Category Archives: Industry News

Strike out weeds with multiple herbicide modes of action

On a baseball field, few pitchers can keep hitters at bay throwing only one pitch. The most successful pitchers know how to change things up and keep hitters off balance. The same concept applies in farmers’ fields when it comes to weed control.

Successful weed control – both now and in the future – depends on attacking weeds with multiple herbicide modes of action. Retailers can help their customers develop smart game plans and adopt weed management technologies that allow them to keep weeds off balance and in check all growing season long.

The key? Develop a program approach that takes advantage of different herbicide modes of action. For instance, the Enlist weed control system is designed for burndown applications, preemergence residual applications and postemergence applications enabling the use of three or more modes of action to every field. Helping customers identify and use multiple modes of action gives them the opportunity for clean, weed-free fields.

Cover all the bases
A good weed control program starts will a clean field at planting. Burndown applications are important, even when weather issues delay planting. Retailers can help customers by recommending effective burndown herbicides such as Elevore®, Enlist One® or Enlist Duo® herbicides.

After planting, preemergence herbicides can add another mode of action. This can pick off weeds that have escaped or resisted the burndown treatment. Throwing a curve ball at weeds can subdue them and help the crop get off to a good, strong start.

“We need to get residual herbicides on the crop to suppress weeds, even when weather may tempt us to skip our preemergence applications,” says Shawna Hubbard, Trait Herbicides Product Manager for Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont. “Be consistent in using appropriate rates for weed pressure in the field. This ensures we’re helping prolong control of weeds until we’re ready to make postemergence applications.”

Remind customers to consider preemergent herbicides that offer solid residual activity AND offer a different mode of action than their burndown or postemergence herbicides. For instance, Sonic® herbicide offers two modes of action while Trivence® herbicide delivers three modes of action.

A good scouting report
Once the crop has emerged, farmers need to scout their fields and act promptly when weeds begin to appear. Follow label directions; however, it’s generally best to hit weeds when they’re small and more likely to succumb to the postemergence treatment.

Timing is critical to maximize control of any postemergence application. Make sure customers are basing decisions on the size of the weeds and not the calendar alone.

“Sometimes, we may need to make an initial postemergence herbicide application earlier than we had planned,” Hubbard says. “With Enlist One or Enlist Duo herbicides, farmers should apply when weeds are no more than 6 inches tall.”

Get the bullpen ready
If you need to follow up with a second postemergence application due to a later flush of weeds, the Enlist weed control system gives you flexibility. The wider application window helps hit weeds when they are vulnerable. In addition, both Enlist herbicides feature 2,4-D choline with inherently low volatility. For two modes of action, choose either Enlist Duo with glyphosate or tank mix Enlist One with glufosinate.

Farmers who learn to change up their herbicide modes of action can keep striking out weeds all summer long. The result can be a sweet victory celebration at harvest.

Learn more about the Enlist weed control system at Enlist.com or by using the Enlist Ahead resource. Also check out the YouTube channel or Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

Using an array of herbicides that offer multiple modes of action goes a long way in producing a farmer’s “field of dreams.”

™®Elevore, Enlist Duo, Enlist One, Sonic and Trivence are trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Q&A: Herbicide resistance in the Upper Midwest

Herbicide-resistant weeds are top threats to corn and soybean yield potential. Jeff Moon, market development specialist with Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, recently shared insights on the state of resistant weeds and herbicide options. Moon works with retailers and territory managers with Corteva Agriscience in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Read the Q&A below for Moon’s advice to control resistant weeds this season.

  1. What are the top three herbicide-resistant weeds affecting corn and soybean farmers in your area?
    Waterhemp, giant ragweed and lambsquarters, in that order. Waterhemp is in the pigweed family, which has known resistance issues, so it seems to be the focus of conversations right now.
  2. Which herbicide-resistant weeds have most recently shown up?
    The further west you go, kochia becomes an issue. We’re also having discussions about Palmer amaranth moving in and the concerns about that. In the heart of corn and soybean country, the herbicide-resistant weeds we mostly see are waterhemp, giant and common ragweed and lambsquarters.
  3. When new resistance is found in your area, what is the first step to combating it?
    It starts with a discussion between the retailer and farmer. They both pay attention to local conditions, agronomy news and university research. Farmers are on the look-out for new threats and will make an adjustment if needed. Before changing products, they might just tweak their current program to make it better. This means they might change herbicide rates or if they’re doing one pass, they’ll adjust to a two-pass or change the tank mix.
  4. Which herbicides are particularly effective on these herbicide-resistant species?
    We are fortunate to have several residual and burndown products from Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, that fit the way growers want to farm.

