Tag Archives: Industry News

Poll results: See how retailers are answering 2017 poll questions

Rain at planting, spraying delays and replanting: The first half of 2017 has been a lesson in perseverance. In the last three Inputs & Insights issues, readers have shared their opinions on a broad range of crop protection topics, including selling herbicides, helping customers at planting and nitrogen stabilizer benefits. Here is a look at the results from recent poll questions.

In April, readers shared the key benefits they discuss most with their customers when recommending a nitrogen stabilizer. ”Reduced nitrogen loss” and “Extended nitrogen availability during crop’s growth stages” topped the list followed by “Increased yield”. When it comes to reducing nitrogen loss, Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers work below the soil’s surface to extend nitrogen availability up to eight weeks in soil temperatures above 50 F.

Retailers provide many valuable services to farmers at planting, including planning for the year and answering questions about products. In February, 88 percent of readers said they primarily help customers by developing weed management plans, ensuring field fertility and delivering product. According to one reader, the most valuable service retailers provide to customers is “being there for them when they need you.”

Before helping customers at planting, retailers can face challenges when selling herbicides. In January, the majority of readers said their biggest challenge to selling herbicides is finding the right product to combat herbicide resistance. Readers also reported price and new technology that may not be familiar to customers as notable challenges.

When it comes to battling herbicide-resistant weeds, such as waterhemp, marestail and giant ragweed, Dow AgroSciences recommends using a program approach that starts with preemergence, residual herbicides followed by timely postemergence applications. This includes using Resicore® and SureStart® II herbicides in corn, Sonic® and Surveil® herbicides in soybeans, and Enlist Duo® herbicide as part of the Enlist weed control system in both corn and soybeans.

We enjoy hearing from you in each issue and invite you to take this month’s poll. For more information about Dow AgroSciences crop protection products, please contact your Dow AgroSciences sales representative or visit dowagro.com.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Instinct II, Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Residual control through canopy

After excessive rain at planting, it’s common for farmers to question whether the herbicide they applied preemergence will deliver enough residual control into the growing season. Especially in seasons with delayed planting and spraying, farmers should apply an additional residual herbicide early postemergence to control weeds through canopy.

In seasons with a lot of rainfall, weeds have a longer germination period than normal and the residual length of early-applied herbicides may be shortened. When the length of residual control is threatened, weeds are given the chance to grow with young corn plants and rob yield because there isn’t shade from corn canopy yet. Farmers must carefully scout cornfields and apply an additional residual herbicide early postemergence to prevent late flushes of waterhemp and giant ragweed from competing with corn later in the season.

The program approach of SureStart® II herbicide applied preemergence followed by Resicore® herbicide early postemergence provides four modes of action to control the toughest weeds in corn, including herbicide-resistant species. Plus, farmers can add atrazine and glyphosate to the program for six different modes of action. Resicore is designed to control emerged weeds with extended residual control to control late weed escapes.

For more information about controlling weeds early postemergence, visit PowerOverWeeds.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

Allow corn to grow stronger by keeping fields clean before canopy.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Residual herbicides strengthen new weed control technologies

As new weed control technologies enter the market, farmers need to avoid repetitive use of the same active ingredient. Using residual herbicides in a program approach helps control tough weeds in multiple ways.

Sonic®, Surveil® and FirstRate® herbicides are approved tank-mix partners with several herbicides labeled for use in new weed control systems, including XtendiMax herbicide and Engenia herbicide, with additional tank-mix options expected in the near future. FirstRate also can be tank-mixed with FeXapan herbicide.

Adding Sonic, Surveil or FirstRate to your customers’ tank mix provides two additional nonglyphosate modes of action and long-lasting residual control of many tough weeds, including waterhemp, marestail, Palmer amaranth and giant ragweed. Help your customers build a strong program approach to improve yield potential and ROI. Here are five tips for cleaner fields:

  1. Incorporate tillage and/or a preplant herbicide burndown program to remove existing weeds.
  2. Use the full rate of a broad-spectrum, preemergence residual herbicide that targets your customers’ worst weeds.
  3. Apply multiple modes of action that have powerful activity on the Amaranthus species — pigweeds, waterhemps, Palmer amaranth and Powell amaranth.
  4. Choose the appropriate postemergence herbicide and be ready to apply sequential applications as needed. Strive for complete weed control to reduce the weed seed bank in the soil.
  5. Rotate crops and/or herbicide modes of action to sustain effective weed control and prevent future resistance.

For more information about how your customers can fight back against tough weeds this season, visit BattleWeeds.com.

Farmers planted more than 83,000,000 acres of soybeans in 2016, and more than 89,000,000 acres of soybeans in 2017. Improve soybean yield with residual herbicides as part of your weed control programs.

®DOW Diamond, FirstRate, Sonic and Surveil are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. XtendiMax is a trademark of Monsanto Technology LLC. Engenia is a trademark of BASF. FeXapan is a trademark of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Sonic and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

6 tips to build a weed management program

Following a program approach to weed control can help farmers control the weeds that challenge crops this year while preserving the effectiveness of herbicide technologies into the future. Retailers can help farmers develop a well-thought-out weed control program that can help them achieve successful weed control, improved yield and higher profits in years to come.

Jonathan Siebert, Ph.D., Dow AgroSciences Enlist field sales leader, offers these six tips that retailers can consider when helping customers with weed control strategies.

  1. Know the field history. “It’s important to reference the past, especially the previous year, when laying out a weed control program,” Siebert says. “If a field harbors marestail or Palmer amaranth, you’ll need to select herbicides that are effective against those species.”
  2. Start with a clean seedbed. “Your goal should be to have no weeds in the field at planting,” Siebert says. “Most fields benefit from a burndown program that can include effective herbicides such as glyphosate and new 2,4-D choline, the ingredients in Enlist Duo herbicide.”
  3. Use herbicides with residual activity. “Adding residual herbicides at burndown, preemergence or both can provide additional modes of action that help control weeds in the current year and preserve the efficacy of our postemergence herbicide technologies,” Siebert says.
  4. Rotate modes of action. “To prevent the development of herbicide resistance, we need to rotate the modes of action available to us,” Siebert says. “Weed control needs to be prescriptive: We must scout fields and, when weeds emerge, hit them with postemergence herbicides, remembering to rotate modes of action.”
  5. Keep the borders of fields clean. Siebert suggests farmers make sure they’re controlling weeds in ditches and turn rows to prevent weed escapes. Weeds in these areas can develop resistance because they’ve avoided exposure to full rates of effective herbicides.
  6. Adopt a zero-tolerance policy. Controlling weeds effectively throughout the growing season is essential to curbing the expansion of herbicide resistance.

“We have to be good stewards,” Siebert emphasizes. “Longevity of our herbicide technologies is key to effective long-term weed control.”

Siebert says growers may need to pull rogue weeds to keep those that escape herbicides from eventually overwhelming technologies. “The best practice is to keep the farm free of weeds,” he says. “A field that’s clean helps protect more of the yield potential of every seed we plant.”

The fate of glyphosate is a lesson agriculture can’t forget. “As glyphosate has become less of a silver bullet, it’s had a negative impact on economics and profitability,” Siebert says. “Abusing and losing weed management tools costs time and money. With tight margins, farmers need to do all they can to maximize yield and profits by keeping weeds from shrinking income.”

Sound weed management plans — with retailers providing assistance to customers as they develop these plans — is vital to boosting farmers’ opportunities for long-term profitability.

“We need to be proactive in our approach to weed control,” Siebert says. “Weed control and resistance management take a long-term commitment just like soil fertility requires a long-term view. We have to look five or 10 years down the road. Successful weed management can help farmers achieve long-term productivity.”

tractor spraying herbicide

Rotating herbicide modes of action can help growers achieve better weed control with the current crop while also helping sustain effective herbicide technologies for use in coming years.

®™Enlist and Enlist Duo are trademarks of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Enlist Duo herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Protect your crop with nitrogen maximizers

Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers can increase the amount of time nitrogen is in the ammonium form and increase your revenue too. The active ingredient in Instinct and N-Serve inhibits the nitrification process by inhibiting Nitrosomonas bacteria to keep nitrogen in the ammonium form longer for crops to use, increasing nitrogen retention by 28 percent.1

Corn can take up and use nitrogen when in the nitrate form, but the nitrate form is susceptible to loss through leaching and denitrification. Instinct and N-Serve inhibit nitrification — the conversion of ammonium to nitrates — keeping nitrogen in the ammonium form longer, leading to more readily available nitrogen. The delay in the nitrification process allows for better root development in the plants during critical growth stages and for more efficient nitrogen uptake.

Regardless of fertilizer type, or whether farmers apply nitrogen early or split-apply with sidedress applications, using a proven product to protect your customers’ nitrogen investment is critical for crop growth and yield.

Instinct is used with UAN, urea and liquid manure, while N-Serve is used with anhydrous ammonia in spring, fall and sidedress applications.

Instinct and N-Serve work below the soil’s surface to extend nitrogen availability up to eight weeks in soil temperatures above 50 F for maximum crop growth and profit. 

In addition to extending nitrogen availability, the active ingredient in Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers supports environmental stewardship efforts by reducing leaching into groundwater by 16 percent and decreasing greenhouse gases up to 51 percent.1    

For more information about protecting your customers’ nitrogen, visit NitrogenMaximizers.com or contact your Dow AgroSciences sales rep.

1Wolt, J. D. 2004. A meta-evaluation of nitrapyrin agronomic and environmental effectiveness with emphasis on corn production in the midwestern USA. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst. 69: 23–41. doi:10.1023/B:FRES.0000025287.52565.

Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers inhibit nitrification — the conversion of ammonium to nitrates — keeping nitrogen in the ammonium form longer, leading to more readily available nitrogen for crops to use.

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

 

Fight back against glyphosate-resistant weeds

Soybean farmers are no strangers to resistant weeds as 15 states in the United States have reported glyphosate-resistant weeds in the past 20 years.1 One of the best ways to help your customers get a handle on glyphosate-resistant weeds is to start with a clean field in the spring. In many cases, this means using tillage to have a clean seedbed and/or using a burndown herbicide before coming back with a soil-applied, residual herbicide.

“The only way to really claim back this territory from resistant weeds is to have a weed-free field going into harvest,” says Dave Ruen, field scientist, Dow AgroSciences.

Ruen adds that it is important to use proper herbicide rates. In many cases, this will be near or at the full use rate on the label. After applying a preemergence herbicide, scout fields for surviving weeds so you can select a proper postemergence herbicide with multiple modes of action that will be effective against glyphosate-resistant weeds.

As farmers contend with 16 glyphosate-resistant weed species,2 it’s important to recommend preemergence, residual herbicides with multiple modes of action to manage future resistance. Sonic® herbicide provides two nonglyphosate modes of action to control your customers’ worst broadleaf weeds.

To learn more about how your customers can battle herbicide-resistant weeds this spring, visit OperationCleanFields.com.

Palmer amaranth

Palmer amaranth continues to spread from the South to the upper Midwest, making it critical for soybean farmers to use preemergence, residual herbicides to control this glyphosate-resistant weed early.

1Heap, I. 2017. The International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds. www.weedscience.org
2Take action on weeds. 2017. How weeds become resistant. http://takeactiononweeds.com/knowing-your-weeds/resistance/

®Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Saving pennies can cost dollars

Growers may be asking you to provide cheaper inputs this year, but you could be doing them a favor by suggesting they instead use the best products and practices for their operations.

Return on investment is key, especially with low commodity prices. A retailer who helps customers avoid knee-jerk decisions to pinch pennies on valuable inputs can give those customers the opportunity for higher yield and healthier profits.

“Remind growers to use products that pay for themselves in the form of more bushels per acre,” says Chris Byus, Enlist herbicides product manager for Dow AgroSciences. “Discuss crop protection needs as early as possible, emphasizing that return on investment for these technologies is high.”

Weeds can take a huge bite out of yield — and income — for your customers. The best way to protect their profit potential is with a sound weed management plan. That includes an effective early season residual product followed by postemergence herbicides offering different modes of action. Growers can use strong residuals such as Resicore® herbicide and SureStart® II herbicide for corn and Sonic® herbicide or Surveil® herbicide for soybeans.

Residuals followed by postemergence herbicides offering different modes of action not only provide a better opportunity for profit in 2017 but also slow the development of herbicide-resistant weeds.

“You really can’t afford to skimp even one year on crop protection,” Byus notes. “You may end up paying for years to come. The weed seedbank will grow, and those weeds can continue to emerge year after year.”

For instance, Palmer amaranth can become entrenched in just one summer. A single plant can produce half a million seeds — seeds your growers may struggle with for a decade or more.

“Multiple modes of action offer the best weed control strategy,” Byus notes. “The Enlist weed control system is designed to allow growers to adopt a program approach featuring multiple modes of action. It also allows growers to apply three modes of action postemergence.”

Growers can apply Enlist Duo® herbicide, a combination of new 2,4-D choline and glyphosate, to Enlist crops. Enlist corn also is tolerant to FOP herbicides, while Enlist soybeans and cotton are also tolerant to glufosinate.

“You want growers to know you’re taking care of them,” Byus says. “By helping them find cost-effective weed control tools, you’re building up their confidence in your knowledge. It pays to learn about new technologies such as the Enlist system to help growers find the solutions that help them make more money.”

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow. The Enlist weed control system is owned and developed by Dow AgroSciences LLC. Enlist Duo herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Resicore, Sonic, SureStart II and Surveil are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2017 Dow AgroSciences LLC