Ramping Up Enlist E3™ Soybean Offerings for Your Customers

By: Shawna Hubbard, herbicides product manager, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont          

Shawna Hubbard

In January, we got some tremendous news for soybean farmers. Enlist E3 soybeans received import authorizations from China and the Philippines, and we announced launch plans. Commercial volumes of Enlist E3 soybeans are available now.

This summer, we’ll be able to help more farmers get a first-hand look at the Enlist system, including Enlist herbicides, and the differences this weed control system offers. We’re expanding grower experiences with demonstration plots, field technology days and other education activities.

Robust ramp-up plans are underway, including extensive seed production to ensure that Enlist E3 soybeans are broadly available to farmers in 2020.

To bring this important technology to more farmers, we’ll broadly license Enlist E3 soybeans to the industry. In 2020, we expect to achieve 10 percent market share in soybeans thanks to the performance and weed control advantages possible with Enlist E3 soybeans.

Weed control and crop performance
It’s important to understand Enlist E3 soybeans offer more than exceptional weed control: These soybeans deliver excellent yield potential. Enlist E3 soybeans provide the most advanced trait technology for a new standard of weed control and yield performance.

Growers can preserve more of the yield potential of an Enlist E3 soybean variety by eliminating weeds – using Enlist herbicides as the cornerstone of a full weed management program approach – and retaining more natural resources for the crop. Because of our industry-leading breeding program, Enlist E3 soybeans will be in elite genetics and will be available in a range of maturities.

Finally, Enlist herbicides provide growers peace of mind. Enlist herbicides contain 2,4-D choline with Colex-D® technology to deliver near-zero volatility and reduce drift. Farmers are realizing these products stay where they’re sprayed. Growers who follow the label are building confidence in the efficacy and ease of use with the Enlist system.

Planning a program approach
You can help your growers stay ahead of weeds by planning a season-long strategy for weed management. Start clean with a burndown application. Consider Elevore® herbicide with Arylex® active to help customers get the season started right. Follow with effective residual herbicides: The Corteva portfolio includes Sonic®, Trivence® and EverpreX.

Finally, make timely postemergence applications of an Enlist herbicide when weeds are small and actively growing. Using multiple modes of action improves weed control. Enlist herbicides give your customers the flexibility of additional postemergence modes of action. Enlist Duo® herbicide conveniently combines 2,4-D choline and glyphosate. Or you may suggest growers use Enlist One herbicide for additional tank-mix flexibility to target specific weeds, including those susceptible to glufosinate.

Retailers can take advantage of many online tools, including the Product Use Guide, Sprayer Cleanout Guide, Application Guide and the Enlist Ahead detailer, which includes information on the Enlist Ahead app, incentives and other benefits. More information is available at Experiencing Enlist or by visiting our YouTube channel and following us on Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

About the author: Shawna Hubbard is herbicides product manager for Corteva Agriscience™, the Agriculture Division of DowDuPont. She works to deliver information about the Enlist™ weed control system to media, retailers and farmers.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist E3 soybeans were jointly developed by Dow AgroSciences and MS Technologies. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Have your customers entered the Power to Do More contest yet?

Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, encourages corn farmers to show the world photos of their powerful inspirations as part of the 2019 Power to Do More contest. The contest, sponsored by the corn herbicides portfolio of Corteva Agriscience, honors farmers and their commitment to their communities.

Power To Do More ProgramYour corn-growing customers can enter the contest by visiting PowerToDoMore.com by Sunday, April 28, 2019, for a chance to win the grand prize of $10,000 for a local nonprofit of choice or two second place prizes of $5,000 for their selected nonprofits.

This is the third year of the Power to Do More contest. The 2018 contest winners – the Schroeders from Iowa, the Krauses from Minnesota and the Gutterys from Kansas — supported local FFA chapters and a county community foundation. Their stories are featured in three short videos that show their dedication to farming.

“Farmers are often the bedrock of small communities throughout the U.S. Many invest their time and effort working with local organizations,” said Lyndsie Kaehler, U.S. Corn Herbicides Product Manager, Corteva Agriscience. “The Power to Do More contest recognizes farmers not only for what they produce in their fields, but also for their exceptional commitment to the communities in which they farm. It’s been inspiring to hear the stories of past contest entrants and we are excited to meet more powerful farmers through this year’s contest.”

Photo entries may include fields, family, friends, pets, equipment — whatever means the most to the entrant. Up to 10 finalists will be selected for community voting. The finalists with the most votes by July 8 will win. Follow along on social media at #PowerOverWeeds.

Corteva Agriscience is proud to support farmers with a lineup of corn herbicides dedicated to delivering the power to do more every season: With Resicore®, SureStart® II, DuPont Realm® Q, DuPont Cinch® ATZ and Keystone® NXT herbicides, farmers can effectively control and spend less time worrying about unwanted, yield-robbing weeds.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Cinch ATZ and Keystone NXT are Restricted Use Pesticides. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Survey says … this weed is the most challenging in soybean fields

While there are dozens of common weeds that threaten soybean yields, a recent survey found a clear winner when it comes to robbing retailers of more sleep — and farmers of more yield potential.

Corteva Agriscience asked a group of 100 retailers from across 12 north-central states this question: “What is the most challenging herbicide-resistant weed in your area?” The definitive winner was waterhemp — which was named by 58 percent of retailers — more than all other weed species combined.

Marestail was a distant second, at 23 percent, followed by giant ragweed at 7 percent, and Palmer amaranth and kochia, both at 6 percent.

herbicide resistant weed chart

Jeff Moon wasn’t surprised by the results.

“It’s consistent with recent conversations we’ve had with customers, whether out in the field or at industry events,” Moon says. “We work diligently to keep tabs on the currently challenging weed issues, so we can be ready to help with tailored solutions.” 

Why it’s challenging, and tips for more effective management
Waterhemp is seen as the most challenging for a couple reasons. First, it’s become resistant to multiple herbicides — not just glyphosate. In fact, researchers have identified a waterhemp population in Missouri that is resistant to a record-breaking six herbicide mechanisms of action.1 Second, it shows no signs of slowing its spread to infest soybean fields in new states. 

Of particular concern is that this season many farmers could be looking at a one-two punch from marestail and waterhemp. That’s because it’s expected that marestail will emerge in high numbers this spring after the cool, wet conditions many areas experienced last fall. These conditions, along with a delayed harvest, provided an ideal situation for winter annuals like marestail to germinate and become established. If farmers pass on a burndown application, marestail can be expected to quickly cause problems in soybean fields. 

“A good burndown herbicide application — either in fall or early spring — is very effective against actively growing winter annuals like marestail,” Moon says. “Elevore herbicide provides excellent control of marestail up to 8 inches tall, and works in challenging conditions.”

But burndown herbicides won’t work on later-emerging summer annuals like waterhemp. For that, Moon recommends farmers scout often, implement a diverse action plan and use a program herbicide approach with multiple modes of action. Below he provides several tips for better waterhemp management:  

  • Scout early and often. It’s critical to identify waterhemp early, then continue to check fields through midsummer. Ongoing scouting helps farmers plan timely postemergence herbicide applications. While scouting, make note of potential problem spots for the following year. Waterhemp is often misidentified with its cousins in the pigweed family, such as Palmer amaranth. When identifying waterhemp, check the leaves. Waterhemp leaves are generally longer and more lance-shaped than other pigweeds.  
  • Reduce row spacing at planting. Planting narrower rows can help suppress waterhemp growth by reducing the time it takes for crops to reach canopy closure. 
  • Layer residual herbicides. Layering residual herbicides keeps fields clean longer, typically through crop canopy closure, to manage the waterhemp seedbank. In soybeans, Moon recommends Sonic® herbicide for two modes of action preemergence, followed by an application of EverpreX herbicide over the top of soybeans for an additional mode of action. Farmers may also add glyphosate, in areas where waterhemp isn’t resistant, to increase the modes of action. 
  • Keep weeds from going to seed. Just a few waterhemp weeds left in a field can mean significant problems next season. Waterhemp that goes to seed in soybean fields can potentially cross-pollinate with a population in another field and build additional resistance. Tillage also can help lower waterhemp populations because in order to germinate and emerge, its seeds must be in the top inch of soil and they are relatively short lived. 
  • Maximize application technology. Pay close attention to herbicide labels to maximize the efficacy of the product. Not every herbicide can be applied in the same manner with the same nozzle, water volume, pressure and adjuvant.
  • Rotate crops. Waterhemp requires herbicide control and effective cultural practices, like rotating crops. This should be planned for more than a single year at a time, Moon says. Rotating crops also allows farmers to alternate modes of action and adjust tilling plans for corn and soybean fields.

“It’s critical to start with a strong treatment plan for winter annuals like marestail, then be ready with a diverse plan of action for waterhemp,” Moon says. “Otherwise, you risk a significant drop in yield potential, and the weeds will only get tougher to control down the line.”

For more information, including product labels, visit Sonic® herbicide, EverpreX herbicide and Elevore® herbicide.

waterhemp

Waterhemp can be a giant pain in soybean fields without effective management

1Shergill, L.S., B.R. Barlow and M.D. Bish. 2018. Investigations of 2,4-D and Multiple Herbicide Resistance in a Missouri Waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis) Population in Weed Science Vol. 66, Issue 3.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Arylex is a registered active ingredient. Elevore and Sonic are not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. EverpreX is not registered in all states. See your DuPont retailer or representative for availability in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Weed of the Month: Common Lambsquarters

  • Common LambsquartersCommon name: Common lambsquarters
  • Scientific name: Chenopodium album1
  • Grass or broadleaf: Summer annual broadleaf1
  • Germination timing: Common lambsquarters emerges early in the growing season, so it is key to control this weed with a postemergence herbicide prior to reaching maximum control heights.1
  • The seeds of common lambsquarters can remain dormant for many years. Fifty percent of seeds have been found to survive for 12 years, 32 percent have been found to survive for 20 years and one percent of seeds has been found to last 78 years.1
  • The cotyledons and early leaves appear blue-green on the top and a purple-red on the underside of the leaf.2

Fast facts

  • Common lambsquarters can grow up to five feet tall.2
  • Night tilling, also known as dark tillage, will reduce the emergence by 30 percent to 70 percent.1
  • Including small grains into crop rotation can suppress the growth of lambsquarters.1
  • Mature common lambsquarters’ leaves are pale green, triangular and up to 2 inches in length.2
  • The new leaves on common lambsquarters can be identified by their white, waxy coating.2
  • Common lambsquarters can produce 30,000-176,000 seeds per plant.1
  • The flowers of the common lambsquarters bloom from May to November.2

Resistance statistics*

  • According to WeedScience.org, herbicide-resistant common lambsquarters (mostly to PSII (WSSA Group 5) inhibitors) has been discovered in 22 states:* Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

*Resistance confirmation does not include all weeds and may vary among different areas of each state.

Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, offers the following weed control solutions:

Corn Herbicides

DuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore® herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
FulTime® NXT herbicide
Keystone® LA NXT herbicide
Keystone® NXT herbicide
DuPont Realm® Q herbicide
Resicore® herbicide
SureStart® II herbicide

Soybean Herbicides
Durango® DMA® herbicide
Elevore herbicide
Enlist Duo® herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
Enlist One herbicide, as part of the Enlist weed control system
DuPont EverpreX® herbicide
FirstRate® herbicide
Sonic® herbicide
Surveil® herbicide
DuPont Trivence® herbicide
DuPontEnlite® herbicide
DuPontAfforia® herbicide
DuPont™ FeXapan™ herbicide Plus VaporGrip® Technology


Sources:

1Michigan State University, Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences 2019. Common Lambsquarters. https://www.canr.msu.edu/weeds/extension/common-lambsquarters
2University of California Integrated Pest Management 2019. Common lambsquarters.  http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/WEEDS/lambsquarters.html

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Cinch ATZ, FeXapan, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT and Keystone NXT are federally Restricted Use Pesticides. Cinch ATZ, Durango DMA, Elevore, FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Realm, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II, Surveil and Trivence are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. FulTime NXT, Keystone LA NXT, Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. DuPont™ FeXapan® herbicide Plus VaporGrip® Technology is not registered for sale in all states. Contact your local DuPont retailer or representative for details and availability in your state. EverpreX is not registered in all states. See your DuPont retailer or representative for availability in your state. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Tips for finding the right corn herbicide program for your customers

By: Lyndsie Kaehler, U.S. Corn Herbicides Product Manager, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont   

Lyndsie KaehlerWinter is an opportunity to reflect and make plans for the upcoming season. Since every farmer, field and season is different, retailers are challenged to develop customized weed control programs to fit customers’ unique needs each year. As you create 2019 corn herbicide plans, here are three key areas to consider.

Attack weeds early and often.
Give your customers’ corn the strongest start possible by layering residual herbicides to control tough weeds. Uncontrolled weeds steal crucial nutrients, sun and water from young corn plants and ultimately, rob yield. Some of the fiercest weed competition, such as marestail, waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, have long germination periods and spread to more fields each year.

Start with a preemergence herbicide to control early weed flushes. Then, come back with a postemergence residual herbicide to control weed escapes and prevent competition from later-emerging weeds.

Recommend corn herbicides with ultimate dependability.
The corn herbicides portfolio of Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, is designed to fit the way farmers grow corn, so they can spend less time worrying about unwanted, yield-robbing weeds. Our corn herbicides offer dependability and application flexibility to deal with the unexpected. Here is a quick look at how each product can help your customers:

  • Resicore® herbicide is effective, with versatile application timing and residual control lasting deep into the growing season.
  • SureStart® II herbicide is proven to control weeds when it matters most — during the early developmental stages of corn growth.
  • DuPont Realm® Q herbicide is a great postemergence option with multiple modes of action and built-in safener technology that can be applied under diverse weather conditions.
  • Keystone® NXT herbicide is consistent, providing a wide spectrum of weed control, and only requires ¼ inch of rain to activate.
  • DuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide delivers peace of mind and flexibility through early weed control, especially for farmers needing rotational flexibility.

Offer new savings for your customers
These corn herbicides are part of the all-new, rebate-free TruChoice® offer. You can register at truchoiceonline.com to learn about two ways to offer farmers upfront savings on their crop protection and qualified seed purchases. It can help build your business while improving customers’ cash flow. 

We look forward to working with you this season. Talk with your territory manager from Corteva Agriscience about finding the right corn herbicide for your needs.


About the author: Lyndsie Kaehler is the corn herbicides product manager at Corteva Agriscience
, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont. Lyndsie joined Corteva Agriscience, formerly known as Dow AgroSciences, in 2012 and is based in Indianapolis.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Cinch ATZ and Keystone NXT are Restricted Use Pesticides. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Successful Weed Control Makes Future Use of Enlist™ Corn a Sure Thing

For Todd Lay, the decision whether to continue using Mycogen® hybrids with the Enlist trait has already been made. The performance of Enlist Duo® herbicide with Enlist corn this summer has convinced him to try the technology again.

“The weed control was excellent,” Lay says. “We controlled our Palmer amaranth and waterhemp.”

Lay raises corn, soybeans and alfalfa, with nearly all his acres under irrigation. He uses a combination of ridge tillage and vertical tillage, planting on the ridges. Weed control has been a challenge for the Glenvil, Nebraska, farmer.

This year, he started out with Resicore® corn herbicide, which offers residual activity. He followed postemergence with Enlist Duo® herbicide and says he didn’t have to use anything else this year.

“We’ve had some isolated areas with weed issues,” he reports. “This year it’s clean. There are no weeds there.”

High yields, happy ending
It’s been a good year for corn and soybean yield for Lay. His corn was about 10-15 bushels above average. He says the Enlist hybrids are yielding as good as or better than his other hybrids.

Just as important, he says Enlist Duo stayed on target during application and didn’t volatilize afterward.

“Some of my soybeans were burned by drift this year,” Lay says. “I don’t want herbicides I use to drift into other fields. I think Enlist Duo is a better option for me than other new herbicides.”

Burndown sets the stage

“We did a burndown with Resicore and glyphosate to start off clean,” Lay says. “I applied Enlist Duo postemergence. The application was excellent. It was easy to apply. I saw no drift or volatility.

“It wasn’t that hard to find time to spray according to the label direction,” Lay says. “We sprayed some near a neighbor’s conventional soybeans and some near our own soybeans. We saw no issues with ours and had no complaints from the neighbor.”

Some of his irrigation pivots are half corn, half soybeans. Even conventional soybeans right next to Enlist hybrids were unaffected.

“Enlist Duo doesn’t seem to have the volatility we have with other products,” Lay says. “Tank cleanout is easy, too. We just triple rinse, which is what we always do.”

Success breeds belief
Lay’s experience has convinced him the Enlist weed control system has a place on his farm.

“I’ve already ordered more Enlist corn for 2019,” he says. “Some people around here planted it so they could use DuPont Assure II herbicide to control volunteer corn.”

He talks with other area farmers and will tell them about the use of Enlist Duo herbicide in his fields. His message: “It works. It doesn’t drift. It’s as simple as that.”

Visit ExperiencingEnlist.com to learn more about the experiences of Lay and other farmers who’ve used the Enlist weed control system. For more information, go to the YouTube channel and follow on Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

Todd Lay

Todd Lay of Glenvil, Nebraska, got excellent control of his most troublesome weeds with a program that included Enlist Duo® herbicide.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Dow AgroSciences LLC