    If your customers are using a multi-product approach in corn, one of the best ways to control resistant weeds is to use SureStart® II herbicide or Resicore® herbicide pre- or postemergence. I’ve seen farmers have success putting Surpass® NXT herbicide or Keystone® NXT herbicide down first, then use SureStart II or Resicore over the top on the second pass to control remaining weeds and add a residual layer. This is a great one-two punch to get corn to canopy.

    In soybeans, it starts with a strong preemerge. Sonic® and Surveil® herbicides are great options to control broadleaf weeds early. In a burndown situation, DuPont Enlite® herbicide can burndown emerged weeds and provide residual activity. Another burndown option is Elevore® herbicide, which prevents regrowth of many resistant weeds, including marestail. Elevore has a low use rate and fits well in reduced or no-till systems.

Talk with your local territory manager from Corteva Agriscience or go to Corteva.US to learn more about corn and soybean herbicides that can help your customers control herbicide-resistant weeds.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Keystone NXT is a Restricted Use Pesticide. Keystone NXT is not registered for sale, distribution or used in all states. Elevore, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II, Surpass NXT and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT, Resicore, SureStart II and Surpass NXT are not registered for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Survey says … this weed is the most challenging in soybean fields

While there are dozens of common weeds that threaten soybean yields, a recent survey found a clear winner when it comes to robbing retailers of more sleep — and farmers of more yield potential.

Corteva Agriscience asked a group of 100 retailers from across 12 north-central states this question: “What is the most challenging herbicide-resistant weed in your area?” The definitive winner was waterhemp — which was named by 58 percent of retailers — more than all other weed species combined.

Marestail was a distant second, at 23 percent, followed by giant ragweed at 7 percent, and Palmer amaranth and kochia, both at 6 percent.

herbicide resistant weed chart

Jeff Moon wasn’t surprised by the results.

“It’s consistent with recent conversations we’ve had with customers, whether out in the field or at industry events,” Moon says. “We work diligently to keep tabs on the currently challenging weed issues, so we can be ready to help with tailored solutions.” 

Why it’s challenging, and tips for more effective management
Waterhemp is seen as the most challenging for a couple reasons. First, it’s become resistant to multiple herbicides — not just glyphosate. In fact, researchers have identified a waterhemp population in Missouri that is resistant to a record-breaking six herbicide mechanisms of action.1 Second, it shows no signs of slowing its spread to infest soybean fields in new states. 

Of particular concern is that this season many farmers could be looking at a one-two punch from marestail and waterhemp. That’s because it’s expected that marestail will emerge in high numbers this spring after the cool, wet conditions many areas experienced last fall. These conditions, along with a delayed harvest, provided an ideal situation for winter annuals like marestail to germinate and become established. If farmers pass on a burndown application, marestail can be expected to quickly cause problems in soybean fields. 

“A good burndown herbicide application — either in fall or early spring — is very effective against actively growing winter annuals like marestail,” Moon says. “Elevore herbicide provides excellent control of marestail up to 8 inches tall, and works in challenging conditions.”

But burndown herbicides won’t work on later-emerging summer annuals like waterhemp. For that, Moon recommends farmers scout often, implement a diverse action plan and use a program herbicide approach with multiple modes of action. Below he provides several tips for better waterhemp management:  

  • Scout early and often. It’s critical to identify waterhemp early, then continue to check fields through midsummer. Ongoing scouting helps farmers plan timely postemergence herbicide applications. While scouting, make note of potential problem spots for the following year. Waterhemp is often misidentified with its cousins in the pigweed family, such as Palmer amaranth. When identifying waterhemp, check the leaves. Waterhemp leaves are generally longer and more lance-shaped than other pigweeds.  
  • Reduce row spacing at planting. Planting narrower rows can help suppress waterhemp growth by reducing the time it takes for crops to reach canopy closure. 
  • Layer residual herbicides. Layering residual herbicides keeps fields clean longer, typically through crop canopy closure, to manage the waterhemp seedbank. In soybeans, Moon recommends Sonic® herbicide for two modes of action preemergence, followed by an application of EverpreX herbicide over the top of soybeans for an additional mode of action. Farmers may also add glyphosate, in areas where waterhemp isn’t resistant, to increase the modes of action. 
  • Keep weeds from going to seed. Just a few waterhemp weeds left in a field can mean significant problems next season. Waterhemp that goes to seed in soybean fields can potentially cross-pollinate with a population in another field and build additional resistance. Tillage also can help lower waterhemp populations because in order to germinate and emerge, its seeds must be in the top inch of soil and they are relatively short lived. 
  • Maximize application technology. Pay close attention to herbicide labels to maximize the efficacy of the product. Not every herbicide can be applied in the same manner with the same nozzle, water volume, pressure and adjuvant.
  • Rotate crops. Waterhemp requires herbicide control and effective cultural practices, like rotating crops. This should be planned for more than a single year at a time, Moon says. Rotating crops also allows farmers to alternate modes of action and adjust tilling plans for corn and soybean fields.

“It’s critical to start with a strong treatment plan for winter annuals like marestail, then be ready with a diverse plan of action for waterhemp,” Moon says. “Otherwise, you risk a significant drop in yield potential, and the weeds will only get tougher to control down the line.”

For more information, including product labels, visit Sonic® herbicide, EverpreX herbicide and Elevore® herbicide.

waterhemp

Waterhemp can be a giant pain in soybean fields without effective management

1Shergill, L.S., B.R. Barlow and M.D. Bish. 2018. Investigations of 2,4-D and Multiple Herbicide Resistance in a Missouri Waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis) Population in Weed Science Vol. 66, Issue 3.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Arylex is a registered active ingredient. Elevore and Sonic are not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. EverpreX is not registered in all states. See your DuPont retailer or representative for availability in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Be inspired by the Power to Do More winners

The Power to Do More contest recognizes worthy farmers not only for what they produce in their fields but also for their exceptional commitment to the communities in which they farm. Farmers often spend as much time and effort working with local organizations as they do ensuring their cornfields stay clean through harvest.

In 2018 we asked farmers to submit photos that embody what gives them the power to do more on their farms. Online voting determined the top three winners, who each saw donations made to their nonprofit of choice from the corn herbicides portfolio of Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont.

These inspiring documentaries show how these three families have the power to do more — in their fields and in their communities. Click the links below to meet the Schroeders from Iowa, the Krauses from Minnesota and the Gutterys from Kansas.

Corteva Agriscience is proud to showcase these winners and to support all American farmers with a lineup of corn herbicides dedicated to delivering the power to do more every season:
Resicore® herbicideSureStart® II herbicideDuPont Realm® Q herbicideDuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide and Keystone® NXT herbicide.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Cinch ATZ and Keystone NXT are Restricted Use Pesticides. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Timely Residual and Enlist™ Herbicide Applications Foil Weeds

They say timing is everything. When it comes to weed control, that’s close to the truth. Timing certainly is important.

Farmers who put together a successful weed control program need to make timely herbicide applications from before planting through their postemergence applications. Retailers can help their customers make plans that allow for these timely applications.

Into the field earlier
Changes in planting dates may require changes in traditional herbicide application dates, says Shawna Hubbard, Product Manager for Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont.

“As we plant earlier and earlier, farmers need to adjust their herbicide applications,” Hubbard says. Any operation applying growth regulators – such as glyphosate, 2,4-D or dicamba – early in the year needs to ensure the temperatures are warm enough that weeds are actually growing. If they’re not actively growing, these herbicides will be less effective.

“We also need to get residual herbicides on before weeds can gain a foothold,” Hubbard says. “Because we’re applying residuals earlier, we may need to consider using higher rates: We’re often asking them to control weeds an extra two, three or four weeks before we apply postemergence treatments.”

Weeds dictate application timing
Timing is critical for postemergence applications as well. Hubbard suggests applicators base treatments on the size of the weeds, not the calendar.

“It’s better to go a little earlier than you traditionally would,” she says. “For instance, with Enlist One or Enlist Duo herbicides, we should be applying when weeds are no more than 4 to 6 inches tall. If you’re worried about a second flush of weeds after your postemergence application, you have a couple of solutions.”

Adding a qualified residual herbicide to your postemergence tank mix can extend protection. Qualified herbicides for tank-mixing with Enlist One and Enlist Duo® herbicides are listed at EnlistTankMix.com. In addition, if farmers apply postemergence herbicides a bit early, they can always come back with another round of an Enlist herbicide or glufosinate over Enlist cotton or Enlist soybeans.

“Don’t wait for late flushes of weeds to make your first postemergence application,” Hubbard says. “Weather could delay that application and put a lot of pressure on your residuals to hold the fort.”

Spring delays in 2018 meant some growers never got a residual down. That, in turn, required early postemergence applications. Wet field conditions meant some of these applications couldn’t be made until weeds were considerably larger than ideal for complete control.

Time to start planning
For 2019, Hubbard cites four goals that can help make a weed control program more successful:

  • Start with a clean field at planting.
  • Use residual herbicides that feature more than a single mode of action.
  • Make timely applications of postemergence herbicides. For Enlist herbicides, this means spraying before weeds reach 4 to 6 inches.
  • Add an appropriate residual herbicide to your postemergence product to extend the efficacy of this application.

Farmers who keep weeds under wraps all season long reap benefits in the fall. A weed-free field at harvest not only makes it easier to combine the crop but also limits the spread of weed seed.

Find out more by talking to a Corteva Agriscience field rep, by going to Enlist.com or by using the Enlist Ahead resource. Also check out the YouTube channel or Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

dead weed

Timely herbicide applications, from preplanting to postemergence, can help put tough weeds in their place.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

A clean spring starts with a preemergence herbicide

As your customers evaluate this season’s yield and adjust their weed control plans for next season, reinforce the value of a preemergence herbicide with them for a clean start. By relying only on postemergence applications, waterhemp, marestail and other common weeds can start robbing corn and soybean yield right after planting.

Spring is a vulnerable time for crops as they require a strong start to thrive for the rest of the season. In an April poll on OperationCleanFields.com, most retailers — 58 percent — selected waterhemp as their customers’ most challenging weed followed by marestail at 23 percent.

Marestail is generally considered the most difficult weed to control if it can overwinter into the spring. When this happens, marestail grows rapidly as temperatures warm, robbing soil of two critical inputs: moisture and nitrogen. Since marestail can germinate throughout the entire year, it’s important for retailers and farmers to scout for it year-round and identify it early in the rosette stage for effective control.

The photos below were taken in McLean, Nebraska, on July 9, 2018. McLean is in the Northeast part of the state and where marestail is one of the biggest weed challenges. The fields shown received spring applications of Sonic® herbicide in soybeans and Resicore® herbicide in corn to allow the crops to grow with less weed competition.

“To reduce the spread of resistant weed populations, such as marestail and waterhemp, farmers should plan their herbicide control and crop rotation for more than a single year at a time,” says Dave Roome, customer technical specialist, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont. “The most important tip for farmers fighting these weeds in their corn or soybean fields is to act early by starting with a preemergence herbicide to keep weeds small and easier to control.”

Talk with your Corteva Agriscience territory manager about how you can help your customers get a jump on weeds in corn and soybean fields next spring. For more information about Resicore and Sonic, visit PowerOverWeeds.com and BattleWeeds.com, respectively.

Nebraska soybean field protected by Sonic herbicide.

A Nebraska soybean field is protected by a preemergence application of Sonic® herbicide.

Nebraska cornfield protected by Resicore herbicide

Resicore® herbicide gave this Nebraska cornfield a powerful start against yield-robbing weeds, such as marestail and waterhemp.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Resicore and Sonic are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not registered for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions.

Three steps to identify a proven nitrogen stabilizer

Nitrogen stabilizers are one option to protect nitrogen; however, the market is saturated with products that claim to protect nitrogen. With fall purchasing decisions around the corner, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, has identified key criteria to help farmers select a proven nitrogen stabilizer that is right for them.

Weeding through the myriad of stabilizer products can be tricky, and timely factors like commodity prices, trade negotiations and nutrient management regulations make finding the best option even more important. Corteva Agriscience recommends that farmers use three criteria in determining the right nitrogen stabilizer to use:

  1. Leverage University-supported research
    Use stabilizers that have been rigorously tested and proven by universities. Farmers should ask their retailers to share academic research that supports the claims that are being touted.
  2. Check labeling to ensure it meets EPA registration guidelines
    Use stabilizers that also follow EPA registration guidelines. These guidelines require robust documentation and research to support claims that relate to the effectiveness of a nitrogen stabilizer product.
  3. Prioritize value
    The current economics of farming may not be as rewarding as a few years ago, so every penny matters. Stabilizers can be viewed as an insurance policy to protect crop yield and preserve a farmer’s investments. Whether you’re concerned about nitrogen being a yield-limiting factor or concerned about nitrogen loss impacting water quality, nitrogen should always be protected.

Two options that meet this criteria set are Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers. Instinct and N-Serve maximize nitrogen by extending its availability for up to eight weeks, during critical growth stages for corn and wheat, helping crops deliver the maximum yield at harvest. To learn more, visit MaxInMaxOut.com, or contact your local Corteva Agriscience territory manager.

®™Trademark of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences