Category Archives: Industry News

The science behind nitrogen maximizers

Nitrogen is one of the most significant input investments for farmers. That’s why it is critical that farmers do all they can to protect that investment when applying it to the soil. After application, various forms of nitrogen — including anhydrous ammonia, urea, UAN and liquid manure — become vulnerable to loss, primarily through leaching or denitrification.

To reduce the loss of your customers’ valuable nitrogen, it is important to keep it where it belongs — at the root zone where your crop needs it most. Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers work underground, where up to 70 percent of nitrogen loss can occur through leaching into the ground or denitrification into the atmosphere. They deliver maximum profit potential by extending nitrogen availability during the crop’s key growth stages.

The Science Is Simple
One of the most critical nutrients that farmers apply throughout the year is nitrogen. Nitrosomonas is a bacteria that breaks down ammonium forms of nitrogen, changing it from ammonium to nitrate. Unlike the ammomium form that’s stable in the soil, the nitrate form is highly susceptible to loss. Slowing down the conversion of ammonium to nitrates extends nitrogen availability in the soil for maximum crop growth potential. Instinct and N-Serve work to inhibit the nitrogen cycle by impeding Nitrosomonas bacteria activity for up to eight weeks, thereby slowing the transformation of ammonium to nitrate. This is most crucial during the often-rainy spring season, when rainwater can push nitrogen down into the soil as far as eight inches in a single rainfall in light-textured soils.

The Bottom Line
Maintaining nitrogen as ammonium minimizes leaching and the risk of groundwater contamination while maximizing available nitrogen in agroecosystems. Instinct and N-Serve not only help maximize nutrient availability, uptake and growth, ultimately increasing yield and profit potential, but also can have a positive impact on the environment.

*Camberato, J., and R. L. Nielsen. 2017. Soil Sampling to Assess Current Soil N Availability. https://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/corn/news/articles.08/floodingnitrogen-0613.html

Nitrogen applied with N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizer (left) compared with nitrogen applied without N-Serve (right).

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Answers to retailers’ top soybean questions

The most popular soybean topics on Operation: Clean Fields this year have been about planning a program approach, controlling marestail, waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, and how to fight back against herbicide-resistant weeds. Dow AgroSciences field experts are answering retailers’ top questions.

Operation: Clean Fields is a retailer-exclusive website designed to help retailers learn more about soybean topics that matter to them and their customers. Throughout the year, retailers have sent in their own questions about soybean herbicides and Dow AgroSciences field experts have answered several online. Many of the retailers who have sent in questions have not only received an answer, but also a $250 gift card if their question was selected to be answered in an article or video.

Jeff, Illinois retailer, recently asked “What would be the best approach right now, with the tools we currently have on the market, to control resistant waterhemp and marestail in soybeans?”. Dow AgroSciences market development specialist Jeff Moon provided an answer:

A layered approach with residual herbicides will provide the best chance for success. Here are three tips to manage resistant waterhemp and marestail:

  1. Start with a clean seedbed. For marestail specifically, apply a burndown herbicide to control it early.
  2. In spring, apply a residual herbicide, such as Sonic® herbicide, for an additional layer of early season control.
  3. Scout fields to determine postemergence approach.

Read more Q&A’s, watch videos from Dow AgroSciences experts and send in your questions for a chance to receive a $250 gift card by visiting OperationCleanFields.com.

soybeans

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Ongoing evaluation key to controlling weeds, improving yield in soybeans

As the sun bears down on record U.S. soybean acres, farmers keep their eyes on their fields to evaluate weed control decisions made earlier in the year. Ongoing scouting and peer discussions near harvest can help your customers fight back against persistent weeds the following season.

Every field potentially has unique weed management challenges depending on weather, soil type and weed control methods, which is why it’s hard to make decisions solely based on other farmers’ experiences. In addition to conversations with farmers, Dow AgroSciences field scientist Dave Ruen recommends consulting with trusted retailers, herbicide and seed suppliers, and Extension weed scientists for additional support.

