Monthly Archives: January 2020

New year, new content for Inputs & Insights

By: Nicholas Dame, U.S. Product Manager, Fungicides, Corteva Agriscience       

Nicholas Dame

Three Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • Inputs & Insights will include articles about crop disease and fungicides going forward.
  • There will be a new column called “Disease of the Month” to highlight a different disease in each newsletter.
  • You’ll be able to find tips to properly scout for — and control — crop disease in upcoming newsletters.

As we begin a new year, you can expect new content from Inputs & Insights. That new content will include articles about crop disease and the benefits of fungicides, as well as a new column called “Disease of the Month.”

Crop Disease
We decided to start including this content in 2020, because crop disease is a very serious topic that you need to be discussing with your customers each year. There are dozens of diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes that can attack crops like corn and soybeans. If left untreated, these diseases can have serious, detrimental impacts on your customers’ yield.

These diseases can develop across the Midwest when the timing and weather conditions are right. Our goal is to give you a deeper understanding of crop disease, how to scout for it, how to prevent it and, ultimately, how to treat it.

New Content
Going forward you can expect content in Inputs & Insights aimed at giving you that deeper understanding. First, you’ll find a “Disease of the Month” column in each edition of the newsletter, which will be similar to the well-known “Weed of the Month” column. “Disease of the Month” will focus on one disease that is commonly found in the Midwest during the growing season, what symptoms to look for, what conditions are needed for the disease to develop, advice to manage the disease and more.

In addition to the new column, the industry and product news articles will be periodically devoted to crop disease and fungicide solutions from Corteva Agriscience. The articles will offer advice like tips to successfully scout for crop disease and best practices on how to properly apply fungicides.

DuPont Aproach® Prima fungicide
I’d also like to take this opportunity to introduce you and your customers to DuPont Aproach® Prima fungicide from Corteva. Aproach Prima is a powerful fungicide that can be used to control diseases in corn, soybeans and wheat. The product offers two, strong modes of action, both preventive and curative, and has been shown to increase yield in corn, soybeans and wheat. I recommend you discuss Aproach Prima with you customers this growing season.

To learn more about the fungicide, visit AproachPrima.Corteva.US. And be on the lookout for more articles in Inputs & Insights featuring Aproach Prima, how to use it and how it can help your growers this year.

About the author: Nicholas Dame is the U.S. product manager for fungicides, Corteva Agriscience, based in Indianapolis. He was previously a territory manager for Corteva Agriscience. Nicholas earned a bachelor’s degree in agriculture economics from the University of Kentucky.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Aproach Prima may not be registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Contact your local Corteva Agriscience sales representative for details and availability. Always refer to the product labels for complete details and directions for use. © 2020 Corteva.

Help customers take advantage of combination of Enlist™ Herbicides and Liberty® Herbicide

Three Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • The combination of Enlist One® + Liberty® herbicides gives growers exceptional control of tough weeds.
  • Using multiple herbicide sites of action also helps prevent the development of resistant weeds.
  • Retailers can help customers combine these effective herbicides to provide industry-leading postemergence weed control.

To give farmers the best control of tough and resistant weeds, Corteva Agriscience and BASF recommend using Liberty® and Enlist One® herbicides on Enlist E3 soybean and Enlist cotton acres. These two leading herbicides offer exceptional control of broadleaf weeds including waterhemp, pigweed, kochia, marestail and ragweed species.

“The combination of Enlist One plus Liberty herbicide is lights out on tough pigweed and waterhemp,” says Shawna Hubbard, Trait Herbicide Product Manager, Corteva Agriscience. “Using both products postemergence will help farmers get the cleanest fields they’ve seen in years in areas infested with tough weeds. That’s why Liberty herbicide is now Corteva’s recommended glufosinate for use with the Enlist weed control system.”

Better control via multiple modes of action
Enlist E3 soybeans and Enlist cotton give farmers flexibility in their herbicide selection with tolerance to 2,4-D choline in Enlist herbicides, glufosinate in Liberty herbicide, and glyphosate. This allows farmers and applicators to employ multiple herbicide sites of action.

Growers have trusted Liberty herbicide to deliver consistent weed control with its unique patented formulation. It has consistently controlled broadleaves and grasses on millions of acres for many years and has no known resistance in U.S. row crops.

Retailers can help their customers understand how using Enlist and Liberty herbicides on the same acre delivers superior weed control while helping sustain the long-term efficacy of both herbicides. Remind farmers they have flexibility, with options to spray these two products at one time using a tank mix of Enlist One plus Liberty herbicide or in planned sequential passes of Liberty herbicide and Enlist Duo herbicide. 

