Tag Archives: Industry News

A clean spring starts with a preemergence herbicide

As your customers evaluate this season’s yield and adjust their weed control plans for next season, reinforce the value of a preemergence herbicide with them for a clean start. By relying only on postemergence applications, waterhemp, marestail and other common weeds can start robbing corn and soybean yield right after planting.

Spring is a vulnerable time for crops as they require a strong start to thrive for the rest of the season. In an April poll on OperationCleanFields.com, most retailers — 58 percent — selected waterhemp as their customers’ most challenging weed followed by marestail at 23 percent.

Marestail is generally considered the most difficult weed to control if it can overwinter into the spring. When this happens, marestail grows rapidly as temperatures warm, robbing soil of two critical inputs: moisture and nitrogen. Since marestail can germinate throughout the entire year, it’s important for retailers and farmers to scout for it year-round and identify it early in the rosette stage for effective control.

The photos below were taken in McLean, Nebraska, on July 9, 2018. McLean is in the Northeast part of the state and where marestail is one of the biggest weed challenges. The fields shown received spring applications of Sonic® herbicide in soybeans and Resicore® herbicide in corn to allow the crops to grow with less weed competition.

“To reduce the spread of resistant weed populations, such as marestail and waterhemp, farmers should plan their herbicide control and crop rotation for more than a single year at a time,” says Dave Roome, customer technical specialist, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont. “The most important tip for farmers fighting these weeds in their corn or soybean fields is to act early by starting with a preemergence herbicide to keep weeds small and easier to control.”

Talk with your Corteva Agriscience territory manager about how you can help your customers get a jump on weeds in corn and soybean fields next spring. For more information about Resicore and Sonic, visit PowerOverWeeds.com and BattleWeeds.com, respectively.

Nebraska soybean field protected by Sonic herbicide.

A Nebraska soybean field is protected by a preemergence application of Sonic® herbicide.

Nebraska cornfield protected by Resicore herbicide

Resicore® herbicide gave this Nebraska cornfield a powerful start against yield-robbing weeds, such as marestail and waterhemp.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Resicore and Sonic are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore is not registered for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions.

Three steps to identify a proven nitrogen stabilizer

Nitrogen stabilizers are one option to protect nitrogen; however, the market is saturated with products that claim to protect nitrogen. With fall purchasing decisions around the corner, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, has identified key criteria to help farmers select a proven nitrogen stabilizer that is right for them.

Weeding through the myriad of stabilizer products can be tricky, and timely factors like commodity prices, trade negotiations and nutrient management regulations make finding the best option even more important. Corteva Agriscience recommends that farmers use three criteria in determining the right nitrogen stabilizer to use:

  1. Leverage University-supported research
    Use stabilizers that have been rigorously tested and proven by universities. Farmers should ask their retailers to share academic research that supports the claims that are being touted.
  2. Check labeling to ensure it meets EPA registration guidelines
    Use stabilizers that also follow EPA registration guidelines. These guidelines require robust documentation and research to support claims that relate to the effectiveness of a nitrogen stabilizer product.
  3. Prioritize value
    The current economics of farming may not be as rewarding as a few years ago, so every penny matters. Stabilizers can be viewed as an insurance policy to protect crop yield and preserve a farmer’s investments. Whether you’re concerned about nitrogen being a yield-limiting factor or concerned about nitrogen loss impacting water quality, nitrogen should always be protected.

Two options that meet this criteria set are Instinct® and N-Serve® nitrogen stabilizers. Instinct and N-Serve maximize nitrogen by extending its availability for up to eight weeks, during critical growth stages for corn and wheat, helping crops deliver the maximum yield at harvest. To learn more, visit MaxInMaxOut.com, or contact your local Corteva Agriscience territory manager.

®™Trademark of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences

Encourage maximum yield with a fine eye for nitrogen deficiency

Realizing maximum yield in the fall begins with a holistic approach to nutrient management. This includes making sure phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) levels are adequate to support growth throughout the entire season and knowing how to visually identify those levels in the corn crop.