“At this point in the season, farmers can see weed control performance firsthand in their own fields and ask specific questions to improve their programs for the following season,” Ruen says. “Herbicide-resistant weeds, particularly Palmer amaranth and waterhemp, are top of mind for many Midwest farmers this year.”

Ranked as two of the most troublesome and most common weeds of 2017 by the Weed Science Society of America, waterhemp and Palmer amaranth can cause devastating yield loss if left uncontrolled.

A preemergence first strike against waterhemp and Palmer amaranth can give soybeans the early season boost needed to improve yield potential. The best strategy to control these weeds includes a program approach using preemergence and postemergence herbicides with multiple modes of action.

Sonic® herbicide can be applied in the fall, preplant incorporated, preplant or preemergence up to three days after planting, before soybeans emerge. With two nonglyphosate modes of action, Sonic controls many broadleaf weeds resistant to glyphosate, including waterhemp, Palmer amaranth, giant ragweed and common ragweed.

Another way your customers can battle herbicide-resistant weeds is to stay current on newly identified resistance in their geography and keep detailed notes of specific weed pressure in their fields. Electronic files are easy to customize for individual fields based on crops and known weeds. Plus, they can be used as visual aids to build an inventory or cropping mix, and program solutions for the 2018 season.

Read more about waterhemp, Palmer amaranth and controlling other high-anxiety weeds from Dow AgroSciences field experts at OperationCleanFields.com.

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Withered weeds give farmers using Enlist Duo® herbicide reason to celebrate

Farmers have been facing increasingly intense weed pressure. It’s a rewarding sight when they find row after row of brown, shriveled weeds after an effective herbicide application. Controlling weeds allows the crop to thrive while limiting the seedbank that will produce weeds in future years.

That’s what farmers are seeing this summer after applying Enlist Duo® herbicide to their Enlist crops. They’re reporting extremely good weed control of even their toughest weed species.

“It was good to go into the field the next day and see weeds starting to curl up,” says Darin Anderson of North Dakota, who is growing Enlist soybeans this year under the Dow AgroSciences Field Forward program. “You know it’s working. You don’t see that with all herbicides.”

Cotton growers are seeing the same thing. This is the first year they’ve made postemergence applications of Enlist Duo — a novel combination of 2,4-D choline and glyphosate.

“We want a clean field,” says Austin Warbington, a cotton farmer from Georgia. “You could say we have a zero-tolerance policy for any type of weed. If we see it, we go get it.”

This year, Warbington saw wilted weeds soon after application. “A week after applying 2,4-D choline to the weeds we saw excellent control,” he says. “The weeds were brown and crispy.”

Other growers are seeing the same quick-acting effects and finally gaining the upper hand on their toughest weed challenges. You can help them achieve cleaner and more productive fields by educating them about the benefits of the Enlist weed control system.

Visit Experiencing Enlist to learn how other farmers are seeing similar results. Also check out our YouTube channel or follow us on Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

Farmers appreciate seeing weeds that shrivel and are controlled after an application of Enlist Duo® herbicide.

®™DOW Diamond, Enlist, Enlist Duo, the Enlist Logo, Enlist One and Field Forward are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Poll results: See how retailers are answering 2017 poll questions

Rain at planting, spraying delays and replanting: The first half of 2017 has been a lesson in perseverance. In the last three Inputs & Insights issues, readers have shared their opinions on a broad range of crop protection topics, including selling herbicides, helping customers at planting and nitrogen stabilizer benefits. Here is a look at the results from recent poll questions.

In April, readers shared the key benefits they discuss most with their customers when recommending a nitrogen stabilizer. ”Reduced nitrogen loss” and “Extended nitrogen availability during crop’s growth stages” topped the list followed by “Increased yield”. When it comes to reducing nitrogen loss, Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers work below the soil’s surface to extend nitrogen availability up to eight weeks in soil temperatures above 50 F.

Retailers provide many valuable services to farmers at planting, including planning for the year and answering questions about products. In February, 88 percent of readers said they primarily help customers by developing weed management plans, ensuring field fertility and delivering product. According to one reader, the most valuable service retailers provide to customers is “being there for them when they need you.”

