Author Archives: inputsandinsights

Enlist Duo® herbicide as a burndown inspires trust, confidence

Scott Wright

Scott Wright
Enlist field specialist
Dow AgroSciences

As with any new product, some farmers are asking questions about how Enlist Duo® herbicide works and how to use it. Several farmers in 2017 got their first experience with this technology by using it as a burndown. They found Enlist Duo was effective and gained confidence in the herbicide.

John Lindamood of Tennessee was one farmer who was interested in the system, so he purchased Enlist Duo herbicide for use in burndown. He was able to control tough weeds while they were still small. In particular, annual bluegrass was “thick as a blanket.”

Enlist Duo did a fantastic job controlling weeds in Lindamood’s field, including the pesky annual bluegrass. Now, he is very comfortable with the performance and handling of Enlist Duo, and he plans to use it postemergence on Enlist™ crops.

Farmers in other areas had similar experiences. Tyler Tietjen was among several southeastern Nebraska farmers who applied Enlist Duo as a burndown this spring. It was everything he expected.

“I want clean fields when I start,” Tietjen says. “I expect the field to be 100 percent clean. Enlist Duo got everything. The field was clean after burndown.” Tietjen says the technology works as well as he had hoped.

Enlist Duo herbicide contains two modes of action: new 2,4-D choline and glyphosate. In addition to burndown applications, it is federally registered for postemergence use on Enlist corn, Enlist soybeans and Enlist cotton in 34 states.

Many farmers have been hearing good things about the Enlist weed control system, and they gain confidence once they experience it. Seeing really is believing.

®™DOW Diamond, Enlist and Enlist Duo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Help your customers pick a product that works

The variables affecting farmers’ ability to maximize each acre are constantly evolving. Nitrogen availability is one factor directly linked to being profitable and environmentally sustainable. To achieve optimum field effectiveness, farmers need to know the products they select will deliver the greatest success.

How do nitrogen maximizers increase the effectiveness of fertilizer?
Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers maximize nitrogen so crops can deliver the max in return. On average, they provide a revenue increase of $21 per acre.* By incorporating these products into a nitrogen management program, Instinct and N-Serve extend the uptake period so a crop can reach its maximum yield potential.

How do Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers help sustain the environment?
Studies show the active ingredient in both Instinct and N-Serve nitrogen stabilizers increase soil nitrogen retention by 28 percent, decreases nitrogen leaching by almost 16 percent and reduces greenhouse gases by 51 percent.**

Instinct is a recipient of the EPA Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award, which recognizes the environmental and economic benefits of developing and using novel green chemistry. In 2014, the chemistry composing Instinct helped increase U.S. corn production by 50 million bushels — which equates to more than $205 million in additional production revenue for U.S. farmers — while reducing carbon dioxide emissions by about 664,000 metric tons.

Can crops retain nitrogen longer?
Instinct and N-Serve help protect one of farmers’ largest input investments: nitrogen. The two products are proven to maximize profit potential by extending nitrogen availability during critical growth stages. They work below the soil’s surface, keeping nitrogen available up to eight weeks longer for maximum crop growth and profit potential.

How can nitrate leaching be reduced?
To inhibit nitrate leaching, farmers should follow the 4Rs Nutrient Stewardship program — apply nitrogen from the right fertilizer source, at the right rate, at the right time, with the right placement.

When nitrogen converts to nitrate, it is more susceptible to leaching out of the plant root zone and is no longer able to provide nutrients to the crop. Instinct and N-Serve nitrogen stabilizers help keep nitrogen in the root zone for a longer period which reduces nitrogen loss through leaching and denitrification.

For more information, visit NitrogenMaximizers.com or contact your Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

*Based on 452 Dow AgroSciences field trials from 2010-16, resulting in an average increase of 6.1 bu./A at $3.50/bu.
**Wolt, J.D. 2004. A meta-evaluation of nitrapyrin agronomic and environmental effectiveness with emphasis on corn production in the midwestern USA. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst. 69:23–41. doi:10.1023/B:FRES.0000025287.52565.99.

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Illinois farmer uses Resicore® herbicide to control weeds in hilly fields

Ian MacDonald of Hamlet, Illinois, grows corn and soybeans, and raises hogs with his father and uncle south of the Quad Cities in Illinois. When it comes to planting corn and spraying herbicides, some of the farmland is flat and easy to spray, but some of the acres feature hilly, rough ground that makes it difficult to spray a second pass without damaging corn.