Applied nitrogen is particularly vulnerable to leaching, meaning the loss of nitrates into the groundwater, and denitrification, the escape of greenhouse gases into the environment. If a plant can’t absorb enough nitrogen through the soil, it will cannibalize its own internal sources of nitrogen — draining strength from its stalk and leaves. When that happens, weakened cornstalks, stalk rot and significantly reduced yield can result.

Three signs of nitrogen deficiency in corn to look for are:

  • Firing of leaves (yellowing begins at the leaf tip and progresses along the midrib)
  • Pale green plants
  • Stunted growth and spindly stalks

Fields at the highest risk of nitrogen loss include fall- and preplant-applied nitrogen fields, those composed of sandy soils and fields with poor drainage.

Take time now to scout fields, evaluate your customers’ nutrient management programs and consider changes to maximize efficient nitrogen by protecting applications with a nitrogen stabilizer such as Instinct® or N-Serve®. Instinct and N-Serve help ensure that applied nitrogen is still available in the root zone for plant uptake, especially if heavy rains occurred after nitrogen was applied.

Corn displaying signs of nitrogen deficiency

®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Corteva Agriscience

Weed control Q&A

Operation: Clean Fields is a retailer-exclusive website designed to help retailers learn more about soybean topics that matter to them and their customers. Throughout the year, retailers have sent in their own questions about soybean herbicides and field experts have answered several online.

Michigan retailer Chad submitted the following question to Operation: Clean Fields and will receive a $250 gift card as a reward. Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, market development specialist Kent Bennis has the answer.

Q: When layering a preemergence program on soybeans, what is the best method to follow it with postemergence?

A: Thank you for your question, Chad. DuPont EverpreX herbicide is an excellent postemergence herbicide to follow a layered preemergence program. We recommend applying EverpreX at the second to third trifoliate stage in 15-inch or narrower soybean rows. For 30-inch rows, we recommend targeting the fourth to fifth trifoliate stage for residual applications of EverpreX. This application timing allows EverpreX to be absorbed into the soil earlier, which opens the window for additional post applications.

Visit here for more information about EverpreX.

Read more Q&A’s and send in your questions for a chance to receive a $250 gift card by visiting OperationCleanFields.com.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or respective owners. DuPont EverpreX herbicide is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions.

Don’t get trapped by a temperature inversion

A thin layer of fog sits atop a young crop in the early morning hours. It has a peaceful appearance, but these conditions may provoke horizontal movement of surface-level air, causing any trapped particles — such as pesticides — to move into neighboring fields.

What you see may be a temperature inversion. A layer of warm air covers a layer of cooler air and acts like a lid, preventing the cooler air from rising and mixing with the upper atmosphere.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), temperature inversions commonly form when the air near the ground cools at night. Calm winds, clear skies and long nights increase the likelihood of a temperature inversion occurring.

Gases trapped near the surface can’t mix with the warmer air above and dissipate naturally, so they hover near the ground and often drift sideways. Pesticides hanging in this layer of air can move into neighboring fields, lawns and gardens with unintended consequences.

“We want a light wind — 3 to 10 miles per hour — when making a herbicide application,” says Haley Nabors, Enlist field specialist. Within a temperature inversion, applied products can move great distances. “Furthermore, the direction the trapped air will move is unpredictable.”

Warn growers about temperature inversions
You can remind customers or anyone applying crop protection products to watch for common conditions that create temperature inversions. If these conditions occur, avoid applying any herbicides until the environment is favorable for a successful, on-target application.

Temperature inversions are most likely to occur when wind speeds are less than 3 mph and/or if the temperature is within five degrees of the nighttime low. That’s why spraying in wind conditions of zero to 3 mph is never recommended.

Technology helps identify conditions
All applicators should plan to check local weather conditions before making any herbicide application.

“If you identify a temperature inversion, do not make an application,” Nabors says. “The spray particles may never hit the intended surface, which makes the application less effective for your crop. If it doesn’t reach the weeds, you’re wasting your herbicide dollars.”

In addition, you run the risk of damaging susceptible plants in nearby fields, lawns and gardens.

Nabors urges you to check conditions before every application and even during applications. Weather apps for smartphones and tablets can be useful tools to monitor changing weather throughout a herbicide application. Always monitor conditions while you are in the field. In addition to weather apps or websites, an inexpensive windsock shows wind direction. An anemometer provides wind speed. A quick check of the temperature also is a good idea.

If you prefer a visual sign, releasing smoke or powder can indicate particle movement. The smoke or powder should drift gently with the wind. If it gathers in a stationary, suspended cloud, that indicates a temperature inversion, which may cause an application to move far and wide.

“With Enlist herbicides, we recommend a minimum wind speed of 3 mph,” Nabors says. “This allows some stirring in the atmosphere to dissipate any potential inversion layer.”

Remember, a complete lack of wind is a warning. Do not apply herbicides. Wait until later in the day and check again for a more favorable application environment.

Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (“DuPont”) or affiliated companies of Dow or DuPont. Enlist herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist herbicides are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use in Enlist crops. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences LLC

Pre-sidedress soil testing can combat spring weather yield impacts

Spring 2018 has been tough for corn growers. The Corn Belt specifically experienced unusually cold weather throughout April while other parts of the country saw late-spring snow, excessive precipitation and, oddly in some areas, drought. These atypical weather events delayed the majority of corn planting, prompting many farmers to ask: How will this affect my yield?

Historical data indicates that abnormally cold Aprils lead to below-average yield. While such weather and yield impacts are beyond farmer control, there are a few steps farmers can take to help combat potential negative effects.

  • A pre-sidedress soil nitrate test is a great option for farmers to determine the nitrate nitrogen available in the soil after the spring precipitation period and before the period of major nitrogen demand by corn. This test will show how soil was impacted by spring weather events and the late planting start and will inform more accurate sidedress nitrogen recommendations.
  • Best practices are to sample corn when it is 6 to 12 inches tall, or in late May to early June. Farmers should sample areas that are similar and 10 to 20 acres in size. This test works best if farmers avoid previous fertilizer application bands, including starter and anhydrous ammonia bands. Farmers should also take 15 to 20 cores per sample.
  • Tactful sidedress planning, along with use of a nitrogen stabilizer, such as Instinct® or N‑Serve®, can be a great option for farmers looking to optimize their yield despite negative spring weather impacts. This allows farmers to apply more nitrogen for peak growth at critical nutrient uptake stages and helps protect applied nitrogen by keeping it in the root zone longer where and when corn needs it most.

For additional details on nitrogen stabilizers, such as Instinct and N-Serve, visit MaxInMaxOut.com or contact your local Dow AgroSciences sales representative.

®™Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (“DuPont”) or affiliated companies of Dow or DuPont. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences LLC

The 4Rs: Help customers get the most out of their fertilizer application and maintenance

With commodity prices at a current low, it’s now more important than ever for your customers to ensure they’re getting the most out of their inputs. One solution? Implementing the 4R Nutrient Stewardship practices for fertilizer application and maintenance.

The 4Rs of nutrient stewardship consist of a guiding framework that centers upon applying the right source of nutrient, at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place. From this framework, your customers can track and achieve their cropping goals, such as increased production, profitability, environmental protection and sustainability.

Regardless of the market health, each growing season is still laden with uncertainty and risk regarding temperatures and precipitation patterns. However, by applying the 4R practices and using the right nitrogen stabilizer, your customers can extend nitrogen availability in the soil, maximize the efficiency of their nutrient management and protect their inputs from leaching and denitrification, even with fluctuating commodity prices and during the most ambiguous environmental conditions.

By using nitrogen stabilizers like Instinct® and N-Serve®, your customers are able to keep nitrogen in the right place up to eight weeks longer and, ultimately, maximize their growth to benefit their nutrient management plan.

For more information on the 4Rs, visit www.nutrientstewardship.com/4rs. For additional details on nitrogen stabilizers like Instinct and N-Serve, visit MaxInMaxOut.com, or contact your local Corteva Agriscience sales representative.

®™ Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (“DuPont”) or affiliated companies of Dow or DuPont. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. ©2018 Dow AgroSciences LLC