Before helping customers at planting, retailers can face challenges when selling herbicides. In January, the majority of readers said their biggest challenge to selling herbicides is finding the right product to combat herbicide resistance. Readers also reported price and new technology that may not be familiar to customers as notable challenges.

When it comes to battling herbicide-resistant weeds, such as waterhemp, marestail and giant ragweed, Dow AgroSciences recommends using a program approach that starts with preemergence, residual herbicides followed by timely postemergence applications. This includes using Resicore® and SureStart® II herbicides in corn, Sonic® and Surveil® herbicides in soybeans, and Enlist Duo® herbicide as part of the Enlist weed control system in both corn and soybeans.

We enjoy hearing from you in each issue and invite you to take this month’s poll. For more information about Dow AgroSciences crop protection products, please contact your Dow AgroSciences sales representative or visit dowagro.com.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Instinct II, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Residual control through canopy

After excessive rain at planting, it’s common for farmers to question whether the herbicide they applied preemergence will deliver enough residual control into the growing season. Especially in seasons with delayed planting and spraying, farmers should apply an additional residual herbicide early postemergence to control weeds through canopy.

In seasons with a lot of rainfall, weeds have a longer germination period than normal and the residual length of early-applied herbicides may be shortened. When the length of residual control is threatened, weeds are given the chance to grow with young corn plants and rob yield because there isn’t shade from corn canopy yet. Farmers must carefully scout cornfields and apply an additional residual herbicide early postemergence to prevent late flushes of waterhemp and giant ragweed from competing with corn later in the season.

The program approach of SureStart® II herbicide applied preemergence followed by Resicore® herbicide early postemergence provides four modes of action to control the toughest weeds in corn, including herbicide-resistant species. Plus, farmers can add atrazine and glyphosate to the program for six different modes of action. Resicore is designed to control emerged weeds with extended residual control to control late weed escapes.

For more information about controlling weeds early postemergence, visit PowerOverWeeds.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

Allow corn to grow stronger by keeping fields clean before canopy.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Residual herbicides strengthen new weed control technologies

As new weed control technologies enter the market, farmers need to avoid repetitive use of the same active ingredient. Using residual herbicides in a program approach helps control tough weeds in multiple ways.

Sonic®, Surveil® and FirstRate® herbicides are approved tank-mix partners with several herbicides labeled for use in new weed control systems, including XtendiMax herbicide and Engenia herbicide, with additional tank-mix options expected in the near future. FirstRate also can be tank-mixed with FeXapan herbicide.

Adding Sonic, Surveil or FirstRate to your customers’ tank mix provides two additional nonglyphosate modes of action and long-lasting residual control of many tough weeds, including waterhemp, marestail, Palmer amaranth and giant ragweed. Help your customers build a strong program approach to improve yield potential and ROI. Here are five tips for cleaner fields:

  1. Incorporate tillage and/or a preplant herbicide burndown program to remove existing weeds.
  2. Use the full rate of a broad-spectrum, preemergence residual herbicide that targets your customers’ worst weeds.
  3. Apply multiple modes of action that have powerful activity on the Amaranthus species — pigweeds, waterhemps, Palmer amaranth and Powell amaranth.
  4. Choose the appropriate postemergence herbicide and be ready to apply sequential applications as needed. Strive for complete weed control to reduce the weed seed bank in the soil.
  5. Rotate crops and/or herbicide modes of action to sustain effective weed control and prevent future resistance.

For more information about how your customers can fight back against tough weeds this season, visit BattleWeeds.com.

Farmers planted more than 83,000,000 acres of soybeans in 2016, and more than 89,000,000 acres of soybeans in 2017. Improve soybean yield with residual herbicides as part of your weed control programs.

®DOW Diamond, FirstRate, Sonic and Surveil are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. XtendiMax is a trademark of Monsanto Technology LLC. Engenia is a trademark of BASF. FeXapan is a trademark of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Sonic and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC