Tag Archives: Industry News

Flexibility to Fit Your Customers’ Farms

3 Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • Flexibility is key to creating tailored weed control programs for your customers.
  • The corn herbicides portfolio from Corteva Agriscience offers several program options that can meet your customers’ individual needs.
  • Download the Corn Herbicide Application Flexibility Guide

As a retailer, you know that every farm has individual needs when it comes to weed control. Every season, your challenge is to develop a program that best meets the needs of each of your customers’ operations. Working with a flexible herbicide portfolio is key.

The corn herbicides portfolio from Corteva Agriscience makes it easy to recommend the right weed control program. Do your customers want a one- or two-pass approach? Do they need preemergence and postemergence options? What kind of residual control are your farmers looking for?

To answer these questions and more, download the Corn Herbicide Application Flexibility Guide. As an example, for customers looking for a two-pass approach, there’s the following recommendations:

  • Two-pass Programs:
    • Pass 1 — preplant to preemergence (Choose 1 of the 4 herbicides listed.)
      • Resicore® herbicide, 1.5 to 1.75 qt./A; SureStart® II herbicide, 2 to 3 pt./A; Keystone® NXT herbicide, 1.5 to 2.5 qt./A; or DuPont Cinch® ATZ herbicide, 2 to 3 qt./A
    • Pass 2
      • Option 1: postemergence (up to 11-inch corn)
        • Resicore, 1.25 to 1.5 qt./A; or SureStart II, 2 pt./A
      • Option 2: postemergence (up to 20-inch corn)
        • DuPont Realm® Q herbicide, 4 oz./A

To find labels for each of the products listed in the guide, visit the Corn Herbicides Portfolio page on Corteva.us.

And remember: The efficacy of the programs described in the guide depends on factors like your location and soil types. So, be sure to talk with your Corteva Agriscience territory manager to make the very best plan for your customers.

sun shining on cornfield

Corteva Agriscience has corn herbicides to fit any farm.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Cinch ATZ and Keystone NXT are Restricted Use Pesticides. Keystone NXT is not available for sale, distribution or use in all states. Cinch ATZ, Realm Q, Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Keystone NXT, Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

Clean Sprayer Equipment Thoroughly Between Herbicides, Keep Customers Happy

3 Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • Clean all sprayer equipment before entering a field of Enlist E3 soybeans.
  • Clean all the equipment again after spraying an Enlist herbicide. Use a triple rinse and clean as soon as possible after spraying.
  • Make sure to clean all parts and components that come in contact with a herbicide: Think beyond the tank.

We often hear farmers and applicators talk about tank cleanout. But herbicides come into contact with many parts of the sprayer and transfer equipment, so applicators should clean the entire spraying system to prevent potential damage to the next crop.

“Follow label directions for a good, clean start,” says Dan Puck, Enlist field specialist. “As we come into the field, we want to make sure all our equipment is clean and we aren’t carrying any residual traces of herbicide on that equipment.”

For example, Puck says, make sure you don’t have corn herbicides or dicamba contamination if you’re entering a field of Enlist E3 soybeans.

“When you’re done spraying an Enlist herbicide, it’s time to clean out your equipment again before moving into another field,” Puck says. “It’s better to clean your equipment as soon as possible after spraying. It’s a best practice not to let your equipment sit overnight with herbicide residues in the system.”

Enlist herbicides require a triple-rinse process, a common sprayer tank cleanout practice. If you use a tank cleaner, use it during the second rinse step.

But don’t stop at the tank. Be sure to clean all the parts the herbicide reaches.

“You want to make sure you get all the parts and components of the system,” Puck says. “That includes things like your pumps, filters, screens, nozzles, booms and the boom ends. Make sure the entire system is cleaned out.”

Puck says cleanout applies to any other equipment that comes in contact with herbicides such as a tender tank and transfer equipment.

“Specific directions are on the label and in the Enlist product use guide,” Puck says. “It’s a good idea to review them until you’re thoroughly familiar with and comfortable with the appropriate cleanout process.”

Learn more about the Enlist weed control system and Enlist herbicides at Enlist.com. Follow Enlist with @EnlistOnline on Twitter or go to the YouTube channel for Enlist.

Suggested Tweet to Your Customers: Equipment cleanout is important when moving from one herbicide technology to another. Read the label and remove residues that could contaminate a crop. #weedcontrol

cleaning sprayer equipment

Make sure all equipment is clean as you move from one herbicide trait to another. This will keep your farmer customers happy and save you a lot of potential concerns.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Liberty herbicide and the Liberty herbicide logo are registered trademarks of BASF. The transgenic soybean event in Enlist E3 soybeans is jointly developed and owned by Dow AgroSciences LLC and MS Technologies LLC. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions.  © 2020 Corteva.

Being the person your customers can trust

Three Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • January is a good time to reevaluate your relationships with your customers. How can you be a good partner for growers heading into a new season?
  • Illinois farmer Allen Tompkins and his retailer Troy Leininger discuss how important it is for a farmer and retailer to have a trusted working relationship for a successful growing season.
  • Tompkins and Leininger say a retailer needs to be a person the farmer can trust and rely on.

A new year is upon us and farmers are already making plans for the upcoming growing season. It’s time to recommend the right products and the right programs to your customers to ensure a successful yield come fall. One integral piece of ensuring that success is the farmers’ trust in you and your recommendations.

We interviewed farmer Allen Tompkins and retailer Jeremy Leininger about the importance of trust in a working relationship at Tompkins’ farm in Smithboro, Illinois, last summer.

Leininger, who works for Woolsey Brothers Farm Supply in Vandalia, Illinois, put it simply when he said, “The farmer has to trust you, because if they don’t trust you, they might as well not do business with you.”

Now is a good time to reevaluate the relationships you have with your customers. By making sure they trust you, you’re setting them, and yourself, up for success in 2020 and beyond.

Watch the video of Tompkins and Leininger below or on the Corteva Agriscience YouTube channel. You can also learn about the best corn herbicides for your farmers who are planning ahead by visiting the Corn Herbicides Portfolio on Corteva.us.

Suggested TweetA retailer needs to be someone a farmer can trust. This video shows how a good relationship between farmer and retailer leads to success: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rojlc0hxywI.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

3 things to know about nitrogen hibernation

Those who apply nitrogen fertilizer in the fall generally understand that the nitrification process (a.k.a. the process that contributes to nitrogen loss), is chemically halted when the weather gets cold enough and then begins again as temperatures rise.

However, gaining a deeper knowledge of what happens to fall-applied nitrogen over the winter and into spring can make you better prepared to make the best nitrogen management recommendations for your customers year-round.

With that in mind, here are a few key takeaways to understand about fall-applied nitrogen as it hibernates over the winter:

  • 50 degrees F is a notable temperature benchmark
    • The nitrification process is put in motion by a bacteria called Nitrosomonas. It causes the conversion of nitrogen to a nitrate form that can be easily lost. Nitrosomonas bacteria is very active when it is warm, it decreases activity significantly at 50 degrees F and nearly halts under 40 degrees F.
    • For fall nitrogen application, temperatures can hover anywhere above, at, or below this Nitrosomonas activity threshold. Ideal application occurs at 50 degrees F and below to minimize the amount of potential nitrogen lost.
  • Moisture + warmth = more loss potential
    • Warm weather makes Nitrosomonas more active in converting nitrogen to a form vulnerable to loss, but moisture from rain or snowmelt occurring at the same time leads to a higher potential for that nitrogen to be lost via leaching.
  • Beware of the transitional weather danger zone
    • Fall-applied nitrogen must endure two transitional weather periods, which nitrogen is particularly vulnerable to loss given the points above.
    • We know that spring can be unstable and unpredictable, often with large shifts in temperatures and rain amounts.
    • Recent years also show us that fall can be equally unpredictable. Unexpected heavy rain, extended periods of warm weather and delayed harvest can impact when (and if) fall nitrogen can be applied and especially impact how vulnerable it is to loss — well before crops are ready to use it.

Fall-applied nitrogen is a fantastic way to prepare fields for the coming year and can help alleviate some of the workload in spring. But, science shows us that nitrogen is vulnerable to loss from the moment it is applied. To get the benefits of fall-applied nitrogen but ensure it’s there for your crops come spring, it’s best to protect it with a proven nitrogen stabilizer, like N‑Serve®.

N‑Serve protects nitrogen from leaching and denitrification, so it’s guarded during the warm and wet transitional weather periods. N‑Serve also extends nitrogen’s availability in the soil so that it’s there in the spring when your crops need it during critical growth periods.

To learn how N‑Serve with anhydrous ammonia can impact you and your customers’ bottom line, use our Profit Calculator.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

Control weeds in the fall to avoid headaches in the spring

When we’re young, we’re taught to not put off until tomorrow what we can do today. That adage applies to a lot of the work on a farm, including weed control. Once harvest ends, it’s a good idea to work with your customers on a fall herbicide application for their spring soybean fields to make everyone’s life a little easier for next year’s growing season.

Tough weeds like marestail, chickweed and dandelions actively grow and germinate throughout the fall. If left to overwinter in soybean fields, they can become even tougher in the spring. By taking action against those weeds now, while they’re still small, your customers can eliminate the need for, or increase the effectiveness of, a spring burndown application.

You’ll want customers to keep a few key points in mind when performing fall herbicide applications:

    • Do not apply to frozen ground.
    • Apply when air temperatures are still relatively warm, about 40 F to 60 F.
    • Apply to weeds that are actively growing.
    • Perform tillage beforehand on particularly weedy fields (if your customers use tillage, of course).

A good fall solution from Corteva Agriscience is Sonic® herbicide. Although Sonic is widely used as a spring preemergence herbicide, it’s very beneficial for fall weed control.

While your customers’ combines have been put away, that doesn’t mean the season is over. By taking out weeds now, their soybeans will have less competition for resources in spring and summer. Doing that work today paves the way for greater yield tomorrow.

To learn more about how Sonic can keep your customers’ soybean fields clean, contact your Corteva Agriscience territory manager or visit corteva.us.

A fall herbicide application of Sonic® herbicide can pave the way for a smoother spring.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Sharpen your location skills to help farmers plan herbicide trait placement

Real estate professionals say the keys to success are location, location, location. This can apply to herbicide trait technologies as well. Knowing what crops and plants are nearby can make a world of difference to farmers. Retailers can help their customers place herbicide-trait technologies where they’ll have the most opportunity to deliver maximum returns.

“Farmers need to consider field placement,” says Dan Puck, Enlist field specialist. “They should pick locations that allow them to get the maximum benefits from the herbicide traits in the varieties they plant. In most cases, this involves planting these traits in fields where they can use herbicides that provide the best control of problem weeds.”

Puck suggests placing Enlist E3 soybeans in fields that have resistant or tough-to-control weeds. The ability to apply Enlist One® and Enlist Duo® herbicides on top of these varieties will help handle these difficult weeds.

“Using the Enlist trait in areas near compatible crops helps ensure a farmer is able to use the best herbicide for the job,” Puck says. “Crops such as non-Enlist soybeans, corn, wheat, alfalfa and peanuts are compatible with Enlist herbicides.”

Compatible crops are those that are not listed as susceptible crops on Enlist herbicide labels. Puck emphasizes there are no wind direction restrictions when spraying near these compatible crops.

“No field separation is required,” he says. “You can apply right up next to any of these crops.”

Retailers can help farmers set up their weed control programs.

“Retailers and their customers should discuss each field to come up with weed control solutions,” Puck says. “The first step is to identify the weeds that are causing problems. Then pick a trait package that allows the use of herbicides effective against those weeds. Finally, take a holistic approach to put together a program that controls those weeds from preplanting through harvest.”

Using multiple herbicide modes of action is the best tactic for immediate control of weeds as well as limiting the development of higher populations of resistant and hard-to-control weeds. Take a prescriptive approach to weed control based on weed spectrum and pressure.

Discuss your customers’ needs and help them find the solutions that offer the best opportunity for weed control success.

To learn more about the Enlist weed control system, visit Enlist.com or use the Enlist Ahead resource. Also check out the YouTube channel or Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

Farmers will gain if retailers help them plan where to place herbicide-trait technologies to get the maximum benefits.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Corteva.

A clean start leads to a strong harvest

As summer winds down and harvest approaches, there’s almost no better sight than a clean field. Smithboro, Illinois, farmer Allen Tompkins has been enjoying that sight all season, thanks to his weed control program for corn.

Tompkins uses 1 pint of SureStart® II herbicide and 1½ quarts of Resicore® herbicide as the main ingredients to keep his corn fields weed-free. It’s a tailored program Tompkins has used for the last five years on the advice of his retailer Jeremy Leininger of Woolsey Brothers Farm Supply in Vandalia, Illinois.

“We did the Resicore and SureStart program about five or six days after planting, and I can’t tell you if I’ve seen a weed out there,” Tompkins explains.

He says the strength and flexibility of this herbicide program kept weeds under control, even as the weather was out of control.

Tompkins says there was enough constant rain to keep him out of fields from the end of October 2018 until May 2019. Excessive moisture early in the season can make weed control more difficult. Despite planting late, Tompkins noticed clean fields throughout the season because of his powerful weed control program. From his experience, the cleaner the field, the easier the harvest.

“If you get a super weedy field, there are always weeds that are getting wrapped up in your machinery,” he says. “You have to get out, dig everything out, and it’s just a really big pain to harvest. Clean fields just make everything go smoother. Not only are they aesthetically pleasing, but they’re a lot more pleasing when you’re in the seat of the combine.”

To learn how SureStart II can help keep your customers’ fields clean for an easier harvest, visit SureStartII.com.

Illinois farmer Allen Tompkins uses SureStart® II herbicide and Resicore® herbicide to keep his corn fields clean. This photo was taken in July 2019.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.