Author Archives: inputsandinsights

Applying 2019 lessons to 2020 weed management plans

By: Jeff Ellis, Market Development Specialist, Missouri, Corteva Agriscience       

As harvest winds down across the Midwest, the challenges of the 2019 season remain. A delayed harvest in 2018 rolled into a rainy spring, which led to difficulties with weeds and nutrient management. Weather-related setbacks were relentless throughout the season, but these hardships have taught us important lessons to carry into 2020.

The most important of those lessons is that it is critical for you and your customers to plan for each season but also be ready to adjust as conditions change. Be prepared for the worst, hope for the best and always be on your toes.

Challenging Winter Weeds
The wet fall and spring weather created perfect conditions for large and aggressive winter weeds to show up in fields across the Midwest.

We saw a lot of troublesome weeds, such as henbit and marestail. These are winter annuals that germinate in fall and, because a lot of farmers were unable to spray herbicides in fall 2018, those weeds were given free rein during the winter and into the spring.

Start Now to Control Weeds in 2020
Given what we know about winter annual weeds, I recommend fall herbicide applications, if weather permits. This helps prevent weeds from taking over fields during the winter.

If left untreated, henbit, for example, can grow into a thick, mat-like ground covering. That covering creates a soil barrier and decreases the soil’s ability to properly dry. This also impedes soil-to-seed contact during spring planting.

Spring into Action
Regardless of whether you and your customers can complete a fall herbicide application, you’ll want to get a jump on your herbicide program in spring 2020. The sooner you can start controlling weeds, the better.

When it comes to a herbicide program for corn, I recommend starting with a preemergence herbicide at planting to eliminate early-season weed competition and maximize corn yields.

An effective program approach from Corteva Agriscience consists of applying SureStart® II herbicide or FulTime® herbicide preemergence, followed by Resicore® herbicide or DuPont Realm® Q herbicide postemergence. This provides multiple modes of action to control the toughest weeds, including herbicide-resistant species such as Palmer amaranth and waterhemp.

I also recommend this program because of the application flexibility. If the weather is uncooperative again in 2020, the wide application window of this program gives you more time to spray customers’ fields. Time is money, and this approach helps save both.

Visit our Corn Herbicides website to find labels of the herbicides mentioned in this article and to find other product recommendations to share with your customers.


About the author: Jeff Ellis is a Market Development Specialist for Corteva Agriscience, based outside of Kansas City, Missouri. Jeff worked as a field research scientist for Dow AgroSciences for 10 years. He has a doctorate in agronomy and crop science from Louisiana State University.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. FulTime is a Restricted Use Pesticide. FulTime is not available for sale, distribution or use in the state of New York. Realm Q, Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

5 steps to prepare for fall anhydrous ammonia applications

Anhydrous ammonia is the preferred source of nitrogen for fall applications because it rapidly absorbs into soil moisture and, typically, has a slower conversion to nitrate. However, anhydrous is a challenging product to work with given safety concerns and special equipment needs.

With a rushed harvest like this one, it may be easy to overlook proper preparedness steps, but skipping them can be detrimental and dangerous. For safe, efficient and successful anhydrous applications this fall, follow these preparedness steps:

  1. Wear proper PPE
    Anhydrous ammonia aggressively seeks out water – and that includes water in your skin, eyes and lungs. Wear personal protective equipment (PPE) including splash goggles, cover all exposed skin (in accordance with the Safety Data Sheet), and keep fresh water readily available should you come in contact with anhydrous.
  1. Ensure proper storage and maintenance for tanks and trailers
    Anhydrous ammonia must be compressed into a liquid for agricultural application. This compression requires a considerable amount of pressure and equipment such as special tanks and trailers. Ensure equipment is in good condition by checking for dents, thinning or paint issues. Fully empty the tanks and drop the pressure to zero when storing or making repairs.
  1. Check hoses, valves and gaskets
    Sunlight, kinking, cutting and abrasions shorten the normal service life for hoses. Look for those damages as well as soft spots and fully replace the hose if needed. All anhydrous ammonia valves should be removed from the tank every five years for inspection and service or replacement. Gaskets can swell over time but can be easily and inexpensively replaced when needed.
  1. Manage transportation
    Accidents from unsafe towing have devastating consequences. When transporting anhydrous ammonia, always follow your state’s specific regulations. It’s a good rule of thumb to travel at or below 25mph and add a slow-moving vehicle (SMV) emblem to your towing assembly to alert other drivers to your speed. And, always use a hitch pin with the safety keeper/retainer clip and two independent safety chains when towing.
  1. Careful application
    Inspect your equipment prior to each use and be sure to stand upwind when connecting, disconnecting, bleeding lines, or transferring product. Handle valves by the body – not by the wheel or latch. Close, bleed, disconnect, and secure valves and transfer lines when leaving equipment unattended. Finally, park equipment downwind from dwellings, people, and livestock.