“On the hillier ground, with the second pass, you end up running over a lot of corn,” MacDonald says. “So this year, we tried a full rate of 2.5 quarts per acre of Resicore, hoping we wouldn’t have to come back with a second pass if the weed control held. That way, we wouldn’t be running over as much corn and would have a better stand at harvest. We’re seeing that. We’re picking those two cornfields where we applied the full rate and the weed control has been very good so far.”

Right after planting this spring, MacDonald sprayed Resicore® herbicide with glyphosate and atrazine, and kept a close eye on his fields to make sure they stayed clean until canopy.

“From a pride perspective, it’s real nice to look out over a field and not see weeds poking up out of the canopy,” MacDonald says. “Otherwise, it’s about yield potential. If you’ve got a lot of weeds out there shading out the crop and taking those nutrients away from the corn, you’re limiting your yield potential. That residual is very important until the corn reaches full canopy so your crop is shading out the weeds, not vice versa.”

Waterhemp, giant ragweed and winter annual weeds are some of the worst offenders in MacDonald’s cornfields. During the mild winter preceding the spring of 2017, winter annual weeds, such as henbit and chickweed, never went dormant and were growing tall at planting.

“I was impressed with the knockdown ability of Resicore,” MacDonald says. “We used a low rate of glyphosate and atrazine with it. Some of those winter annuals were knee-high and it took them right out.”

As harvest winds down, MacDonald and his family are already planning for next season, which includes using Resicore again to control weeds deep into the season.

For more information about Resicore, visit PowerOverWeeds.com or contact your Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Resicore is not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

The science behind nitrogen maximizers

Nitrogen is one of the most significant input investments for farmers. That’s why it is critical that farmers do all they can to protect that investment when applying it to the soil. After application, various forms of nitrogen — including anhydrous ammonia, urea, UAN and liquid manure — become vulnerable to loss, primarily through leaching or denitrification.

To reduce the loss of your customers’ valuable nitrogen, it is important to keep it where it belongs — at the root zone where your crop needs it most. Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers work underground, where up to 70 percent of nitrogen loss can occur through leaching into the ground or denitrification into the atmosphere. They deliver maximum profit potential by extending nitrogen availability during the crop’s key growth stages.

The Science Is Simple
One of the most critical nutrients that farmers apply throughout the year is nitrogen. Nitrosomonas is a bacteria that breaks down ammonium forms of nitrogen, changing it from ammonium to nitrate. Unlike the ammomium form that’s stable in the soil, the nitrate form is highly susceptible to loss. Slowing down the conversion of ammonium to nitrates extends nitrogen availability in the soil for maximum crop growth potential. Instinct and N-Serve work to inhibit the nitrogen cycle by impeding Nitrosomonas bacteria activity for up to eight weeks, thereby slowing the transformation of ammonium to nitrate. This is most crucial during the often-rainy spring season, when rainwater can push nitrogen down into the soil as far as eight inches in a single rainfall in light-textured soils.

The Bottom Line
Maintaining nitrogen as ammonium minimizes leaching and the risk of groundwater contamination while maximizing available nitrogen in agroecosystems. Instinct and N-Serve not only help maximize nutrient availability, uptake and growth, ultimately increasing yield and profit potential, but also can have a positive impact on the environment.

*Camberato, J., and R. L. Nielsen. 2017. Soil Sampling to Assess Current Soil N Availability. https://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/corn/news/articles.08/floodingnitrogen-0613.html

Nitrogen applied with N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizer (left) compared with nitrogen applied without N-Serve (right).

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Answers to retailers’ top soybean questions

The most popular soybean topics on Operation: Clean Fields this year have been about planning a program approach, controlling marestail, waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, and how to fight back against herbicide-resistant weeds. Dow AgroSciences field experts are answering retailers’ top questions.

Operation: Clean Fields is a retailer-exclusive website designed to help retailers learn more about soybean topics that matter to them and their customers. Throughout the year, retailers have sent in their own questions about soybean herbicides and Dow AgroSciences field experts have answered several online. Many of the retailers who have sent in questions have not only received an answer, but also a $250 gift card if their question was selected to be answered in an article or video.

Jeff, Illinois retailer, recently asked “What would be the best approach right now, with the tools we currently have on the market, to control resistant waterhemp and marestail in soybeans?”. Dow AgroSciences market development specialist Jeff Moon provided an answer:

A layered approach with residual herbicides will provide the best chance for success. Here are three tips to manage resistant waterhemp and marestail:

  1. Start with a clean seedbed. For marestail specifically, apply a burndown herbicide to control it early.
  2. In spring, apply a residual herbicide, such as Sonic® herbicide, for an additional layer of early season control.
  3. Scout fields to determine postemergence approach.

Read more Q&A’s, watch videos from Dow AgroSciences experts and send in your questions for a chance to receive a $250 gift card by visiting OperationCleanFields.com.

soybeans

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Farm Progress Show activities help farmers adopt winning solutions

Dow AgroSciences continues to help farmers turn challenges into opportunities through new technology and agronomic solutions. The newest example — announced during August’s Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Illinois — is Elevore herbicide, which elevates a grower’s burndown program. Elevore contains a new active ingredient, Arylex, to help control labeled broadleaf weeds, including ALS- and glyphosate-resistant species. It offers superior control of marestail up to 8 inches tall.

Elevore is only one of the many solutions visitors learned about at Farm Progress Show. Dow AgroSciences shared its latest innovations, often engaging attendees with entertaining visual attractions that helped drive the messages home.

The Dow AgroSciences floor space at the show featured several educational games and interactive learning opportunities. After interacting with the games, attendees could choose to take home a small prize or write the name of their local FFA chapter for a $5 donation powered by Resicore® herbicide.

Thanks to nearly 1,000 booth visitors who chose to donate, Dow AgroSciences is donating $5,000 to the National FFA Organization on behalf of Resicore.

“Many FFA students and supporters visited our booth, and it was uplifting to see the bright future of agriculture,” says Lyndsie Kaehler, U.S. corn herbicides product manager, Dow AgroSciences. “Resicore gives farmers the power to control weeds on their farm, and we hope this donation gives students the power to do more in their FFA chapters.”

Hearing experts discuss key topics
Another highlight of the Dow AgroSciences booth was a series of informative speakers who addressed key agricultural topics. Subjects covered ways to manage nitrogen, managing weed resistance in corn, discussions about Bt trait technology and effective weed control solutions.

Last year, excessive rainfall swept through the Midwest, leaving puddles in cornfields and soil vulnerable to significant nitrogen loss. Jean Payne, president of the Illinois Chemical and Fertilizer Association, and Jennifer Tirey and Ted Funk from the Illinois Pork Producers Association, shared ways to manage nitrogen yet this fall.

“After harvest, our beautiful Illinois prairie soils start making nitrogen,” Payne says. “We’ve done a lot of education with farmers and we have to take into account that soil provides nitrogen, too. We cannot stabilize what Mother Nature produces, so anything we add to it beyond that in the fall, it’s really our responsibility to protect it.”

Farmers can use Instinct® or N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers to prevent nitrate leaching and keep more nitrogen available in the root zone next spring.

In addition, farmer Ben Hortenstine affirmed the value the Enlist weed control system is providing on his Ramsey, Illinois, farm. Farmers will have the opportunity in 2018 to use Enlist Duo® herbicide on Enlist corn available through Dow AgroSciences seed brands. Meanwhile, Chris Byus, Enlist herbicides product manager for Dow AgroSciences, provided an update on Enlist soybeans.

“Farmers stopping by could play an educational game or two and interact with our team,” Byus says. “We were able to be in front of people with visual demonstrations that will help them remember what they’ve heard. They saw the effective weed control and on-target application of the Enlist weed control system.”

The progress farmers saw at the Farm Progress Show translates into a better future for retailers offering these technologies and, of course, for the farmers purchasing them. Dow AgroSciences is bringing solutions for the real world — solutions that help improve yield and profit potential.

Dow AgroSciences booth at Farm Progress Show 2017.

The Dow AgroSciences booth featured educational and interactive games for attendees.

Farm Progress Show 2017 speaker at Dow AgroSciences booth.

Attendees heard from several agricultural experts during the show. Pictured here is Mark Bernards of Western Illinois University talking about how to manage herbicide-resistant weeds.

®™DOW Diamond, Arylex, Elevore, Enlist, Enlist Duo, Instinct, N-Serve, Resicore and Sonic are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. Enlist Duo herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Elevore, Instinct, Resicore and Sonic are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Arylex is a registered active. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weed of the month: Palmer amaranth

  • Palmer amaranthCommon name: Palmer pigweed
  • Scientific name: Amaranthus palmeri
  • Grass or broadleaf: Annual broadleaf
  • Commonly observed late spring through fall months and continues to emerge throughout the growing season — growing up to 3 inches per day in ideal conditions.
  • Known as the most competitive and aggressive pigweed species, Palmer amaranth can lead to corn yield loss up to 91 percent when allowed to compete with the crop throughout the growing season.1
  • Not only a threat to corn, season-long competition by Palmer amaranth at 2.5 plants per foot of row can reduce soybean yield by as much as 79 percent.1
  • Native to the Southwestern desert regions of the United States, devastation from Palmer amaranth has expanded across the Southeast and, recently, to the upper Midwest.
  • This invasive species has become one of the most significant weeds impacting cotton, corn and soybean production.

Fast facts from Jeff Ellis, Ph.D., field scientist, Dow AgroSciences

  • Palmer amaranth can adapt and quickly produce resistance genes to single-mode-of-action herbicides because individual plants are either male or female. This forces outcrossing and genetic diversity.
  • A single female plant can produce 600,000 seeds, which are rapidly spread through grain, seed, feed or equipment contamination.
  • Identifiable by its unique leaf shape, which is wide and ovate- to diamond-shape; Palmer amaranth leaves are commonly 2 to 8 inches long and a half-inch to 2½ inches wide.
  • Sometimes, the plants may show a white V-shaped watermark on the leaves. This watermark rules out other members of the pigweed family.

A fact that may surprise you …

  • Just how did an invasive desert plant make its way to the Midwest? Researchers believe Palmer amaranth was introduced to northern Indiana through manure from cattle that consumed seed-contaminated feed stocks from the South, such as cottonseed hulls. Farm equipment and wildlife also contribute to the spread of Palmer amaranth seed.

Resistance statistics*

  • According to WeedScience.org, herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth has been documented in corn and soybean fields in 24 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin.

*Resistance confirmation does not necessarily include all weeds in a population are resistant. Levels of resistance may vary in different areas of each state.

Tips for controlling and managing Palmer amaranth:

  • The key to mitigating Palmer amaranth is making control a priority before the weed emerges and addressing it when the plant is small. Given the threat Palmer amaranth poses to yield, growers should implement a season-long management plan, using residual herbicides with multiple modes of action to prevent Palmer amaranth seeds from spreading.
  • Tank-mix residual herbicides with postemergence herbicides to help avoid emergence issues later in the season. Layering residual products is important to control this weed, which germinates throughout the growing season.
  • Soybean farmers, especially, should always use residual herbicides to help control Palmer amaranth after crop emergence because there are few effective postemergence herbicide control options.

Tips for managing herbicide-resistant weeds:

Farmers in the Midwest and Midsouth are no strangers to some of the toughest weed species, such as: Palmer amaranth, waterhemp, ragweed and marestail. Implement these management best practices to help manage weed resistance issues during the season.

  • Develop an integrated weed management plan that delivers multiple modes of action throughout the season. The Enlist weed control system allows use of effective postemergence modes of action, including new 2,4-D choline, glyphosate and glufosinate in soybeans and new 2,4-D choline and glyphosate in corn.
  • Use full rates of the herbicides during applications. Do not use partial rates for any reason, including cost.
  • Spray when weeds are small. Although application can be challenging because of weather and other factors, timing is critical to achieve the best control.
  • Scout fields regularly to identify weeds when they are small and easy to control.

Dow AgroSciences weed control solutions:

Corn
SureStart® II herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide 

FulTime® NXT herbicide
Surpass® NXT herbicide 
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system

Soybean
Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Duramax® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system

Additional information:

Find more information using these weed science resources:
Palmer Amaranth In Minnesota — Minnesota Department of Agriculture
Palmer Amaranth Biology, Identification and Management — Purdue University Extension
Guidelines for the Identification and Management of Palmer Amaranth in Illinois Agronomic Crops — University of Illinois Department of Crop Science
Palmer Amaranth Identified in Nine Iowa Counties — Iowa State University Extension and Outreach/Integrated Crop Management

Sources:

1 Minnesota Department of Agriculture. 2017. Palmer Amaranth In Minnesota.
https://www.mda.state.mn.us/plants/pestmanagement/weedcontrol/noxiouslist/palmeramaranth/palmeramaranthfs.aspx

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are federally Restricted Use Pesticides. Duramax, Durango DMA, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II, Surpass NXT and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore, SureStart II and Surpass NXT are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC