Author Archives: inputsandinsights

Control high-anxiety weeds through fall burndown treatments

Kent Bennis

Kent Bennis, market development specialist, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont

Fall often consists of reflection and planning for your customers. This entails evaluating their current season and preparing for the next. However, for many soybean farmers in the Midwest, fall is also the time they may be experiencing the pain of actively growing weeds, including marestail.

We highly recommend that your customers implement fall burndown treatments to help ease their weed anxieties. Specifically, postharvest burndown treatments can reduce customers’ worries by providing thorough weed control in recently harvested fields. And when farmers combine a fall burndown treatment with a spring residual herbicide, they will experience cleaner fields through planting.

Here are some key benefits of fall burndown treatments to share with your customers:

  • Lessens weed pressure so fields are ready to plant as soon as farmers are ready
  • Reduces the dead mat of weeds common after a spring burndown to speed soil warming and dryout, especially in no-till fields
  • Keeps soil moisture available for the young crop
  • Helps create a warmer, drier seedbed for uniform emergence and better seedling vigor
  • Decreases insect pressure by eliminating the conditions insect populations use to become established

When implementing a fall weed control program, it’s critical to find a herbicide solution that offers a thorough spectrum of control on postharvest weeds. A herbicide such as Elevore® uses a systemic approach that works to kill a broad range of weeds from the inside out, including actively growing marestail up to 8 inches tall and other ALS- and glyphosate-resistant species.

The results provide farmers with numerous benefits, including a more streamlined workload with fewer hours of spring work, better-prepared fields at planting and the opportunity for increased yield at harvest.

For more information, visit this resource, ElevateYourBurndown.com, to learn more about how you can help your customers fight back against high-anxiety weeds in soybean fields.

About the author: Kent Bennis is a market development specialist at Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont. Kent has worked at Dow AgroSciences for more than 23 years and is based in Delmar, Iowa.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Elevore is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Herbicide Lessons Lessen Farmers’ Concerns

Growing knowledge about the Enlist weed control system remains vital as Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, continues to prepare the market for the large-scale commercialization of Enlist E3 soybeans.

Corteva Agriscience will broadly license Enlist E3 soybeans following Chinese import approval of the Enlist E3 soybean trait. Making this trait widely available to farmers requires seamless collaboration with seed companies: The technology must be available in the best genetics over a wide range of maturities. That’s why the company is engaging now with seed companies that plan to add Enlist E3 soybeans to their product lineups.

Ensuring the Enlist technology is in elite soybean (as well as corn and cotton) genetics will help farmers, applicators and retailers who evaluate the Enlist trait be more profitable and successful. 

As this technology gets into the hands of more farmers – and the retailers they trust – it builds comfort with the system and prepares for continued expansion of Enlist crop acreage.

Part of this effort is continued access to education and tools that help users get more out of the Enlist system. Field planning, best management practices, application education and advice help farmers position Enlist crops to perform as promised. This includes on-target application, excellent weed control, exemplary crop tolerance and the opportunity for top yield.

Education from the start
From the beginning, education and product stewardship have been critical pillars of this technology. As a key part of the Enlist weed control system, the Enlist Ahead management resource provides an array of tools to help retailers, farmers, and applicators understand how to use this technology — including Enlist herbicides — appropriately and effectively.

As individual Enlist crops come to market, the emphasis on education, training and stewardship expands. Committing resources to these efforts allows the company to launch these crops in a careful, responsible and measured way.

“When we work with farmers, we emphasize field planning, a program approach and adherence to all label requirements, including downwind buffers,” says Andy Asbury, a field specialist for Illinois. “Farmers are seeing how this system works in their fields.”

Specialists such as Asbury provide tools and training to help ensure farmers can use this technology confidently.

“We can help farmers understand label requirements for our products,” says Steve Snyder, a field specialist who covers the upper Midwest. “In addition, we offer online resources so growers in the field can get quick access to information on their tablets or smartphones.”

Customers are gaining experience with Enlist crops. Enlist Ahead tools provide a wealth of information to help users feel secure when using this much-needed and extremely effective weed control technology. Learn more about the Enlist Ahead management resource by visiting Enlist.com

Enlist education efforts

Continuing education efforts highlight the growth of the Enlist weed control system. Collaboration with seed companies and in-the-field training are helping growers, applicators and retailers understand how to use this technology most effectively and successfully.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or respective owners. Enlist E3 soybeans were jointly developed by Dow AgroSciences and MS Technologies. Enlist soybeans are approved for cultivation in the U.S. and have also received import approval in a number of importing countries. Dow AgroSciences continues to pursue import approvals in additional countries, including in China, for Enlist E3 soybean products, in accordance with Excellence Through Stewardship® product launch guidance. ®Excellence Through Stewardship is a registered trademark of Excellence Through Stewardship. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Three steps to identify a proven nitrogen stabilizer

Nitrogen stabilizers are one option to protect nitrogen; however, the market is saturated with products that claim to protect nitrogen. With fall purchasing decisions around the corner, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, has identified key criteria to help farmers select a proven nitrogen stabilizer that is right for them.

Weeding through the myriad of stabilizer products can be tricky, and timely factors like commodity prices, trade negotiations and nutrient management regulations make finding the best option even more important. Corteva Agriscience recommends that farmers use three criteria in determining the right nitrogen stabilizer to use:

  1. Leverage University-supported research
    Use stabilizers that have been rigorously tested and proven by universities. Farmers should ask their retailers to share academic research that supports the claims that are being touted.
  2. Check labeling to ensure it meets EPA registration guidelines
    Use stabilizers that also follow EPA registration guidelines. These guidelines require robust documentation and research to support claims that relate to the effectiveness of a nitrogen stabilizer product.
  3. Prioritize value
    The current economics of farming may not be as rewarding as a few years ago, so every penny matters. Stabilizers can be viewed as an insurance policy to protect crop yield and preserve a farmer’s investments. Whether you’re concerned about nitrogen being a yield-limiting factor or concerned about nitrogen loss impacting water quality, nitrogen should always be protected.

Two options that meet this criteria set are Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers. Instinct and N-Serve maximize nitrogen by extending its availability for up to eight weeks, during critical growth stages for corn and wheat, helping crops deliver the maximum yield at harvest. To learn more, visit MaxInMaxOut.com, or contact your local Corteva Agriscience territory manager.

®™Trademark of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences

Key trends and learnings: Farm Progress Show 2018

On Aug. 28-30 in Boone, Iowa the newly formed Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, made its presence known at the 65th annual Farm Progress Show with two show-stopping exhibits, four eye-catching sponsorships and a Guinness World Record. The Corteva Agriscience crop protection brands focused on topics to help farmers address their most common in-field issues, nitrogen management plans and weed-specific questions.

Soybean Herbicides
Soybean herbicide representatives shared with attendees the importance of implementing a fall burndown treatment to start with clean fields in the spring. Attendees learned how Elevore® uses a systemic approach that works to kill a broad range of weeds from the inside out, including actively growing marestail up to 8 inches tall.

In addition, Chris Pritchett, U.S. product manager, soybean herbicides; Kent Bennis, U.S. market development specialist; Autumn Patishall, territory manager, northwest Iowa; and Andy Fordice, category lead, Enlist and Xtend herbicides, spoke on an expert panel, answering attendees’ questions about field conditions, tough weeds, inputs and industry trends.

An expert panel at the Corteva Agriscience<sup style=

An expert panel at the Corteva Agriscience booth answers in-field questions.

Nitrogen Maximizers
The nitrogen maximizers team shared tips on how to identify and select a proven nitrogen stabilizer. Team members discussed how it is important for farmers to choose nitrogen stabilizers, such as Instinct® and N-Serve®, that meet key criteria including university research, meeting guidelines from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and prioritizing value.

Kenny Johnson, CCA U.S. product manager, nitrogen stabilizers, at Corteva Agriscience™, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, DowAgroSciences, discusses key criteria for selecting a proven nitrogen stabilizer.

Kenny Johnson, CCA U.S. product manager, nitrogen stabilizers, at Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, DowAgroSciences, discusses key criteria for selecting a proven nitrogen stabilizer.

Enlist Weed Control System
Corteva Agriscience representatives for the Enlist weed control system talked with visitors about the continued importance of information and educational tools for farmers, applicators and retailers. Andy Fordice, category leader for the Enlist system, led an informational session during the show. Presentations like this support the classroom and field training technology specialists host throughout the year.

Andy Fordice, Enlist™ category leader, speaks with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue about the Enlist weed control system.

Andy Fordice, Enlist category leader, speaks with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue about the Enlist weed control system.

Andy Fordice, Enlist™ category leader, addresses a crowd at Farm Progress Show, discussing the Enlist weed control system.

Andy Fordice, Enlist category leader, addresses a crowd at Farm Progress Show, discussing the Enlist weed control system.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. ®XtendiMax is a registered trademark of Monsanto Technology LLC. XtendiMax is a federally Restricted Use Pesticide. Enlist Duo® and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weed of the Month: Palmer Amaranth

  • Palmer AmaranthCommon name: Palmer pigweed
  • Scientific name: Amaranthus palmeri 1
  • Grass or broadleaf: Annual broadleaf
  • Native to the Southwestern desert regions of the United States, Palmer amaranth has expanded rapidly across the Southeast and can be found in multiple Midwestern states.1
  • Germination timing: Palmer amaranth emergence is from early May until mid-September. This long emergence period forces farmers to manage the weed throughout the year, unlike other summer annual weeds that are typically managed only through early summer.1
  • Competitiveness: Known as the most competitive and aggressive pigweed species, Palmer amaranth can lead to soybean yield loss up to 79 percent and corn yield loss up to 91 percent in some states. It also can significantly increase production costs.2
  • Palmer amaranth grows fast – as much as 2 to 3 inches per day – and commonly reaches 6 to 8 feet.2
  • Farm equipment, specifically combines, and wildlife can spread Palmer amaranth seed into new, previously uninfected fields.1

Fast facts

  • Palmer amaranth has dioecious reproduction, meaning plants are either male or female, which forces outcrossing and genetic diversity.1 This makes it more difficult to control.
  • Each plant can produce 100,000 or more seeds when it competes with a crop. In noncompetitive scenarios, each plant can produce nearly a half million seeds.
  • According to WeedScience.org, the first confirmation of glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth in Midwest corn, cotton and soybean fields occurred in Missouri in 2008.
  • To identify Palmer amaranth, look for smooth green leaves arranged in an alternate pattern that grows symmetrically around the stem. The leaves are oval to diamond-shaped. There may be a small, sharp spine at the leaf tip.2
  • Palmer amaranth seeds are small and thrive in no-till or minimum-tillage fields.1

Weed management tips1

  • Rotate crops: this allows farmers to use herbicides with additional modes of action in the field.
  • Practice deep tillage: this will bury the small Palmer amaranth seed below its preferred emergence depth.
  • Plant a cereal rye cover crop: this crop can provide a mulch that will suppress Palmer amaranth emergence.
  • Harvest heavily infested fields last: because machinery so easily spreads Palmer amaranth seeds from one field to another, consider harvesting fields or parts of field with infestations last to limit seeds to that area.

Resistance Statistics*

  • According to WeedScience.org, herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth has been documented in corn and soybean fields in 24 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin.

*Resistance confirmation does not include all weeds and may vary among different areas of each state.

Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, offers the following weed control solutions:

Corn

DuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
FulTime® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
DuPont Realm® Q herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
SureStart® II herbicide

Soybean

Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
DuPont EverpreX® herbicide
FirstRate® herbicide
Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
DuPont Trivence® herbicide

Additional information:

For more information, read these weed science resources:

Sources:
1Purdue University Extension 2013. Palmer Amaranth Biology, Identification, and Management. https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/WS/WS-51-W.pdf
2Minnesota Department of Agriculture 2018. Palmer Amaranth in Minnesota. https://mda.state.mn.us/plants-insects/palmer-amaranth-minnesota

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (“DuPont”) or affiliated companies of Dow or DuPont. Cinch ATZ, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are federally Restricted Use Pesticides. Cinch ATZ, Durango DMA, Elevore, EverpreX, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Realm, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II, Surveil and Trivence are not registered for sale or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Poll of the Month

Education: From the start, a key pillar for Enlist™ weed control system

David Hillger

David Hillger,
Ph.D., herbicide trait field specialist

Retailers understand that successful herbicide application means not just controlling weeds but also taking care when applying near surrounding crops and gardens.

From the beginning, education has been one of the keys to launching the Enlist weed control system. We always realized the importance of committing resources to help users understand this technology and use it correctly. We’re continuing these efforts to reach retailers, applicators and, of course, farmers.

Farmers who’ve applied Enlist herbicides according to the label have controlled their toughest weed challenges and, thanks to Colex-D® technology, seen the value of lower potential for physical drift and near-zero volatility.

Three key pillars of Enlist technology
Stewardship education has been a strong foundation in the development of the Enlist technology. Three important pillars support the Enlist system:

  1. The Enlist trait, which allows farmers to apply Enlist herbicides postemergence on Enlist cotton, corn and soybeans.
  2. Enlist herbicides — Enlist Duo® and Enlist One herbicides — which control tough broadleaf weeds that increasingly challenge farmers. Both feature Colex-D technology to help herbicides stay where they’re sprayed when applied according to the label.
  3. The Enlist Ahead management resource, which is designed to help farmers succeed while promoting the responsible use of the Enlist system.

We developed Enlist Ahead with extensive input from farmers and other key stakeholders. This management resource has been a vital part of our Enlist system since 2012, well before Enlist crops and herbicides were in any farmer’s fields.

Enlist Ahead resources focus on the proactive management of weed resistance, minimizing potential for off-target movement of Enlist herbicides and promoting trait stewardship.

Enlist Ahead training combines in-field training experiences, classroom-style instructor-led sessions and online training. We support training with robust literature and reference materials on Enlist.com, as well as access to our team of in-field experts to help advise about field planning, sprayer setup and application planning.

When I’m visiting with farmers, one of the first things I like to do is understand where they plan to plant their Enlist crops. Together, we’ll look at what crops are in neighboring fields, weed pressure and types of weeds in the field. Then we can tailor a plan using Enlist Ahead resources, including the Enlist Ahead app.

Enlist representatives have worked with and trained tens of thousands of farmers, applicators and retailers at in-field demonstrations across the entire Corn Belt and Cotton Belt.

Retailers can take advantage of many online tools, including the Product Use Guide, sprayer cleanout guide, application guide and the Enlist Ahead detailer, which includes information on the Enlist Ahead app, incentives and other benefits.

Also check out our educational videos on our YouTube channel, visit Experiencing Enlist and follow us on Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

About the author: David Hillger, Ph.D., is herbicide traits field specialist who covers the eastern Corn Belt. He brings his weed science expertise to farmers and retailers who want to know more about Enlist technology, weed control and on-target application. 

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or respective owners. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Corteva Agriscience