In addition to preparing for the safe handling of anhydrous ammonia, it’s important to prepare it for maximum effectiveness too. Applying anhydrous with a nitrogen stabilizer, such as N‑Serve®, helps protect this valuable input from escaping before spring planting. N‑Serve can boost potential yield by keeping applied anhydrous in the root zone when crops need it most.

To learn more about anhydrous ammonia preparedness, N‑Serve and applying both products together, visit www.NitrogenMaximizers.com for more info. There you can also use the Profit Calculator to see how N‑Serve with anhydrous ammonia can impact your bottom line.

Safely apply anhydrous ammonia with these preparedness tips.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Farmer by farmer, Enlist™ Technology successes add up

When it comes to choosing products, performance, experience and talk with the neighbors are all influencing factors for farm decision-makers. And right now, farmers from North Dakota down to Mississippi, Nebraska to Virginia – and nearly everywhere in between – are talking to one another about the Enlist™ weed control system.

Indiana
In Indiana, farmer Adam Schwering says he’s happy to answer his neighbors’ questions about the cutting-edge technology.

“They’ll drive by our field and ask why our fields are so clean,” Schwering says. “We tell them it’s because of Enlist Duo®. They’re getting more curious about trying it.”

Iowa
And in Iowa, seed dealer Kyle Schultz lets his Enlist E3™ soybeans do the talking for him. Neighboring growers are watching closely to see what emerges in his fields.

“They’re all aware of where we planted the Enlist E3 soybeans,” explains Schultz. “They’re excited to see what they do and see how they yield at the end of the season. We put them along a road where other growers can see them.”

Mississippi
Farmers, like Mississippi’s Jeremy Jack, say they’re especially excited to show how effective the Enlist system is when used correctly. Jack plants both Enlist™ cotton and Enlist E3 soybeans. He uses Enlist One® herbicide in his weed control program to protect them. Jack says he follows the label exactly, and the herbicide stays put. He invites fellow farmers to see the proof in his fields.

“I want other producers to be able to walk out there, put their hands on the product, walk through the field, see how clean they are, see that the product is safe, the cotton looks good, and there’s no damage,” Jack says.

Nebraska
For Nebraska farmer Lynnet Talcott, the bottom line is clear: She hopes other growers give the Enlist system a chance.

“I would not hesitate to tell any farmers that they should try the Enlist system,” Talcott says. “I think it would be a great addition to their farming practices. It should be a simple choice for them. They should choose Enlist.”

With farmers spreading the word about the Enlist™ system, be ready for demand for Enlist herbicides in the 2020 season. Talk to your Corteva AgriScience territory manager about your order for Enlist One® and Enlist Duo® herbicides today.

Learn more about the Enlist system by visiting Enlist.com or by using Enlist Ahead resources.

A field of Enlist E3™ soybeans flourishes in Indiana.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist E3™ soybean technology is jointly developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC and MS Technologies LLC. Durango DMA, Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Corteva.

Bridging the farmer-consumer gap

As a global leader in agriculture, Corteva™ Agriscience believes strongly in the importance of open and honest dialogue between farmers and consumers. With the future of the industry in mind, the company is encouraging conversation about the origins of our food and bringing the voice of the farmer directly to consumers.

Whether you’re selling crop protection products, seed or digital ag services, how consumers perceive agriculture affects us all. The following programs are just a few examples of how Corteva is bridging the gap between those who produce and those who consume.

Spreading food facts
Although food is a basic human need, the concerns around it are far from simple. Enter Plate‑Wise. The Plate‑Wise blog tackles leading food topics — like processed foods, GMOs and perceptions around chemicals — to equip consumers with the information needed to make informed choices about food.

Tackling today’s most complex issues
With the recent spike in podcast popularity, Corteva is giving farmers a chance to tell their story and address some of today’s hot topics around agriculture. The Growing Debate podcast series dives into how agriculture is evolving to help solve new challenges, shedding light on the most complex industry in the world. Current and coming episode topics include the struggles of midsize farms, the role of migrant workers in ag and the higher-than-average suicide rate in farming.

Combining art and science
Your customers are modern-day superheroes as they battle weeds, crop diseases and pests with the help of innovative technology. To help boost knowledge of tech in modern farming, Corteva gathered insights from comic superfans at San Diego Comic Con 2019. They leveraged those insights to reimagine the real-life protectors of our food supply (farmers) by creating the ultimate Superhero Farming Family.

You can learn more about how Corteva is bridging the gap between consumers and farmers by visiting PeopleOfTheCore.com/Talk.

Pioneer agronomist Curt Hoffbeck talks crops with Minnesota Bound TV show host Laura Schara.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. ©2019 Corteva.

Control weeds in the fall to avoid headaches in the spring

When we’re young, we’re taught to not put off until tomorrow what we can do today. That adage applies to a lot of the work on a farm, including weed control. Once harvest ends, it’s a good idea to work with your customers on a fall herbicide application for their spring soybean fields to make everyone’s life a little easier for next year’s growing season.

Tough weeds like marestail, chickweed and dandelions actively grow and germinate throughout the fall. If left to overwinter in soybean fields, they can become even tougher in the spring. By taking action against those weeds now, while they’re still small, your customers can eliminate the need for, or increase the effectiveness of, a spring burndown application.

You’ll want customers to keep a few key points in mind when performing fall herbicide applications:

    • Do not apply to frozen ground.
    • Apply when air temperatures are still relatively warm, about 40 F to 60 F.
    • Apply to weeds that are actively growing.
    • Perform tillage beforehand on particularly weedy fields (if your customers use tillage, of course).

A good fall solution from Corteva Agriscience is Sonic® herbicide. Although Sonic is widely used as a spring preemergence herbicide, it’s very beneficial for fall weed control.

While your customers’ combines have been put away, that doesn’t mean the season is over. By taking out weeds now, their soybeans will have less competition for resources in spring and summer. Doing that work today paves the way for greater yield tomorrow.

To learn more about how Sonic can keep your customers’ soybean fields clean, contact your Corteva Agriscience territory manager or visit corteva.us.

A fall herbicide application of Sonic® herbicide can pave the way for a smoother spring.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Sharpen your location skills to help farmers plan herbicide trait placement

Real estate professionals say the keys to success are location, location, location. This can apply to herbicide trait technologies as well. Knowing what crops and plants are nearby can make a world of difference to farmers. Retailers can help their customers place herbicide-trait technologies where they’ll have the most opportunity to deliver maximum returns.

“Farmers need to consider field placement,” says Dan Puck, Enlist field specialist. “They should pick locations that allow them to get the maximum benefits from the herbicide traits in the varieties they plant. In most cases, this involves planting these traits in fields where they can use herbicides that provide the best control of problem weeds.”

Puck suggests placing Enlist E3 soybeans in fields that have resistant or tough-to-control weeds. The ability to apply Enlist One® and Enlist Duo® herbicides on top of these varieties will help handle these difficult weeds.

“Using the Enlist trait in areas near compatible crops helps ensure a farmer is able to use the best herbicide for the job,” Puck says. “Crops such as non-Enlist soybeans, corn, wheat, alfalfa and peanuts are compatible with Enlist herbicides.”

Compatible crops are those that are not listed as susceptible crops on Enlist herbicide labels. Puck emphasizes there are no wind direction restrictions when spraying near these compatible crops.

“No field separation is required,” he says. “You can apply right up next to any of these crops.”

Retailers can help farmers set up their weed control programs.

“Retailers and their customers should discuss each field to come up with weed control solutions,” Puck says. “The first step is to identify the weeds that are causing problems. Then pick a trait package that allows the use of herbicides effective against those weeds. Finally, take a holistic approach to put together a program that controls those weeds from preplanting through harvest.”

Using multiple herbicide modes of action is the best tactic for immediate control of weeds as well as limiting the development of higher populations of resistant and hard-to-control weeds. Take a prescriptive approach to weed control based on weed spectrum and pressure.

Discuss your customers’ needs and help them find the solutions that offer the best opportunity for weed control success.

To learn more about the Enlist weed control system, visit Enlist.com or use the Enlist Ahead resource. Also check out the YouTube channel or Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

Farmers will gain if retailers help them plan where to place herbicide-trait technologies to get the maximum benefits.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Corteva.

Weed of the Month: Velvetleaf

Originally from Asia and used as a fiber crop, velvetleaf was found in the United States around 1700. Today, velvetleaf can be found in fields as a weed and controlled by a variety of methods.

  • Common name: Velvetleaf
  • Scientific name: Abutilon theophrasti Medicus1
  • Annual or perennial: Summer annual1
  • Root system: Fibrous and taproot system2
  • Leaf arrangement: Alternate2
  • Leaf shape: Heart-shaped3
  • Flowers: Yellow with five petals3

Fast facts

  • Extreme heights: If left untouched, a velvetleaf plant can grow up to 7 feet tall.2
  • Seeds: Velvetleaf produces approximately 2,000 to 9,000 seeds per plant in capsules that contain 35 to 45 seeds.1
  • Competitiveness: If velvetleaf is left untouched, it can reduce corn yield by 20% to 34% if there are three plants per square foot.1
  • Soil Types: Velvetleaf thrives in compacted soils rich with nitrogen and with a high pH.1
  • Emergence: Velvetleaf emergences from the top 2 inches of soil. It will not survive germination if it remains on the soil surface.1

Identify differences between seedling velvetleaf, seedling prickly sida and seedling spurred anoda

  • Velvetleaf has one heart-shaped cotyledon and one round cotyledon; prickly sida has two heart-shaped cotyledons.2
  • Velvetleaf cotyledons are thicker than pricky sida cotyledons.2
  • Velvetleaf and spurred anoda both have similarly shaped cotyledons; but as the plant grows, spurred anoda’s first leaves are more triangular.2

Control tips

  • Flaming is an effective method for controlling velvetleaf.1
  • Hoeing can control velvetleaf if the plant is less than ¼ inch tall.1
  • A no-till situation can help control velvetleaf because the seed cannot survive on the surface.1
  • There are also herbicide options for velvetleaf control.1

Where Herbicide-resistant Velvetleaf Lives (according to WeedScience.org)

Corteva Agriscience offers the following weed control solutions:

Corn Herbicides

DuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
FulTime® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
DuPont Realm® Q herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
SureStart® II herbicide

Soybean Herbicides
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
DuPont EverpreX® herbicide
FirstRate® herbicide
Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
DuPont Trivence® herbicide
DuPontEnlite® herbicide
DuPontAfforia® herbicide
DuPont™ FeXapan™ herbicide Plus VaporGrip® Technology


Sources:

1Michigan State University, Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences. Velvetleaf. https://www.canr.msu.edu/weeds/extension/velvetleaf
2Steckel, L. Velvetleaf. https://extension.tennessee.edu/publications/Documents/W167.pdf
3University of Massachusetts Extension. Abutilon theophrasti. https://extension.umass.edu/landscape/weeds/abutilon-theophrasti

™®Afforia, Cinch, DMA, DuPont, Durango, Elevore, Enlist, Enlist Duo, Enlist One, Enlite, EverpreX, FeXapan, FirstRate, FulTime, Keystone, Realm, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart, Surveil and Trivence are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. VaporGrip® is a registered trademark of the Bayer Group. Cinch ATZ, FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are Restricted Use Pesticides. Cinch ATZ, Durango DMA, Elevore, FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Realm Q, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. EverpreX is not registered in all states. See your Corteva Agriscience retailer or representative for availability in your state. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.