BASF and Corteva are committed to ongoing research and trial work to use Liberty herbicide and Enlist herbicides on Enlist crops. These consistent efforts help farmers achieve clean fields and adapt to the ever-changing landscape to control weeds on their farm. The involvement of both companies promotes continued training of retailers and other parties in the proper stewardship of both herbicides in fields and on targeted weed species.

In Enlist E3 soybean and Enlist cotton fields, farmers can adopt a program approach that includes starting with effective residuals followed by Enlist One and Liberty herbicides. The goal is to provide more options to keep fields weed free all summer long.

This also helps curb the development of resistant weeds and sustain the long-term viability of these technologies. According to University of Illinois research, selection for glyphosate-resistant waterhemp within 4 to 6 years was 83% less likely in a field where 2.5 modes of action were used than in a field where only 1.5 modes of action were used.

The inherent stability of 2,4-D choline means adding Liberty® herbicide in the tank with Enlist One® herbicide does not increase the potential for volatility due to acidification. Retailers, applicators and farmers also can feel confident about adding qualified AMS products listed on EnlistTankMix.com to optimize performance.

Learn more about the Enlist weed control system, Enlist herbicides and Liberty herbicide. Visit Enlist.com and BASF. Follow Enlist with @EnlistOnline on Twitter or go to the  YouTube channel for Enlist.

Help farmers use the powerful combination of Enlist herbicides and Liberty® herbicide to control tough weeds while curbing the development of resistant weeds.

Suggested Tweet: Enlist One® + Liberty® herbicides manhandles pigweed and waterhemp. That’s why Liberty herbicide is the recommended glufosinate for use on Enlist™ crops. #weedcontrol

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

Control weeds this spring with the power of three

Three Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • Controlling herbicide-resistant weeds is a top priority when planning for a new season.
  • A strong herbicide plan for soybean fields needs to include several modes of action, residual control and flexibility.
  • A good recommendation for your customers that fits all these criteria is Dupont Trivence® herbicide from Corteva Agriscience.

As you plan your customers’ soybean herbicide programs for spring 2020, controlling herbicide-resistant weeds is likely top of mind. While looking for the right products, it’s a good idea to consider herbicides that offer unique modes of action, flexible application and strong, residual control. Dupont Trivence® herbicide from Corteva Agriscience fits the bill on all three counts.

Three Modes of Action
Trivence offers three unique modes of action to control glyphosate-resistant weeds such as Palmer amaranth, lambsquarters and giant ragweed. These modes of action include seedling control by stunting seedling growth; residual control by binding to weed proteins to stop energy production in the plant; and contact control by burning plant tissues.

Residual control from Trivence lasts up to six weeks after application. A strong, residual herbicide is key to keeping germinating weeds under control.

Flexibility
Farmers across the Midwest struggled with a cool, wet spring in 2019. If we see those conditions again, Trivence will continue to be a go-to solution for weed control. The herbicide offers flexible application in spring, from preplant up to three days after planting. If bad weather creates setbacks, a flexible application time provides more opportunities for spraying.

Trivence herbicide also can be tank mixed with a variety of partners, such as glyphosate and 2,4-D, to offer even more modes of action.

Learn More
Now that you’ve had the overview about Trivence, it’s time to learn more. Visit Trivence.Corteva.US to find application rates and a map of where the herbicide is registered. Talk to your customers about Trivence this spring.

DuPontTrivence® herbicide protects soybeans with three modes of action.

Suggested Tweet: Control herbicide-resistant weeds with the power of three this spring. Learn how DuPontTrivence® herbicide can help defeat weeds in your soybean fields at Trivence.Corteva.US

™®Trademark of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. DuPont Trivence is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

You spoke, we listened

Three Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • We sent out a readership survey in August 2019; 291 readers responded.
  • 72% of the respondents said Inputs & Insights helped them make a business decision in 2019. 80% said they share content from Inputs & Insights with others, like customers or co-workers.
  • Respondents asked for more content, such as videos and charts. We’ve taken those suggestions and incorporated some changes.

2020 has officially arrived; this means a new year, a new decade and a new Inputs & Insights. We know the new year is a perfect time for a fresh start, and we’re excited to announce some positive changes to the newsletter you’ve come to rely on for key crop protection information. We’ve decided to make these changes based on the results of a recent readership survey. You asked for these changes, and we listened.

Readership Survey
In August 2019, we emailed a survey to readers of Inputs & Insights asking what you like about the newsletter and what you’d like to see changed. Here are some highlights:

  • 291 readers completed the survey.
  • 72% of respondents said Inputs & Insights has helped them make a business decision.
  • 21% of respondents were from Iowa, the top state represented in the survey.
  • Nearly 80% of respondents said they share the newsletter.
    • 43% of respondents said they discussed the newsletter with customers (a 5% increase over the last survey in 2017).
    • 32% of respondents said they discussed the newsletter with colleagues (a 10% increase over the last survey in 2017).

