Dow AgroSciences tent

What perfect mean to you

Dow AgroSciences invited Farm Progress Show attendees to grab a button to describe what “perfect” means to them. From tradition to the land to family, everyone’s perfect looks different, and Dow AgroSciences is there to help growers achieve their vision of perfect.

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow.
Enlist Duo, Instinct II, Resicore, Sonic and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weed of the Month: Palmer amaranth

  • Palmer amaranthCommon name: Palmer pigweed
  • Scientific name: Amaranthus palmeri
  • Grass or broadleaf: Annual broadleaf
  • Is native to the southwestern United States, has become a devastating weed problem in the South and has recently spread to the upper Midwest.
  • Most competitive and aggressive pigweed species. Season-long competition by Palmer amaranth at 2.5 plants per foot of row can reduce soybean yield by as much as 79 percent.1
  • Emerges later than many summer-annual broadleaf weeds, continues to emerge throughout the growing season and can grow 2 to 5 inches in three days or less.
  • A single female Palmer amaranth plant can produce approximately 600,000 seeds.
  • Ranked the most troublesome weed in the United States by the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) for 2016.

A fact that may surprise you …

 The leaves, stems and seeds of Palmer amaranth are edible and highly nutritious; and the plants were once widely cultivated and eaten by Native Americans across North America, both for the abundant seeds and as a cooked or dried green vegetable.

Fast facts from Jeff Ellis, Ph.D., field scientist, Dow AgroSciences

To correctly identify Palmer amaranth when scouting, look for the following plant-distinguishing features:

  • The petioles, especially on older leaves, will be as long or longer than the leaf blade itself.
  • Plants sometimes — but not always — have a white V-shaped watermark on leaves. If a watermark is present, this rules out other members of the pigweed family.
  • Leaf shape on Palmer amaranth plants are wider than other pigweed species and ovate to diamond shape.
  • Individual plants are either male or female, which forces outcrossing and genetic diversity. This gives Palmer amaranth the ability to adapt and quickly produce resistance genes to single-mode-of-action herbicides.

Resistance statistics*

  • According to WeedScience.org, herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth has been documented in corn and soybean fields in 24 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin.
  • Since the late 1980s, Palmer amaranth has evolved resistance to six herbicide sites of action: ALS inhibitors (Group 2); microtubule inhibitors (Group 3); Photosystem II inhibitors (Group 5); EPSP synthase inhibitors (Group 9); HPPD inhibitors (Group 27); and, most recently documented in Arkansas and Mississippi, protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) inhibitors (Group 14).

*Resistance confirmation does not necessarily include all weeds and may vary among different areas of each state.

Palmer amaranth control/management tips:

Ellis says:

  • In both corn and soybeans, aim to control Palmer amaranth before plants emerge by using a residual herbicide.
  • Tank-mix residual herbicides with postemergence herbicides to prevent Palmer amaranth from emerging later in the season.
  • Palmer amaranth germinates throughout the season, so it is important to “layer” residual herbicides.
  • Growers, especially for soybeans, should always use residual herbicides and avoid having to control Palmer amaranth after emergence because there are very few effective postemergence herbicide control options.

General tips to manage herbicide-resistant weeds

Growers in the Midwest and Midsouth face some of the toughest weed species, including Palmer amaranth, waterhemp, ragweed and marestail. Taking the following steps during the season can help them manage weed resistance issues:

  • Develop an integrated weed management plan that delivers multiple modes of action throughout the season. With resistance increasing, the Enlist weed control system may allow use of effective postemergence modes of action, including glufosinate in soybeans and a new 2,4-D in corn and soybeans.
  • Use full rates of the herbicides during applications. Do not use partial rates or trim back for any reason, including cost.
  • Spray when weeds are small. Although it can be challenging because of weather and other factors, this is the ideal application timing.
  • Scout fields regularly to identify weeds when they are small and easy to control.

Dow AgroSciences weed control solutions:

Corn
SureStart® II herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide 

FulTime® NXT herbicide
Surpass® NXT herbicide 
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system

Soybeans
Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system

Additional information:
More information can be found through these weed science resources:

Palmer Amaranth Biology, Identification and Management — Purdue University Extension

Guidelines for the Identification and Management of Palmer Amaranth in Illinois Agronomic Crops — University of Illinois Department of Crop Science

Palmer Amaranth Identified in Nine Iowa Counties — Iowa State University Extension and Outreach/Integrated Crop Management

1United Soybean Board. 2013. Palmer Amaranth Management in Soybeans. http://takeactiononweeds.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/palmer-amaranth-management-in-soybeans.pdf

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are federally Restricted Use Pesticides. Duramax, Durango DMA, Enlist Duo, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II, Surpass NXT and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore, SureStart II and Surpass NXT are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2016 Dow AgroSciences LLC