Tag Archives: Industry News

Being the person your customers can trust

Three Key Takeaways from This Article:

  • January is a good time to reevaluate your relationships with your customers. How can you be a good partner for growers heading into a new season?
  • Illinois farmer Allen Tompkins and his retailer Troy Leininger discuss how important it is for a farmer and retailer to have a trusted working relationship for a successful growing season.
  • Tompkins and Leininger say a retailer needs to be a person the farmer can trust and rely on.

A new year is upon us and farmers are already making plans for the upcoming growing season. It’s time to recommend the right products and the right programs to your customers to ensure a successful yield come fall. One integral piece of ensuring that success is the farmers’ trust in you and your recommendations.

We interviewed farmer Allen Tompkins and retailer Jeremy Leininger about the importance of trust in a working relationship at Tompkins’ farm in Smithboro, Illinois, last summer.

Leininger, who works for Woolsey Brothers Farm Supply in Vandalia, Illinois, put it simply when he said, “The farmer has to trust you, because if they don’t trust you, they might as well not do business with you.”

Now is a good time to reevaluate the relationships you have with your customers. By making sure they trust you, you’re setting them, and yourself, up for success in 2020 and beyond.

Watch the video of Tompkins and Leininger below or on the Corteva Agriscience YouTube channel. You can also learn about the best corn herbicides for your farmers who are planning ahead by visiting the Corn Herbicides Portfolio on Corteva.us.

Suggested TweetA retailer needs to be someone a farmer can trust. This video shows how a good relationship between farmer and retailer leads to success: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rojlc0hxywI.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

3 things to know about nitrogen hibernation

Those who apply nitrogen fertilizer in the fall generally understand that the nitrification process (a.k.a. the process that contributes to nitrogen loss), is chemically halted when the weather gets cold enough and then begins again as temperatures rise.

However, gaining a deeper knowledge of what happens to fall-applied nitrogen over the winter and into spring can make you better prepared to make the best nitrogen management recommendations for your customers year-round.

With that in mind, here are a few key takeaways to understand about fall-applied nitrogen as it hibernates over the winter:

  • 50 degrees F is a notable temperature benchmark
    • The nitrification process is put in motion by a bacteria called Nitrosomonas. It causes the conversion of nitrogen to a nitrate form that can be easily lost. Nitrosomonas bacteria is very active when it is warm, it decreases activity significantly at 50 degrees F and nearly halts under 40 degrees F.
    • For fall nitrogen application, temperatures can hover anywhere above, at, or below this Nitrosomonas activity threshold. Ideal application occurs at 50 degrees F and below to minimize the amount of potential nitrogen lost.
  • Moisture + warmth = more loss potential
    • Warm weather makes Nitrosomonas more active in converting nitrogen to a form vulnerable to loss, but moisture from rain or snowmelt occurring at the same time leads to a higher potential for that nitrogen to be lost via leaching.
  • Beware of the transitional weather danger zone
    • Fall-applied nitrogen must endure two transitional weather periods, which nitrogen is particularly vulnerable to loss given the points above.
    • We know that spring can be unstable and unpredictable, often with large shifts in temperatures and rain amounts.
    • Recent years also show us that fall can be equally unpredictable. Unexpected heavy rain, extended periods of warm weather and delayed harvest can impact when (and if) fall nitrogen can be applied and especially impact how vulnerable it is to loss — well before crops are ready to use it.

Fall-applied nitrogen is a fantastic way to prepare fields for the coming year and can help alleviate some of the workload in spring. But, science shows us that nitrogen is vulnerable to loss from the moment it is applied. To get the benefits of fall-applied nitrogen but ensure it’s there for your crops come spring, it’s best to protect it with a proven nitrogen stabilizer, like N‑Serve®.

N‑Serve protects nitrogen from leaching and denitrification, so it’s guarded during the warm and wet transitional weather periods. N‑Serve also extends nitrogen’s availability in the soil so that it’s there in the spring when your crops need it during critical growth periods.

To learn how N‑Serve with anhydrous ammonia can impact you and your customers’ bottom line, use our Profit Calculator.

®™Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2020 Corteva.

Control weeds in the fall to avoid headaches in the spring

When we’re young, we’re taught to not put off until tomorrow what we can do today. That adage applies to a lot of the work on a farm, including weed control. Once harvest ends, it’s a good idea to work with your customers on a fall herbicide application for their spring soybean fields to make everyone’s life a little easier for next year’s growing season.

Tough weeds like marestail, chickweed and dandelions actively grow and germinate throughout the fall. If left to overwinter in soybean fields, they can become even tougher in the spring. By taking action against those weeds now, while they’re still small, your customers can eliminate the need for, or increase the effectiveness of, a spring burndown application.

You’ll want customers to keep a few key points in mind when performing fall herbicide applications:

    • Do not apply to frozen ground.
    • Apply when air temperatures are still relatively warm, about 40 F to 60 F.
    • Apply to weeds that are actively growing.
    • Perform tillage beforehand on particularly weedy fields (if your customers use tillage, of course).

A good fall solution from Corteva Agriscience is Sonic® herbicide. Although Sonic is widely used as a spring preemergence herbicide, it’s very beneficial for fall weed control.

While your customers’ combines have been put away, that doesn’t mean the season is over. By taking out weeds now, their soybeans will have less competition for resources in spring and summer. Doing that work today paves the way for greater yield tomorrow.

To learn more about how Sonic can keep your customers’ soybean fields clean, contact your Corteva Agriscience territory manager or visit corteva.us.

A fall herbicide application of Sonic® herbicide can pave the way for a smoother spring.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Sharpen your location skills to help farmers plan herbicide trait placement

Real estate professionals say the keys to success are location, location, location. This can apply to herbicide trait technologies as well. Knowing what crops and plants are nearby can make a world of difference to farmers. Retailers can help their customers place herbicide-trait technologies where they’ll have the most opportunity to deliver maximum returns.

“Farmers need to consider field placement,” says Dan Puck, Enlist field specialist. “They should pick locations that allow them to get the maximum benefits from the herbicide traits in the varieties they plant. In most cases, this involves planting these traits in fields where they can use herbicides that provide the best control of problem weeds.”

Puck suggests placing Enlist E3 soybeans in fields that have resistant or tough-to-control weeds. The ability to apply Enlist One® and Enlist Duo® herbicides on top of these varieties will help handle these difficult weeds.

“Using the Enlist trait in areas near compatible crops helps ensure a farmer is able to use the best herbicide for the job,” Puck says. “Crops such as non-Enlist soybeans, corn, wheat, alfalfa and peanuts are compatible with Enlist herbicides.”

Compatible crops are those that are not listed as susceptible crops on Enlist herbicide labels. Puck emphasizes there are no wind direction restrictions when spraying near these compatible crops.

“No field separation is required,” he says. “You can apply right up next to any of these crops.”

Retailers can help farmers set up their weed control programs.

“Retailers and their customers should discuss each field to come up with weed control solutions,” Puck says. “The first step is to identify the weeds that are causing problems. Then pick a trait package that allows the use of herbicides effective against those weeds. Finally, take a holistic approach to put together a program that controls those weeds from preplanting through harvest.”

Using multiple herbicide modes of action is the best tactic for immediate control of weeds as well as limiting the development of higher populations of resistant and hard-to-control weeds. Take a prescriptive approach to weed control based on weed spectrum and pressure.

Discuss your customers’ needs and help them find the solutions that offer the best opportunity for weed control success.

To learn more about the Enlist weed control system, visit Enlist.com or use the Enlist Ahead resource. Also check out the YouTube channel or Twitter at @EnlistOnline.

Farmers will gain if retailers help them plan where to place herbicide-trait technologies to get the maximum benefits.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Enlist Duo and Enlist One herbicides are not registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your area. Enlist Duo and Enlist One are the only 2,4-D products authorized for use with Enlist crops. Consult Enlist herbicide labels for weed species controlled. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Corteva.

A clean start leads to a strong harvest

As summer winds down and harvest approaches, there’s almost no better sight than a clean field. Smithboro, Illinois, farmer Allen Tompkins has been enjoying that sight all season, thanks to his weed control program for corn.

Tompkins uses 1 pint of SureStart® II herbicide and 1½ quarts of Resicore® herbicide as the main ingredients to keep his corn fields weed-free. It’s a tailored program Tompkins has used for the last five years on the advice of his retailer Jeremy Leininger of Woolsey Brothers Farm Supply in Vandalia, Illinois.

“We did the Resicore and SureStart program about five or six days after planting, and I can’t tell you if I’ve seen a weed out there,” Tompkins explains.

He says the strength and flexibility of this herbicide program kept weeds under control, even as the weather was out of control.

Tompkins says there was enough constant rain to keep him out of fields from the end of October 2018 until May 2019. Excessive moisture early in the season can make weed control more difficult. Despite planting late, Tompkins noticed clean fields throughout the season because of his powerful weed control program. From his experience, the cleaner the field, the easier the harvest.

“If you get a super weedy field, there are always weeds that are getting wrapped up in your machinery,” he says. “You have to get out, dig everything out, and it’s just a really big pain to harvest. Clean fields just make everything go smoother. Not only are they aesthetically pleasing, but they’re a lot more pleasing when you’re in the seat of the combine.”

To learn how SureStart II can help keep your customers’ fields clean for an easier harvest, visit SureStartII.com.

Illinois farmer Allen Tompkins uses SureStart® II herbicide and Resicore® herbicide to keep his corn fields clean. This photo was taken in July 2019.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Resicore and SureStart II are not registered for sale or use in all states. Resicore and SureStart II are not available for sale, distribution or use in Nassau and Suffolk counties in the state of New York. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

During a rushed harvest, don’t skip these nitrogen steps

Harvest will likely be rushed this year as a result of the planting delays this spring. This means a shorter window in which to gather crops and prepare fields for next year. With this time crunch, your customers may overlook or forget some basic best practices for fall operations. In the case of nitrogen application, these best practices can make the difference between a boosted 2020 yield and loss of this valuable input.

With that in mind, if soil conditions and weather allow for fall applications on your customers’ fields, now is a good time to review best practices to maximize nitrogen-related success.

Fall application best practices

When it comes to fall application, there are several do’s and don’ts to consider.

  • Do’s
    • Apply only anhydrous ammonia or manure fertilizer in fall.
    • Apply after Oct. 1, but only if temperatures are cool enough.
    • Apply to soil that is 50 F 4 inches below the surface. You want soil that is 50 F, or lower, but not freezing.
    • For clay soils, apply half the nitrogen in fall and half in spring.
  • Don’ts
    • Don’t apply if it’s raining.
    • Don’t apply to sandy soils or in fields prone to spring flooding.
    • Don’t apply if the ground is frozen; the nutrients won’t absorb.

Most of all, be sure to apply a nitrogen stabilizer
Nitrogen has a long time to wait between fall application and spring crop uptake, so you’ll want to protect it with a nitrogen stabilizer to ensure it’s still in the soil come spring. A nitrogen stabilizer, such as N-Serve® for anhydrous ammonia and Instinct® for liquid manure, protects fall-applied nitrogen from leaching and denitrification in warming spring soils. This is important because it keeps nitrogen in the root zone during critical crop growth periods and doesn’t leave your farmers’ costly investment vulnerable to loss.

In all, adhering to these best practices can help postharvest nitrogen application be a success and can help maximize 2020 yield goals.

Visit NitrogenMaximizers.com to learn more about protecting farmers’ nutrient investments this fall. While there, you can also use the Profit Calculator to see how N-Serve and Instinct can impact your bottom line come harvest.

If the weather and soil are right for it, a fall nitrogen application is a good idea.

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Instinct is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Do not fall-apply anhydrous ammonia south of Highway 16 in the state of Illinois. Always read and follow label directions. © 2019 Corteva.

Q&A: Understanding residual control with preemergence herbicides

With soybean fields planted, albeit late in a lot of cases, many farmers and retailers may be wondering how long the preemergence herbicides they applied will hold against tough weeds. It’s an important factor to consider when planning for any potential postemergence herbicide     applications.

Recently, a soybean retailer submitted a timely question via Operation: Clean Fields around expected residual control of a top preemergence herbicide. Chad, a retailer in Minnesota, asked the question, and Jeff Moon, market development specialist with Corteva Agriscience, answered.

Q: When applied as a preemergence, how long of a residual can I expect using Sonic® herbicide?

A: Sonic herbicide has a labeled application rate of 4 to 7 ounces per acre. The length of residual will depend greatly on where your application falls within that rate spectrum. If you apply 4 ounces per acre, you can expect residual control to last between four and six weeks. From there, as a general rule of thumb, you can expect an additional seven to 10 days of control for every ounce per acre that the application rate increases. So, at the maximum rate of 7 ounces per acre, we’ve seen seven to 10 weeks of residual control when applied as a preemergence.

One benefit of that long-lasting residual control is it gives farmers a much wider window to make postemergence applications. It also keeps those later-season weeds small and easier to control, so you can stay on label with planned postemergence treatments.

Of course, both the amount of moisture received after application as well as the soil type can factor into the duration of residual control experienced.

For more information about Sonic, talk with your local Corteva Agriscience territory manager or visit BattleWeeds.com.

soybean field

™®Trademarks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. Sonic is not registered for sale or use in all states. Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency to determine if a product is registered for sale or use in your state. Always read and follow label directions. ©2019 Corteva