Changes We’ve Made

In the survey, respondents asked for the following changes:

  • Increase content, including articles, photos, videos and charts.
  • Make it easier to share content on social media.
  • Tighten up articles for faster reading.

We’ve listened and already have incorporated new content about fungicides and crop disease. We also added key takeaways at the top of articles to help streamline content, suggested a social media post at the bottom of most articles, and added more photos and other media to many articles.

We hope you enjoy the changes and look forward to bringing you the content you need to help your customers in 2020 and beyond.

™®Trademark of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2020 Corteva.

Being the person your customers can trust

Three Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • January is a good time to reevaluate your relationships with your customers. How can you be a good partner for growers heading into a new season?
  • Illinois farmer Allen Tompkins and his retailer Troy Leininger discuss how important it is for a farmer and retailer to have a trusted working relationship for a successful growing season.
  • Tompkins and Leininger say a retailer needs to be a person the farmer can trust and rely on.

A new year is upon us and farmers are already making plans for the upcoming growing season. It’s time to recommend the right products and the right programs to your customers to ensure a successful yield come fall. One integral piece of ensuring that success is the farmers’ trust in you and your recommendations.

We interviewed farmer Allen Tompkins and retailer Jeremy Leininger about the importance of trust in a working relationship at Tompkins’ farm in Smithboro, Illinois, last summer.

Leininger, who works for Woolsey Brothers Farm Supply in Vandalia, Illinois, put it simply when he said, “The farmer has to trust you, because if they don’t trust you, they might as well not do business with you.”

Now is a good time to reevaluate the relationships you have with your customers. By making sure they trust you, you’re setting them, and yourself, up for success in 2020 and beyond.

Watch the video of Tompkins and Leininger below or on the Corteva Agriscience YouTube channel. You can also learn about the best corn herbicides for your farmers who are planning ahead by visiting the Corn Herbicides Portfolio on Corteva.us.

Suggested TweetA retailer needs to be someone a farmer can trust. This video shows how a good relationship between farmer and retailer leads to success: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rojlc0hxywI.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

3 things to know about nitrogen hibernation

Those who apply nitrogen fertilizer in the fall generally understand that the nitrification process (a.k.a. the process that contributes to nitrogen loss), is chemically halted when the weather gets cold enough and then begins again as temperatures rise.

However, gaining a deeper knowledge of what happens to fall-applied nitrogen over the winter and into spring can make you better prepared to make the best nitrogen management recommendations for your customers year-round.

With that in mind, here are a few key takeaways to understand about fall-applied nitrogen as it hibernates over the winter:

  • 50 degrees F is a notable temperature benchmark
    • The nitrification process is put in motion by a bacteria called Nitrosomonas. It causes the conversion of nitrogen to a nitrate form that can be easily lost. Nitrosomonas bacteria is very active when it is warm, it decreases activity significantly at 50 degrees F and nearly halts under 40 degrees F.
    • For fall nitrogen application, temperatures can hover anywhere above, at, or below this Nitrosomonas activity threshold. Ideal application occurs at 50 degrees F and below to minimize the amount of potential nitrogen lost.
  • Moisture + warmth = more loss potential
    • Warm weather makes Nitrosomonas more active in converting nitrogen to a form vulnerable to loss, but moisture from rain or snowmelt occurring at the same time leads to a higher potential for that nitrogen to be lost via leaching.
  • Beware of the transitional weather danger zone
    • Fall-applied nitrogen must endure two transitional weather periods, which nitrogen is particularly vulnerable to loss given the points above.
    • We know that spring can be unstable and unpredictable, often with large shifts in temperatures and rain amounts.
    • Recent years also show us that fall can be equally unpredictable. Unexpected heavy rain, extended periods of warm weather and delayed harvest can impact when (and if) fall nitrogen can be applied and especially impact how vulnerable it is to loss — well before crops are ready to use it.

Fall-applied nitrogen is a fantastic way to prepare fields for the coming year and can help alleviate some of the workload in spring. But, science shows us that nitrogen is vulnerable to loss from the moment it is applied. To get the benefits of fall-applied nitrogen but ensure it’s there for your crops come spring, it’s best to protect it with a proven nitrogen stabilizer, like N‑Serve®.

N‑Serve protects nitrogen from leaching and denitrification, so it’s guarded during the warm and wet transitional weather periods. N‑Serve also extends nitrogen’s availability in the soil so that it’s there in the spring when your crops need it during critical growth periods.

To learn how N‑Serve with anhydrous ammonia can impact you and your customers’ bottom line, use our Profit Calculator.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

Weed of the Month: Waterhemp

waterhempThe battle against herbicide resistance continues as waterhemp persistently challenges growers and forces them to rethink their weed control programs. In the past 25 years, waterhemp has grown resistant to six classes of herbicides and threatens to resist various modes of action.

  • Common name: Tall waterhemp
  • Scientific name: Amaranthus tuberculatus1
  • Cotyldons: egg-shaped2
  • Leaf shape: long and narrow, smooth stems and leaves2
  • Reproduction: dioecious (separate male and female plants)2
  • Flowers: structure near top of plant and tips of branches2

Fast facts

  • History: Herbicide-resistant waterhemp was first discovered in 1993 in Iowa and it has spread across the Midwestern states within the past 20 years.3
  • Origin: Waterhemp is native to North America; however, waterhemp was not a weed found in crop fields like other pigweed species. Researchers believe waterhemp may have taken traits from a different Amaranthus species and moved from marshes to fields.1
  • Variations: There are two variations of waterhemp. One variation (Amaranthus tuberculatus var. rudis) is found west of the Mississippi River; the other variation (Amaranthus tuberculatus var. tuberculatus) is found east of the Mississippi.1
  • Fast-growing: Waterhemp grows quickly. A plant can grow 1-1¼ inches in one day.4
  • Many seeds: Waterhemp can produce about 250,000 seeds per plant and up to 1 million seeds without competition.4
  • Long-lasting seeds: Waterhemp seeds can germinate many years after they are produced. Some research shows that 12% of waterhemp seeds could germinate after four years.4

Control tips

  • Scout early — and often. Waterhemp looks very similar to Palmer amaranth early in its growth; however, there are differences. Look for longer, more lance-shaped leaves than pigweed species.5
  • Use multiple modes of action through various herbicide options. Layer residual herbicides to target different areas of the plant.5
  • Change row spacing. Narrower rows help crops get to canopy and overpower weeds before they grow too large to actively control.5
  • Use tillage, if appropriate. Waterhemp seeds cannot germinate unless they are in the top layer of soil. However, growers must be cautious of erosion.5
  • Utilize crop rotation. It can allow growers to change up herbicides and modes of action to help fight weed resistance.5

States with Herbicide-Resistant Waterhemp by Crop3

States with Waterhemp Resistant to Glyphosate3

Corteva Agriscience offers the following weed control solutions:

Corn Herbicides

DuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
FulTime® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
DuPont Realm® Q herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
SureStart® II herbicide

Soybean Herbicides
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
DuPont EverpreX® herbicide
FirstRate® herbicide
Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
DuPontAfforia® herbicide
DuPontEnlite® herbicide
DuPont™ FeXapan™ herbicide Plus VaporGrip® Technology
DuPont Trivence® herbicide


Sources:

1Iowa State University, Extension and Outreach. 2019. Waterhemp. a ‘friendly’ native evolves into the Cornbelt’s worst weed problem. https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/blog/bob-hartzler/waterhemp-friendly-native-evolves-cornbelts-worst-weed-problem
2University of Minnesota Extension. Annual broadleaf weeds. https://extension.umn.edu/weed-identification/annual-broadleaf-weeds#amaranth-family-id-waterhemp-palmer-amaranth-and-redroot-pigweed-838061
3International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds. Herbicide resistant tall waterhemp globally. http://weedscience.org/Summary/Species.aspx
4United Soybean Board. 2018. Waterhemp management in soybeans. https://iwilltakeaction.com/uploads/files/54403-01-ta-factsheet-waterhemp-update-lr_1.pdf
5AGDAILY. 2018. Corteva Agriscience: five tips for fighting off waterhemp. https://www.agdaily.com/crops/corteva-agriscience-five-tips-waterhemp/

™®Afforia, Cinch, DMA, DuPont, Durango, Elevore, Enlist, Enlist Duo, Enlist One, Enlite, EverpreX, FeXapan, FirstRate, FulTime, Keystone, Realm, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart, Surveil and Trivence are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. VaporGrip® is a registered trademark of and used under license from Monsanto Technology LLC. Cinch ATZ, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are Restricted Use Pesticides. FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology is a Restricted Use Pesticide. For retail sale to and use only by Certified Applicators and only for those uses covered by the Certified Applicator’s certification. Cinch ATZ, Durango DMA, Elevore, FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Realm Q, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. EverpreX is not registered in all states. See your Corteva Agriscience retailer or representative for availability in your state. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.